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submission summary for #WSSSPE Policy session on Credit, Citation, and Impact

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submission summary for #WSSSPE Policy session on Credit, Citation, and Impact …

submission summary for #WSSSPE Policy session on Credit, Citation, and Impact
presentation by Heather Piwowar

November 2013
agenda: http://wssspe.researchcomputing.org.uk/

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

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  • 1. WSSSPE session on Policy: Credit, Citation, Impact #wssspe November  2013 submissions  summary   by  Heather  Piwowar,  @ImpactStory http://wssspe.researchcomputing.org.uk/contributions/
  • 2. Matthew Knepley, Jed Brown, Lois Curfman McInnes, Barry Smith Accurately Citing Software and Algorithms Used in Publications http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.785731
  • 3. The PETSc numerical libraries implement hundreds of published algorithms and can use over 50 optional external software packages. When users publish results based on a simulation involving PETSc, how do they know what papers they should cite as relevant and essential to their simulation? http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.785731
  • 4. model where the library itself generates the bibtex items based on exactly what algorithms and portions of the code are used in the application. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.785731
  • 5. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.785731
  • 6. Jason Priem, Heather Piwowar Toward a comprehensive impact report for every software project http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.790651
  • 7. Alternative metrics, Alternative products ImpactStory.org (formerly total-impact) http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.790651
  • 8. bare-bones support for software today: http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.790651
  • 9. Proposal to extend open­source ImpactStory web application: (a) text-mine the bulk of the scholarly literature for mentions of software (b) track downloads, installations, conversation, and reverse dependencies (c) present impacts in a “research package” integrating diverse research outputs. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.790651
  • 10. Daniel S. Katz Citation and Attribution of Digital Products: Social and Technological Concerns http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.791606
  • 11. we need to develop and build a set of tools and practices that: (1) register digital products and those who should be credited for those products (2) track usage of the products, and tie this usage to future products. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.791606
  • 12. Product A is a software package equally written by two authors: map is 50% credit to each. Product B is a paper that depended on this package, and the authors assign 10% credit to the package. Transitive credit: the two authors of software package Product A now each fairly claim 5% credit for paper Product B. If another paper is later written that extends the product B paper and gives 10% credit to that paper, the software package developers will also have 0.5% credit for the new paper. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.791606
  • 13. Neil Chue Hong, Brian Hole, Samuel Moore Software Papers: improving the reusability and sustainability of scientific software http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.795303
  • 14. Journal of Open Research Software an open access software metajournal papers describing research software with high reuse potential paper and metadata is peer reviewed. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.795303
  • 15. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.795303
  • 16. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.795303
  • 17. Frank Löffler, Steven R. Brandt, Gabrielle Allen and Erik Schnetter Cactus: Issues for Sustainable Simulation Software http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.1812
  • 18. The most severe problem for developers in most computational sciences currently is that while most of the work is done creating hopefully well-written, sustainable software, the academic success is often exclusively tied to the solution of the scientific problem the software was designed for. http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.1812
  • 19. Any requirement for citation would conflict with its free-software license. http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.1812
  • 20. Common Starting Point We need to improve credit for software that gets used.
  • 21. Common Issues people aren’t citing people don’t know what to cite software libraries, especially, are getting shortchanged the links between software and literature are complex. this is a source of strength, and needs to be modelled as such.
  • 22. Common Solutions make it citeable track what software it is that people have been using help people determine what they should cite
  • 23. Issues undiscussed in these papers how to get people to cite - did discuss make it citeable, make it easy to cite - but what about raising expectations so it is expected? or push notifications (“have you cited this lately”) ? or journal or funder requirements for citing citing a given version, especially as tied to reproducibility finely-grained authorship for old and large systems how to sustain these solutions
  • 24. • For more on the workshop: • http://wssspe.researchcomputing.org.uk/ • http://arxiv.org/abs/1311.3523 • notes: bit.ly/wssspe13  • #wssspe