2010.05.11 Security on Mission: How to Survive a Kidnapping

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The purpose of this Live Web Seminar was to discuss preventive and mitigation strategies with humanitarian professionals who may face the risk of being kidnapped on mission. Drawing from experts in …

The purpose of this Live Web Seminar was to discuss preventive and mitigation strategies with humanitarian professionals who may face the risk of being kidnapped on mission. Drawing from experts in this field, Dr. Stephen Morris and Claude Bruderlein reviewed the potentially traumatic implications of such tragedy and allowed participants to share their views.

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  • 1. Welcome to the 2010 Health and Safety on Mission Series
    Produced by the Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research
    Webcast directly from Harvard University
    Bringing in guest speakers from around the world
    Purpose: To promote information exchange and discussion among humanitarian professionals and to address their unique needs with an emphasis on:
    • Personal wellbeing
    • 2. Personal and family health
    • 3. Professional satisfaction
    • 4. Safety and security while on mission
  • Security on Mission:
    How to Survive a Kidnapping
    11 May 2010
  • 5. Security on Mission: How to Survive a Kidnapping
    Live Web Discussion - 11 May 2010
    Mr. Claude Bruderlein
    Director
    Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research at Harvard University
    Dr. Stephen Morris
    International Emergency Medicine Fellow Clinical Instructor at Brigham and Women's Hospital at
    Harvard Medical School
    Ms. Elizabeth Holland
    Program Associate
    Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research at Harvard University
  • 6. Security on Mission: How to Survive a Kidnapping
    Live Web Discussion - 11 May 2010
    This discussion will address the prevention and mitigation of kidnapping and will include a panel of seasoned operators and experts on this issue. The hosts and panelists will explore the causes, risks, and consequences of kidnapping for humanitarian professionals.
    • Overview of definitions and circumstances of kidnapping of humanitarian workers
    • 7. Review of commonly held beliefs surrounding kidnapping
    • 8. Discussion with Stuart Groves, Senior Operations Officer, Division of Regional Operations, United Nations Department of Safety and Security
    • 9. Discussion of professional-level reactions to the real threat of kidnapping: what do we as a professional community need to do with regard to this problem?
  • Dr. Stephen Morris is currently the Harvard International Emergency Medicine Fellow and a Clinical Instructor of Emergency Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Stephen’s clinical training took place at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, WA, and at Yale Emergency Medicine in New Haven, CT.
    Stephen has worked in a variety of clinical and public health programs around the world, as well as education and development programs in the Americas, research in Africa and Asia, and policy and management work with the World Health Organization. He has experience in post-conflict and post-disaster settings, mostly recently as the acting medical director of a field hospital in Haiti.
  • 10. Overview
    adapted from Hostage Survival Skills, Major PJ Murphyhttp://www.nato.int/docu/colloq/w970707/p6.pdf
    • Types of Hostage Situations
    • 19. Barricade-people held in a place or building with hostage takers
    • 20. Containment-groups of people are prevented by force from moving
    • 21. Human Shields- hostages are placed in harms way to prevent attack by another force
    • 22. Kidnapping- people are captured and held in exchange for something
    Overview
  • 23. Overview
    • Stages of Kidnapping
    • 24. Planning and surveillance
    • 25. Attack (kidnapping begins)
    • 26. Movement (maybe repeated)
    • 27. Captivity
    • 28. Release
    • 29. Possible relationship between captive and captors
    • 30. Physical restraint and sensory deprivation
    • 31. Mental cruelly
    • 32. Interrogation
    • 33. Indoctrination
    • 34. Abuse
    • 35. Convivial relationship
  • Overview
    • Stages of Adaption to Captivity
    • 36. Startle and panic (minutes)
    • 37. Disbelief (minutes to hours)
    • 38. Hyper vigilance and anxiety (hours to days)
    • 39. Resistance / compliance (days to weeks)
    • 40. Depression and despair (weeks to months)
    • 41. Gradual acceptance (months to years)
    • 42. Emotional Reaction
    • 43. Shock and panic- unclear thinking
    • 44. Anger and emotional liability
    • 45. Affects of stress on well being and health
  • Overview
    • Risk Periods
    • 46. Initial phase: high levels of instability of captors
    • 47. Movement: security risk for captors
    • 48. Captor resistance: increased risk of bad outcome
    • 49. Release: possible armed event and violence, release to alternative captive situation
  • Overview
    • Survival Techniques
    • 50. Repress unclear thinking of initial reactions: remain calm and composed
    • 51. Maintain a quiet and unprovocativeattitude
    • 52. Establish yourself as a person and individual
    • 53. Follow the rules given to you, as well as you can
    • 54. Avoid undue exchange of information
    • 55. Win the respect of your captors
    • 56. Set goals and keep objectives in mind
    • 57. Attempt to maintain control of your environment
  • Overview
    • Survival Techniques continued
    - Keep your mind active
    • Attempt to understand your captors
    • 58. Attempt to be lighthearted, use humor if possible
    • 59. Take care of yourself: eat and exercise
    • 60. Keep hope alive
    • 61. Utilize stress management / relaxation techniques
    • 62. Accept what is outside of your control
    • 63. Be tolerant
  • Overview
    • After Kidnapping Event
    • 64. Avoid comments to media prior to debriefing and period of reflection
    • 65. Actively participate in recovery opportunities
    • 66. Engage in support and community
    • 67. Recognize reactions in need of professional assistance
  • Stuart Groves, Senior Operations Officer for the United Nations Department of Safety and Security was until recently the Senior Security Manager with the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, having started with them in Burundi in 1996 following a 36 year career with the Canadian Army.
    Since then he has seen mission service in all major areas of UN activity world wide. He led the UN internal investigation into the Canal Hotel bombing in Baghdad and was a member of the Secretary-General’s Security Accountability panel. He was an active member of the steering group of the UN security network which developed global security policy and procedures. Mr. Groves is a graduate of Military staff colleges in Canada, Norway, and the United States; the year long Canadian National Security Studies course; and the UN Hostage Incident Managers course. He also holds an MBA and an MSc in Security Management.
  • 68. Question and Answer
  • 69. HostsClaude BruderleinStephen MorrisProducerElizabeth HollandTechnical DirectorJames BrockmanProduction TeamChristina Blunt Cecil HaverkampAnaïde NahikianDustin Lewis
  • 70. If you are interested in participating in the ongoing global research survey on the
     
    Safety, Security, and Well-Being of
    Humanitarian Professionals
     
    please visit
    http://tinyurl.com/3357j47
     
    The survey is part of HPCR's broader research program based at the Harvard School of Public Health, and will be open until
    15 May 2010
  • 71. The Health and Safety on Mission Series
    is produced by:
    Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research (HPCR)
    Harvard University School of Public Health
    Sponsored by
    For more information on this series, please contact:
    hpcr@hsph.harvard.edu