What it Means to be an Open Scholar and the Future of Scholarly Publishing

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Presentation given at OISE library as part of Open Access Week 2010. Video+slides: http://142.150.98.64/OISE/20101021-120919-1/rnh.htm

Abstract: As scholars, we want to make our work widely known, and to receive recognition for our achievements. As educational researchers, we have a special interest in making our research available to those who can practically benefit from it: teachers, school boards, parents and politicians. Open Access to our research publications is an important first step, but we can go much further than this. Scholars in all fields are experimenting with many innovative ways of sharing their research, both during the research process, and afterwards. This presentation will introduce a number of case studies, discuss advantages and challenges in making your research more open, and outline trends in the future of scholarly communications.

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What it Means to be an Open Scholar and the Future of Scholarly Publishing

  1. 1. What it Means to be an Open Scholar (and the Future of Scholarly Publishing) Stian Håklev Open Access Week 2010 CC BY CC BY Darwin Bell @ Flickr
  2. 2. Open Scholar?
  3. 3. The Open Scholar, as I'm defining this person, is not simply someone who agrees to allow free access and reuse of his or her traditional scholarly articles and books; no, the Open Scholar is someone who makes their intellectual projects and processes digitally visible and who invites and encourages ongoing criticism of their work and secondary uses of any or all parts of it--at any stage of its development. Gideon Burton, www.academicevolution.org
  4. 4. Publication
  5. 5. Open Access
  6. 6. Open Access Green OA
  7. 7. Open Access Green OA
  8. 8. Open Access Green OA Gold OA
  9. 9. But will anyone read it?
  10. 10. The current Open Access model is provisioning for legacy genres and formats of scholarly communication. That's great for archival purposes, but this is not the next real destination for scholarly discourse. Why? Because consequential intellectual work takes place in myriad ways outside of traditional scholarly genres, that's why, and the digital realm is ready to capture, organize, value, and disseminate those other ways of generating knowledge. Gideon Burton, www.academicevolution.org
  11. 11. Other things
  12. 12. Other things Data of all kinds, including interviews, reading notes
  13. 13. Other things Data of all kinds, including interviews, reading notes Papers written for school
  14. 14. Other things Data of all kinds, including interviews, reading notes Papers written for school Teaching material
  15. 15. Research process
  16. 16. Possible problems?
  17. 17. Possible problems? Getting scooped
  18. 18. Possible problems? Getting scooped Privacy and ethics
  19. 19. Possible problems? Getting scooped Privacy and ethics The data deluge
  20. 20. Online profile
  21. 21. Being an Open Scholar
  22. 22. Being an Open Scholar Improves the quality of your research
  23. 23. Being an Open Scholar Improves the quality of your research Increases your connections, reach, opportunities
  24. 24. Being an Open Scholar Improves the quality of your research Increases your connections, reach, opportunities “Flattens” the world of academia
  25. 25. Being an Open Scholar Improves the quality of your research Increases your connections, reach, opportunities “Flattens” the world of academia Dont’ have to do all, but try some of it!
  26. 26. The Future of Scholarly Publishing
  27. 27. Some trends Recognition of new forms of scholarship From journal metrics to article metrics Experiments with peer-review Journal disaggregation Away from PDFs - semantic markup Linked data
  28. 28. soc  images 61
  29. 29. Some trends Recognition of new forms of scholarship From journal metrics to article metrics Experiments with peer-review Journal disaggregation Away from PDFs - semantic markup Linked data
  30. 30. Some trends Recognition of new forms of scholarship From journal metrics to article metrics Experiments with peer-review Journal disaggregation Away from PDFs - semantic markup Linked data
  31. 31. Some trends Recognition of new forms of scholarship From journal metrics to article metrics Experiments with peer-review Journal disaggregation Away from PDFs - semantic markup Linked data
  32. 32. Some trends Recognition of new forms of scholarship From journal metrics to article metrics Experiments with peer-review Journal disaggregation Away from PDFs - semantic markup Linked data
  33. 33. Text “What is inside our full-text articles, and how do we improve access to it? Or: Stories, that persuade with data.”, Anita de Ward
  34. 34. “What is inside our full-text articles, and how do we improve access to it? Or: Stories, that persuade with data.”, Anita de Ward
  35. 35. “What is inside our full-text articles, and how do we improve access to it? Or: Stories, that persuade with data.”, Anita de Ward
  36. 36. Some trends Recognition of new forms of scholarship From journal metrics to article metrics Experiments with peer-review Journal disaggregation Away from PDFs - semantic markup Linked data
  37. 37. Thanks! Stian  Håklev shaklev@gmail.com http://reganmian.net

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