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Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest
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Ebooks challenges and opportunities in academic library: A case study from the Lebanese American University and ProQuest

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Ebooks challenges and opportunities as identified by both a librarian and an ebook vendor.

Ebooks challenges and opportunities as identified by both a librarian and an ebook vendor.

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  • 1. Houeida Kammourié-Charara InfoCommons Librarian Lebanese American University Zoë Loveland Director – Academic Segment Planning for Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America ProQuest
  • 2. Vickery, B C. Scientific Communication in History. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press, 2000.
  • 3. Vickery, B C. Scientific Communication in History. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press, 2000.
  • 4. Borrowed from Daniel Forsman at Stellenbosch Symposium 2013 who borrowed from Lars Juhl Jensen http://www.slideshare.netlarsjuhljensen/mining-biomedical-texts
  • 5. Borrowed from Maslow and BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23902918
  • 6. Borrowed from Tony Davies ‘Ebooks Down Under’ Charleston Conference 2013https://www.dropbox.com/s/dpsb3v6jk3xy6gr/Charleston%20Ebooks%20 Down%20Under.pptx
  • 7. Monograph budgets in decline – squeeze by electronic journals, databases, etc. Lack of space in the library Cost of keeping books on shelves Web – changing users expectations Use of print monographs low and in decline Rise in expenditure on Interlibrary loan Stretched resources The Economy 7
  • 8. Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines eBook as “a book composed in or converted to digital format for display on a computer screen or handheld device”. “An e-book is an electronic book that can be read digitally on a computer screen, a special e- book reader, a personal digital assistant (PDA), or even a mobile phone” (Nelson, 2008).
  • 9.  Portability: A large number of eBooks can be carried in a portable device.  Download-ability: Download chapters or sections to a device for later use.  Interactivity: Annotating, bookmarking and highlighting.  Simplicity: Ease of use of dedicated eBook readers and Mobile devices.
  • 10.  Searchability: Search within and across eBook content.  Timeliness: Fast access to relevant content via keywords searching.  Practicality: eBooks can be used anytime and everywhere.  Accessibility: eBooks provide an easy way of accessing work at patrons convenience and leisure.
  • 11.  Cultural resistance mainly from “Digital immigrants” Piracy of eBook content Ownership of eBook content  Constraint of DRM software  Acquisition/Cataloging processes and decisions are time consuming  Negotiating licenses for each different platform and/or individual books.
  • 12.  “libraries with foreign credit cards may be unable to obtain certain titles” (Walters, 2013).  Printing/Downloading restrictions are hard to identify  Cut-and-paste often disabled  “previously acquired e-books may become inaccessible if the user crosses into a nation where the original license agreement is not in force” (Walters, 2013).
  • 13.  Subscription  Purchase  Subject Based Package  Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) or  Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA)  Title by Title  Pay-per-View  Firm Order  Number of Users  Consortia Deals Members of the Lebanese Academic Library Consortium (LALC) are working together on subscribing to eBooks packages, such as ebrary, Safari, etc. However purchasing eBooks and sharing them among LALC members is not yet foreseeable.
  • 14.  In AP librarians identify the parameters for new titles (subject area, publisher, price, etc.), and the vendors send fitting titles to the library which review them for approval or rejection.  AP profiles can be used for PDA offerings.  Reduces cost of title acquisition.  Over a period of perhaps 5 years, most institutions, will have some money budgeted to PDA, (Esposito, 2012). PDA/DDA not yet practiced at Lebanese Libraries; Some libraries are considering it so far.
  • 15. Checkout model One user can lend one title at a time, unless library has several copies to satisfy demand. Unlimited access Allowing several users to use the same title at a time.
  • 16. 2012 EPUB3 2010 EPUB 2.0.1 2007 EPUB 2.0 (close replica of print) 1999 Open eBook Publication Structure (OEBPS) MOBI, KF8, AZW and more… “EPUB3 is an open standard that can be consumed on multiple devices- computers, laptops, tablets, dedicated e-readers, and smartphones-from multiple vendors” (Polanka, 2013).
  • 17. DRM is like a lock and key for digital content. The media is locked, and you have to have the key to unlock it. Imagine you purchased a DVD that works in your home player; then your player breaks, you buy another one, and your DVD will not play in it. “It prevents legitimate customers from doing what they want with their content while doing absolutely nothing to the people who acquired the same content illegally” (Griffey, 2010). The most compelling reasons to bypass Digital Rights Management is by purchasing eBooks hosted on the publisher’s site.
  • 18. “The preservation of e-books is especially difficult because each e-book consists of several distinct elements:  Content and formatting of the work itself  File format  Software needed to access and use the file  Operating system needed to run the software,  Hardware compatible with the operating system”. Gale Standing order for LAU is an example.
  • 19. A pilot project of ILL of eBooks is currently in motion. It is a collaboration between Texas Tech University, the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Greater Western Library Alliance and Springer: Occam's Reader A software program (working with ILLiad) that allows interlibrary loan of ebooks. Currently working with .PDF documents only, with plans to support other formats of electronic books and to develop a stand-alone, web-based version of the system.
  • 20. Sue Polanka identified three main vendor types: Publishers: Direct price negotiation with no intermediary. This process requires staff time, mainly for licensing. Aggregators: An Aggregator represents several publishers, therefore will renegotiate with all publishers any change in business models, or license terms. Wholesalers: These are similar to aggregators because they negotiate the licenses and track billing and ordering (and shipping for print titles). But most do not have an eBook interface, thus they sell access to eBooks from multiple aggregators.
  • 21. Publishers that offer content directly to libraries Elsevier Oxford University Press Royal Society of Chemistry Springer Cambridge University Press Specialist aggregator Knovel (engineering) Safari (management and technology) Alexander Street Press (social sciences and humanities) Large aggregators Dawsonera EBL and ebrary (ProQuest) EBSCO (formerly NetLibrary) MyiLibrary (a subsidiary of Ingram). JSTOR Project MUSE Library vendors (P+E) Blackwell Coutts Swets YBP
  • 22.  Title Selection:  Titles to be shifted/purchased are selected by Concerned Librarians with the approval of the University Librarian.  Content evaluation (excerpt/portion/one or two chapters preview) through:  Trial via IP (preferably) sent to all@lau, or via username and password.  Licensing: Before ordering, the library negotiates the license agreement and makes sure Perpetual Access/Archival Rights clause is to the benefit of the library; and the cost of online format is justifiable.  Ordering: Once ordered, and upon activation, the product will be added to the Libraries website and an email to all@lau will be sent to promote the newly added resource.
  • 23. •Vendor’s version of DRM is a major barrier to eBooks implementation. •Librarians should investigate the license agreement carefully. DRM • Addressing eBook requires involvement of IT units, librarians, college stores, faculty, and students. • Any resentment from any stakeholder, may slow down the process. Cooperation • Printing/Downloading capabilities are not unified among publishers. • This should be investigated and negotiated during licensing process. Printing
  • 24. Understand your needs and goals:  Space: Library needs to assign more space to students  Meet Demand: Students are asking for more seats/PCs  Extend print access: Circulate the Reference collection  Specialized collection curation: Theses and dissertation (I.R.) Define your values and expectations  Ownership vs. access: Having access to information is more critical to users than owning the info.  Libraries & ROI?  What do you want to achieve? Our main goal is our user satisfaction. Set a budget and timeframe
  • 25.  Founded in 1999 by Kevin Sayar & Christopher Warnock  Variety of models, products, and services ◦ Subscription (ebrary pioneered this e-book model) ◦ Perpetual archive ◦ Patron-driven acquisition ◦ Short-term loans ◦ SaaS and DASH!  2011 became a ProQuest business • Company founded in 1997 by Australian booksellers • EBL launched in 2004 • Variety of models, products, and services • Perpetual Access • Non-linear Lending Model (EBL pioneered this e-book model) • Demand-driven Acqusition (EBL pioneered this model) • Short-term loans (EBL pioneered this model) • May 2013 became a ProQuest business
  • 26. Choice ∙ Experience ∙ Integration Innovation ∙ Value ∙ Support
  • 27. Researcher PublisherLibrary Discovery Access Research Tools Maximise Dissemination & Revenue Optimise Budget & Streamline Workflow
  • 28. ILS VENDORS • Intota • OCLC • Other ILS vendors SSO AND AUTHENTICATION • EZProxy • Athens • Shibboleth ebrary/ EBL BOOK VENDORS • YBP • Coutts DISCOVERY • Summon • PQ platform • Other Discovery Services
  • 29. [PA] Perpetual Archive 84% of titles have multiple concurrent access Extended Access™ for single-user titles Non-Linear™ Lending Multiple simultaneous access at or near hardback price [SUB] Subscription Affordable base, unlimited multi-user access and continued growth Subscriptions based on specific industries, engineering disciplines, business skills, and corporate departments [PDA/DDA] Patron/Demand-driven Acquisition Just in time, not just in case Sophisticated profiling tools Flexible Short-term Loans (STL) options Diversifying models aids in collection development and shows the greatest ROI PDA/DDA PA SUB
  • 30. 32 ISBNs – Cleaning, Matching, Reporting Benefits – No duplicates, Space Saving, Collection Development, Strategic Acquisition (Sub, DDA, Purchase, NLL), Discounts, High Use
  • 31. Several Lebanese academic libraries started the purchase of eBooks, No official statistics yet. Lack of financial means is influencing libraries not to invest in eBooks. Librarians may want to see how others are dealing with eBooks, eBooks readers, platforms etc. before going live. LAU Libraries were pioneersin circulating eBooks readers/Tablets among students in academic libraries in Lebanon. Image Source: http://www.itwebafrica.com/images/stories/ebookskenya.jpg
  • 32. EReader Location Date received # of Loans 2012 # of Loans 2014 % increase Kindle 2.0.2 RNL 19-Feb-10 16 21 31.25% Kindle DX Wireless (9.7") BY 7-Apr-10 0 2 0% Sony reader RNL 13-Jan-11 2 3 50% iPad RNL 17-Jan-11 481 796 65.48% iPad RNL 17-Jan-11 501 808 61.27% iPad BY 21-Jan-11 72 193 168.00% iPad 2 RNL 25-Oct-11 106 566 439.04% iPad 2 RNL 25-Oct-11 0 729 0% iPad 2 BY 24-Jan-12 30 214 613.33% Kindle 6.2.1 (kindlefire) RNL 30-Jan-12 0 8 0% iPad 3 RNL 20-Feb-13 - 184 N/A iPad 2 BY 10-Aprl-13 - 28 N/A iPad 2 BY 2-Dec-13 - 9 N/A iPad 3 BY 2-Dec-13 - 10 N/A
  • 33. Conversion of print book (p-book) to e-book started in 2000 with Encyclopaedia Britannica …ongoing process 2010-2011 # of eBooks: 121,553 2011-2012 # of eBooks: 137,208 2012-2013 # of eBooks: 182,126 Source: SerialsSolutions Ebrary and SAFARI are entered as one entry in OPAC; Springer is added at the title level.
  • 34. OPAC Entries
  • 35. Libraries need to expect and embrace change with all its challenges and opportunities. Implementing eBooks successfully is challenge #1in this decade.
  • 36. Carreiro, E. (2010). Electronic books: How digital devices and supplementary new technologies are changing the face of the publishing industry. Publishing Research Quarterly, 26(4), 219-235. Retrieved March 1, 2014, from http://www.springerlink.com/content/815l71g801370q2u/ E-book. Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Retrieved March 16, 2014, from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/e-book Esposito, J. (2012). The Faculty’s Role in Patron-driven Acquisitions, The Scholarly Kitchen. Retrieved February 28, 2014, from http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2012/02/08/the- facultys-role-in-patron-driven-acquisitions/ Griffey, J. (2010). Electronic book readers. Library Technology Reports, 46(3), 7-19, 2. Retrieved February 10, 2014, from http://search.proquest.com/docview/202709359?accountid=27870 Kelley, M., Fialkoff, F., & Miller, R. (2011). The ebook opportunity. Library Journal, 136(19), 36-n/a. Retrieved February 20, 2014, from http://search.proquest.com/docview/902852500?accountid=27870 Li, C., Poe, F., Potter, M., Quigley, B., & Wilson, J. (2011, May). UC Libraries Academic e-Book Usage Survey. Retrieved March 2, 2014, from http://www.cdlib.org/services/uxdesign/docs/2011/academic_ebook_usage_survey.pdf Miller, R. (2011). Dramatic growth. Library Journal, 136(17), 32-32. Retrieved February 11, 2014, from http://search.proquest.com/docview/896338418?accountid=27870
  • 37. Nelson, M. R. (2008). E-books in higher education: Nearing the end of the era of hype? Educause Review, 43(2). Retrieved March 24, 2014, from http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/e- books-higher-education-nearing-end-era-hype. Polanka, S., (Ed.). (c2011). No shelf required: E-books in libraries. Chicago: American Library Association. Polanka, S. (2013). What Librarians Need to Know About EPUB3. Online Searcher, 70-72. http://corescholar.libraries.wright.edu/ul_pub/159 Polanka, S. (2011). Purchasing E-books in libraries: A maze of opportunities and challenges. Library Technology Reports, 47(8), 4-7, 58. Retrieved February 17, 2014, from http://search.proquest.com/docview/908429942?accountid=27870. Price, J. S. (2011). Patron driven acquisition of publisher-hosted content: Bypassing DRM. Retrieved March 1, 2012, from http://scholarship.claremont.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1001&context=library_staff. Rapp, D. (2011). Digital Book World Panels Tackle Libraries. Library Journal, 136(4),16. Retrieved March 1, 2012, from http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/ljinprint/currentissue/889052- 403/infotech_digital_book_world_panels.html.csp Walters, W. H. (2013). E-books in Academic Libraries: Challenges for Acquisition and Collection Management. Portal: Libraries and the Academy, 13(2). 187–211.
  • 38. Please feel free to contact us @ houeida.charara@lau.edu.lb & zoe.loveland@proquest.com A copy of this presentation will be available online on slideShare http://www.slideshare.net/houeidakam/ Nesbitt said "People who are digital natives, if they can't find it through the library they are going to go elsewhere…” (Kelley, M., Fialkoff, F., & Miller, R. 2011).

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