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Ready or Not…IPv6 is here!
 

Ready or Not…IPv6 is here!

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With the end of IPv4 addresses in sight it is imperative that companies adopt IPv6, before time runs out and the global Internet community is fragmented. By HostingCon 2011, the free pool of IPv4 ...

With the end of IPv4 addresses in sight it is imperative that companies adopt IPv6, before time runs out and the global Internet community is fragmented. By HostingCon 2011, the free pool of IPv4 addresses may very well be depleted. In order to avoid potential operability issues later, hosting companies are encouraged begin IPv6 adoption now, as consumers will start to expect IPv6 enabled websites. John will describe the business case for adopting IPv6, the steps hosting companies should already be taking to prepare for IPv4 depletion challenges, and how to get IPv6 address space from ARIN.

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  • IPv6 provides a much larger pool of IP addresses. IPv6 is not backwards compatible with IPv4. The much larger IPv6 numbering system is meant to one day completely replace IPv4, but this will take many years. In the meantime, much of the Internet will run IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously. This is necessary to ensure all users, regardless of the protocol version they are using, will be able to interact with all content on the Internet.
  • The IANA pool of IPv4 address space depleted on February 3, 2011. This slide shows the steady depletion of that pool over time.
  • Now that the IANA IPv4 pool has depleted, the RIRs are left with their final existing inventories. Demand for the resource will determine when the RIR IPv4 pools deplete. We expect the pools to begin depleting before the end of 2011.
  • IPv6 provides a much larger pool of IP addresses. IPv6 is not backwards compatible with IPv4. The much larger IPv6 numbering system is meant to one day completely replace IPv4, but this will take many years. In the meantime, much of the Internet will run IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously. This is necessary to ensure all users, regardless of the protocol version they are using, will be able to interact with all content on the Internet.
  • The RIRs began distributing IPv6 address space in 1999. Although thousands of organizations have obtained IPv6 resources to date, IPv6 has not been widely adopted. Some people predicted in the 1990s that the only true driver for IPv6 adoption would be the depletion of the IPv4 resource. Many people would agree those assessments were accurate, as today we see increased energy to adopt IPv6 in anticipation of imminent IPv4 depletion.
  • Building new networks and adding new users to the Internet require contiguous number resources. As we move closer to the depletion of the IPv4 resource, there will soon only be contiguous IPv6 resources available for new networks and users. This impacts everyone, but in slightly different ways. It is up to all of us to make this transition to a dual-stacked Internet as transparent as possible to home users. There is a fair amount of work involved to make this happen. It is important it does happen to ensure the smooth operation of the Internet we all enjoy today.
  • In addition to provisioning new customers using IPv6, there is work to be done by Internet Service Providers to ensure their existing IPv4 customers are able to interact with new IPv6-only content on the Internet. ISPs must establish protocol translation and/or tunneling services for their customers. You should be planning this now.
  • In addition to provisioning new customers using IPv6, there is work to be done by Internet Service Providers to ensure their existing IPv4 customers are able to interact with new IPv6-only content on the Internet. ISPs must establish protocol translation and/or tunneling services for their customers. You should be planning this now.
  • Content providers must begin upgrading their capabilities to include IPv6 access to services for their customers. Demand from customers may be low today, but soon they will begin contacting you to determine why people can ’t see their website or send them e-mail. It is important to act now and ensure services over both IPv4 and IPv6.
  • Nearly all enterprise organizations rely on the Internet for at least part of their core operations and services. To ensure these services can communicate with everyone on the Internet going forward, your network infrastructure must be dual-stacked. Doing this now will ensure all users will continue to be able to see your website, use your web-based services, and communicate with you via e-mail. You may manage these services internally or through a vendor. Either way, speak to those who are responsible for your network operations about adding IPv6 accessibility to them.
  • Equipment vendors who distribute a hardware or software product that interacts with IPv4 networks should be making sure it is also capable of interacting with IPv6. Although customer demand for IPv6 support may have been limited in the past, it will very quickly escalate. To be prepared for customer demand, begin introducing IPv6 support into your product cycle as soon as possible.
  • Governments should use this time to promote IPv6 awareness. Coordinating with industry, creating incentives, and promoting IPv6 adoption are all very important and helpful ways for governments to assist with the transition to a dual-stacked Internet. Officially adopting IPv6 and making government services available over both versions of the Internet Protocol sends a very strong message and ensures services remain available to all.
  • You can become involved in the ARIN processes to ensure your Internet number resource needs are met and the entire community benefits from your important participation. Information is available at the provided links.
  • Please contact info@arin.net with any questions, comments, or suggestions.

Ready or Not…IPv6 is here! Ready or Not…IPv6 is here! Presentation Transcript

  • Ready or Not…IPv6 is Here! HostingCon 8 August 2011 John Curran President and CEO ARIN
  • Quick History of the Internet Protocol
    • Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4, or just “IP”)
      • First developed for the original Internet (ARPANET) in spring 1978
      • Deployed globally with growth of the Internet
      • Total of 4 billion IP addresses available
      • Well entrenched and used by every ISP and hosting company to connect customers to the Internet
      • Allocated based on documented need
    • Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)
      • Design started in 1993 when IETF forecasts showed IPv4 depletion between 2010 and 2017
      • Completed, tested, and available for production since 1999
      • Total of 340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 IP addresses available
      • Used and managed similar to IPv4
  • Available IPv4 Space in /8s
  • IPv4 Depletion Situation Report
    • Each RIR received its last /8 from IANA on 3 February 2011.
    • The IANA free pool of IPv4 addresses has reached 0%.
    • While each RIR currently has IPv4 addresses to allocate, it is impossible to predict when each RIR will run out.
  • IPv4 & IPv6 - The Bottom Line
    • We ’re running out of IPv4 address space.
    • IPv6 must be adopted for continued Internet growth.
    • IPv6 is not backwards compatible with IPv4.
    • We must maintain IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously for many years.
    • IPv6 deployment has begun.
  • RIRs have been allocating IPv6 address space since 1999. Thousands of organizations have received an IPv6 allocation to date. ARIN has IPv6 distribution policies for service providers, community networks, and end-user organizations. IPv6 Deployment has begun
  • Action Plans
    • What does this mean for:
      • Broadband Access Providers?
      • Internet Service Providers?
      • Internet Content Providers?
      • Enterprise Customers?
      • Equipment Vendors?
      • Government Organizations?
  • Call to Action Your customers want access to the entire Internet, and this means IPv4 and IPv6 websites. Offering full access requires running IPv4/IPv6 transition services and is a significant engineering project. Multiple transition technologies are available, and each provider needs to make its own architectural decisions.
  • Plan out how to connect businesses via IPv6-only and IPv4/IPv6 in addition to IPv4-only. Businesses are beginning to ask for IPv6 over their existing Internet connections and for their co-located servers. Communicate with your peers and vendors about IPv6, and confirm their timelines for production IPv6 services. Call to Action
  • Content must be reachable to newer Internet customers. Content served only via IPv4 will be accessed by IPv6 customers via transition solutions run by access providers. Plan on serving content via IPv6 in addition to IPv4 as soon as possible. Call to Action
  • Mail, web, and application servers must be reachable via IPv6 in addition to IPv4. Open a dialogue with your Internet Service Provider about providing IPv6 services. Each organization must decide on timelines, and investment level will vary. Call to Action
  • There was probably limited demand for IPv6 in the past. Demand for IPv6 support will become mandatory very, very quickly. Introduce IPv6 support into your product cycle as soon as possible. Call to Action
  • Coordinate with industry to support and promote awareness and educational activities. Adopt regulatory and economic incentives to encourage IPv6 adoption. Require IPv6 compatibility in procurement procedures. Officially adopt IPv6 within your government agencies. Call to Action
  • Learn More and Get Involved
    • Learn more about IPv6
    • www.arin.net
    • www.getipv6.info
    • www.TeamARIN.net
    • Get Involved in ARIN
    • Public Policy Mailing List
    • Attend a Meeting
    • http://www.arin.net/participate/
  • Thank You