hot research topics

8,808
-1

Published on

hot research topics in Electrical Engineering

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Very interesting. Thanks a lot.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
8,808
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
97
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Biomedical engineering is concerned with the development and manufacture of prostheses, medical devices, diagnostic devices, drugs, and other therapies. orPrimary focus is on understanding living systems. Examples include: auditory physiology and perception, human speech communication, the transmission and coding of signals in the nervous system, behavior of organisms, electrochemical properties of biological membranes, muscle physiology, interaction of high energy particles with living matter.Primary focus is on engineering problems which contain a living systems component or whose specification requires some knowledge of properties of living systems. Examples include: biomedical electronics, biological image processing, sensory-aid systems for the deaf and blind, clinical uses of high-energy particle beams and high energy X-rays in the treatment of tumors, reading machines for the blind, automatic speech recognition, human-machine interfaces for teleoperator and virtual-environment systems. areas: bioelectromagnetics, which involves the use of electromagnetic fields to probe biological function as well as to develop useful diagnostics and therapeutic instruments; neurobiological engineering, in which we endeavor to explore brain function using bioelectrical concepts and techniques as well as aid the development of advanced computer and "synthetically intelligent" systems; biomedical instrumentation; functional MRI; optics and holography; and specialized semiconductor devices. Research TopicsOur work includes a mixture of electrical engineering, physics, chemistry and biology, with an emphasis on neurophysiology at the molecular and cellular levels. Current topics include the development of theoretical models for the effects of electrical and magnetic fields on biological systems, in both power line and radio frequencies, including cell phones. We are also interested in the effects DC magnetic fields and their gradients may have on pain. Additionally, we are interested in comparing computer function and brain function at the molecular and cellular levels. Other related activity in our group includes work on functional MRI, the development of a rapid technique for sequencing DNA and other large biological molecules, and microscope imaging systems with extended depth of field.
  • Communication engineering and information theory are concerned with the efficient representation and reliable transmission and/or storage of information. Current research focuses on single and multiuser information and communication theory, error-control coding, information storage systems, cryptography, source coding, and resource allocation in communication networks. Both theoretical and practical questions are investigated. The theoretical area is concerned with the ultimate bounds on what can be achieved with a communication system under given constraints. Our practical interest is the question of how closely the theorectical bounds can be approached with modern circuit design and implementation methods and protocols. Communication engineering and information theory are also closely related to digital signal processing and systems theory. Research in signal processing and systems theory is concerned with theoretical developments that improve our understanding of communication, control, and information processing. These developments are applied to data communication, digital audio, pattern recognition, speech processing and recognition, audio and image compression, medical imaging, digital filtering, detection and estimation, and spectrum analysis. Signal processing and systems theory are closely allied with numerical linear algebra, applied probability, and computer architecture. Research TopicsCurrent research topics in communication engineering include multiuser detection, signal design and multiple access, adaptive receivers, stochastic algorithms for power control, and modulation/detection methods for wireless communications and their performance analysis, coding for multiple antenna systems, and joint resource allocation, coding schemes for high-density two-dimensional optical and magnetic recording devices, source coding including audio and image compression, cryptography, which deals with the issues of secrecy and security in communication, communication energy and quality of service constrained wireless network routing, energy aware ad hoc network systems and wireless cellular system design. Current research topics in signal processing include the design of multisensor arrays that incorpoprate steering and adaptive filtering in their internal structure; quadratic and parametric spectrum analysis; modal analysis; wavelets and orthogonal filters; the design and analysis of new adaptive structures and algorithms; the development of fast algorithms; the design of digital controllers which minimize finite register effects; multiscale and time frequency representations of images and multi-dimensional signals which involves the development of new mathematical and computational algorithms in the area of applied harmonic analysis. Applications are in biomedical signal and image analysis, and audio and image compression. Research in speech signal processing includes analysis and modeling of speech and speaker traits, speech pathology and voice assessment, speech enhancement and feature estimation in noise, robust speech recognition, and speech feature enhancement in hands-free environments for human-computer interaction.
  • The research program in computer engineering encompasses the modeling, analysis, and evaluation of next-generation computer systems. Research activities in computer systems are explored at various design levels, including VLSI, circuit, logic, microarchitecture, system, and network architectures. In particular, the research addresses aspects of high performance, low power, mobility, security, and reliability in computer systems -- including parallel processing, multiprocessing, embedded systems, and distributed network processing architectures. Hardware-software tradeoffs play a central role in the work, specifically in the study of the interaction of computer hardware and optimizing/parallelizing compilers. The computer engineering group interacts with the digital signal processing, VLSI, and remote sensing groups to develop interdisciplinary solutions to research problems.
  • Control techniques are used whenever some quantity, such as speed, temperature, or force must be made to behave in some desirable way over time. Technological demands today impose extremely challenging and widely varying control problems. In the ECEE dynamics and controls group, research opportunities include developing controllers for aircraft, spacecraft, information storage systems, human-machine interfaces, manufacturing processes, and power systems. The studies include linear and non-linear modeling of dynamic systems, analyses of dynamic behaviors, and design of controllers for assuring satisfactory and optimal performances. Jointly advised projects within or across departments are common, allowing students to tailor the theoretical and/or applications foci of their work to their interests. Several collaborations with local industry and government laboratories also enable students' access to state-of-the-art research equipment in a number of areas. Research TopicsCurrent topics include nonlinear control systems; aircraft on-board management systems; switching power converters; spacecraft control systems; control of web-winding systems; disk drive servomechanisms; mechanism and modeling for higher bandwidth force control of haptic interfaces; bi-manual haptic interfaces; adaptive control of wind turbines; distributed sensor fusion for tracking aircraft; control of sensor resources in large-scale multisensor surveillance systems; efficient ranking and optimization of target tracking algorithms; modeling and control of material processes.
  • The research program in applied electromagnetics covers a variety of topics that address current commercial, civil, and military needs. Specifically, our interests include active circuits and antennas for communications and radar, theoretical and numerical techniques for analysis of high-frequency circuits and antennas, RF photonics, artificial electromagnetic materials, electromagnetic remote sensing, etc. Our applications cover a broad frequency range, dc to optical. Research TopicsCurrent research topics include: smart (adaptive) antenna arrays, rf optical techniques for processing and control, RF MEMS, artificial electromagnetic materials, analytical and numerical techniques for modeling high-frequency and high-speed circuits and antennas, ultrabroadband and reconfigurable antennas and arrays, high-efficiency intelligent microwave front ends, quasi-optical techniques for the microwave and millimeter-wave range, micro-electromechanical antennas (MEM-tennas) and nano-antennas.
  • this field is concerned with design, fabrication and characterization of novel materials and devices with sub-micron feature sizes. Their potential applications include very high-speed devices, optical sources and detectors, optoelectronic components and all-optical devices. The design and fabrication of devices and integrated circuits are inextricably related to device physics, solid-state materials, and sophisticated processing techniques.Research TopicsThe research in progress ranges from fundamental growth and properties of materials to nanolithography and optical devices. Examples of topics of interest are thin semiconductor, insulator and metal films, growth, interface states and characterization; solar cells; fabrication, electron-beam lithography, characterization and theoretical simulation studies; high transition temperature bulk and thin film superconductor materials and devices; physics, fabrication and characterization of quantum well (QW) structures and novel optoelectronic devices; QW structures fabricated by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE); strained piezoelectric [111}A-oriented InGaAs/GaAs QW structures; double confinement laser devices for operation in the 1.0-1.3 mm wavelength range; wide bandgap semiconductor materials and devices, including SiC bipolar transistors; liquid crystal devices; infrared detectors; ultra-high speed photonic devices; thin film, high temperature superconductors fabricated by laser evaporation for use as optical and magnetic sensors; theoretical modeling of nano-photonic devices based on photonic crystals; fabrication of photonic crystal devices by self-assembly of nano-particles; and optical characterizations of novel luminescent materials and photonic crystals.
  • The research program in optics and photonics deals with the design, fabrication, and characterization of materials, devices and systems for the generation, transmission, amplification, detection, and processing of light signals. These are enabling and pervasive technologies applied in fields like communications, sensing, bio-medical instrumentation, consumer electronics, and defense. The department focuses on optical and quantum computing, RF signal processing, unconventional imaging systems, optical sensors, integrated optics, nanophotonics, optical interconnects, ultrafast micromachining, the design and fabrication of semiconductor lasers, and III-V semiconductor materials and devices. Research TopicsCurrent research topics include optoelectronic computing and signal processing; design, fabrication, and characterization of integrated optical components in a variety of materials; design and characterization of fiber optic (interconnection) networks; design and construction of optical crossbar switches and optical computers; optical associative memories; spatial light modulators; optical artificial intelligence; two- and three-dimensional imaging; optical inspection; neural networks; early sensory processing; amorphous silicon/liquid crystal spatial light modulators; nonlinear optical metrology. Current Research Support Research support is provided by the National Science Foundation, the Army Research Office, Optoelectronic Data Systems, Coherent Technologies, Office of Naval Research, Perdix, Network Photonics, the University of Nebraska, and the National Reconnaissance Office. The National Science Foundation supports the Optical Science and Engineering Program (OSEP), offering fellowships that provide full support for two years and partial support thereafter. Agilent supports a fellowship for research in photonics.
  • Research in VLSI/CAD works toward developing new algorithms and design methodologies to efficiently design VLSI ICs. VLSI researchers leverage knowledge of VLSI circuits and algorithms to devise VLSI design methodologies that allow the VLSI industry to design correct, faster, smaller and more power-efficient integrated circuits. Research in VLSI/CAD has proved to be one of the important reasons for the VLSI boom in recent years. Applications of such research abound in current industrial practice.
  • Research Fields 2010-11A broad range of research opportunities exists within the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and its associated interdepartmental laboratories. To evaluate your application as fairly as possible and to match your interests with available resources, we ask you to choose one of the research fields described below as your primary research field. Your application will be evaluated by faculty whose interests lie within that field and it is expected that your research program will be carried out in that field.Descriptions of Research Fields: Electrical Engineering | Computer Science (from H. below)A. Communications:Digital communication, information theory; coding; wireless and cellular systems; multi-user commmunications, multi-access systems, data networks, optical networks.B. Systems, Decision and Control:Dydnamic systems: hybrid systems, stochastic systems, large-scale systems; feedback control and decision systems, robust control, distributed and networked control, control over communication networks, optimization-based methodologies, game-theoretic formulations, operations research, scientific and engineering computation; learning and system identification: linear and nonlinear system identification, graphical models, systems over networks.C. Signal Processing:Digital signal processing, signal modeling, image processing, speech and audio processing, synthesis and recognition of speech, signal modeling; detection and estimation, statistical signal processing, array processing; oceanographic signals and systems; advanced television systems, video processing systems.D. Bioelectrical Engineering:Molecular engineering; micro- and nanosystems applied to biology and medicine; biophotonics and biomedical optics; medical imaging; electromagnetic fields in biological tissue and cells, connective tissue and cell physiology; auditory physiology and psychophysics; sensory aids for hearing and vision; biomedical and physiological instrumentation; speech production and perception.E. Circuit Design:Computer-aided circuit design, integrated cirucuit design and analysis; VLSI for signal processing and communications; analog and digital system design, theory of nonlinear circuits and systems; low-power electronics.F. Materials, Devices, Photonics:Materials growth, carbon nanotubes, organic materials; fabrication, integration, micro-electromechanical systems, nanotechnology; microelectronics, optoelectronics and organic optoelectronics, microwave and terahertz devices; quantum-effect device physics and electronics, quantum computation and quantum communication, nonlinear optics and ultrafast optics, and photonics.G. Electromagnetics, Energy and Power:Elecromagnetic waves/fields and interaction with matter, magnetic fluids, metamaterials, continuum electromechanics, plasmas and controlled thermonuclear fusion, energy conversion components and systems; thermo-photovoltaic devices, electric power systems and high voltage research, power electronics.Descriptions of Research Fields: Computer ScienceH. Theoretical Computer Science:Algorithms; computability and complexity; cryptography and network security; distributed systems; parallel algorithms.J. Computer Systems and Architecture:Computer architecture; distributed computing; fault-tolerant computing; high performance computing and applications; operating systems; parallel systems, parallel computation; programming languages and compilers; software specification, design, and analysis; VLSI architecture and computer systems.K. Artificial Intelligence:Knowledge representation and reasoning, knowledge-based systems, medical information systems; machine learning; natural language processing; perceptual interfaces and human/computer interaction; robotics; speech understanding; vision.L. Computer Networks:Adaptive networks; mobile and wireless computing; protocol design; router design.M. Computer Graphics:Computer animation; geometric modeling; graphical interfaces; image capture, image-based modeling and rendering; material modeling and textures; multimedia processing; rendering algorithms.N. Computational Biology:Genome interpretation, regulatory networks, genome evolution, gene identification, comparative genomics.
  • http://ee.stanford.edu/gradhandbook/Faculty_Research_Interests
  • ECEE Department has ten research areas: Biomedical EngineeringBiomedical engineering is concerned with the development and manufacture of prostheses, medical devices, diagnostic devices, drugs, and other therapies. Communications and Signal ProcessingCommunications engineering and information theory are interested in the efficient representation and reliable transmission and/or storage of information. Computer EngineeringA computer engineer is an electrical engineer with a focus on digital logic systems; a computer engineer is a software architect with a focus on the interaction between software programs and the related hardware components. Dynamics and ControlsControl techniques are used whenever some quantity, such as speed, temperature, or force must be made to behave in some desirable way over time. Electromagnetics, RF and MicrowavesThis area is concerned with the use of the electromagnetic spectrum. Nanostructures and DevicesSolid-state devices form the basis of integrated circuits, which have a variety of electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic applications. The research in this field is concerned with design, fabrication, and characterization of novel materials and devices with sub-micron feature sizes. Optics and PhotonicsThis area emphasizes the design, fabrication, and characterization of materials, devices and systems for the generation, transmission, amplification, detection, and processing of light signals. Power Electronics and Renewable Energy SystemsPower electronics are the technologies associated with the efficient conversion, control, and conditioning of electronic power by static means from its available input form into the desired electrical output form. Remote SensingRemote sensing research focuses on the measurement and interpretation of atmospheric properties from the troposphere through the mesosphere. VLSI/CADVery Large Scale Integration is a term applied to most modern integrated circuits. Research in this area works toward development of new algorithms and design methodologies to efficiently design VLSI integrated circuits.
  • University of Ottawa Research at SITE in Electrical, Computer and Software Engineering and Computer ScienceThe school of Information Technology and Engineering offers a vibrant research environment where the traditional disciplines of electronics, computer and software engineering and computer science come together to create unique synergy. The school has over 70 researchers and over 400 graduate students working in many laboratories and groups. SITE has strong connections with local industry and this results in a dynamic environment of collaboration and practical impact. For more information on current research activities within different research areas and various groups, please follow the links to the research areas, groups and professors below. Research AreasAlgorithms - Professors: Boyd, Flocchini, Jourdan, Mao(group), Moura, Stojmenovic, Turcotte (group), Yang (group), Zaguia(group) Research Groups: IPCOS, DMBioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering - Professors: Anis, Bouchard, Boukerche (group), Dajani, El Saddik, Frize(group), Mao(group), Matwin, Mussivand, Peyton, Rolland-Lagan, Sankoff (group), Turcotte(group); Broadband Networks - Internet - Professors: Ahmed, Bochmann(group), Hall (group), Ionescu (group), Makrakis, Mouftah(group), Yang(group);Distributed Computing and Systems - Professors: Bochmann(group), Bolić (group), Boukerche(group), Flocchini, Groza, Ionescu(group), Jourdan, Karmouch(group), Miri (group), Nayak, Stojmenovic, Ural; Electromagnetism, Radio-Frequencies and Microwaves - Professors: Ahmed, Berini, Gad, Loyka, McNamara, Yagoub (group); Research Group: RF&MInformation Management and Data Mining - Professors: Kiringa (group), Peyton, Tran, Viktor (group); Research Groups: ORNEC-ICTMultimedia and Interactive Virtual Environments - Professors: Boukerche(group), Dubois, El Saddik, Georganas, Laganière, Lang, Lee, Petriu, Shirmohammadi, Zhao; Research Groups: Discover, MCRPhotonics - Professors: Anis, Berini, Hall(group), Hinzer, Schriemer, Yao(group); Research Group: CRPuO, Extreme PhotonicsPrivacy and Security - Professors: Adams (group), Bochmann (group), Boukerche(group), Felty (group), Jourdan, Logrippo, Matwin, Miri(group), Peyton, Yeap; Research Group: ORNEC-ICTRobotics, Machine Vision and Autonomous Systems - Professors: Ahmed, Groza, Gueaieb, Laganière, Lang, Payeur, Petriu; Research Groups: SMR, GEMSSoftware Engineering - Professors: Amyot, Bochmann (group), Felty (group), Jourdan, Lethbridge (group), Logrippo, Peyton, Somé, Ural, Williams; Research Groups: CSERG, LFCSpeech/Audio/Image/Video Processing - Professors: Aboulnasr, Bouchard, Dajani, Dubois, Giguère, Laganière, Payeur, Zhao; Research Groups: SPOT, VIVAText Analysis and Machine Learning - Professors: Inkpen, Japkowicz, Matwin, Szpakowicz, Turcotte (group), Tran, Viktor; Research Groups: TAMALE, GRILWireless Communications - Professors: D'Amours, Galko(group), Loyka, Mao(group), Yao(group), Yeap (group), Yongaçoglu, Yagoub(group); Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing - Professors: Bolić (group), Boukerche(group), El Saddik, Nayak, Makrakis, Mouftah(group), Stojmenovic, Yang(group)Interdisciplinary Research GroupsOntario Research Network on Electronic Commerce - Information and Communications Technologies (ORNEC-ICT)Centre for Research in Photonics at the University of Ottawa (CRPuO)The Text Analysis and Machine Learning Group (TAMALE, GRIL)The Ottawa-Carleton Discrete Mathematics Group (DM)Logic and Foundation of Computing Group (LFC)Piano Pedagogy Research Lab (PianoLab)Medical Devices Center (MDC) at the University of Ottawa Heart InstituteBio-Medical Instrumentation and Processing Group (BioMIP)Area-Specific Research Groups involving several professorsCommunications Software Engineering Research Group (CSERG)Distributed and Collaborative Virtual Environments Research Lab (Discover)Computer Architecture Research Group (CARG) Integer Programming, Combinatorial Optimization and Structures (IPOS)Multimedia Communications Research Lab (MCRLab)Photonic Technology Laboratory (PTL)Radio-Frequency and Microwave Group (RF&M)Sensing and Modeling Research Lab (SMR)Signal Processing Oriented Technologies Research Group (SPOT)Video, Image, Vision, Audio Lab (VIVA)
  • Reprogrammable Logic / FPGAsReconfigurable digital circuitry has always provided inherent design flexibility. Historically, this flexibility has come at the expense of performance. However, with advances in IC fabrication technology, programmable logic performance has advanced to the point where it is meeting the computation needs of modern applications. This has created a paradigm shift in the way digital circuitry can be implemented. If programmable logic cells can perform as well as dedicated IC blocks, then the standard VLSI design flow will need to be reinvented. Reprogrammable fabrics now have the capacity to contain not only custom hardware but multiple soft processor cores. This capability enables computing approaches such as single-chip hardware accelerated processors, dynamically scalable parallel processing, and reconfigurable computing. The capability that now exists in computing hardware makes the effective partitioning between hardware and software a difficult challenge due to the endless implementation possibilities. Reconfigurable fabrics also have enabled novel architectures to address the robustness of a computer system. Redundancy (both static and dynamic) can be used to detect and recover from faults and spatial avoidance of faults can be used to extend lifetime of a part. These opportunities for fault tolerance are of great interest to the military and aerospace industry due to their unique need for robust computing platforms. Currently, research is being conducted in the ECE department at MSU in the area of effective hardware/software partitioning using soft processors on FPGAs. Research is also being conducted on the design of a radiation tolerant computing system for the aerospace industry which exploits partial reconfiguration of an FPGA to spatially move soft processors to different locations on the FPGA in order to avoid radiation strikes. Reconfiguration is also used to dynamically recover from a non-damaging radiation strike. Sponsors of this work include NASA, the Montana Space Grant Consortium, the National Space Grant Consortium, and the Office of Naval Research. The picture shown here is a Radiation Tolerant Many Core Computing System implemented on a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA. This system was developed for NASA to help increase reliability in interplanetary flight systems. This system contains 64 soft processors. At any given time, 3 of the processors are used in Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) to check for faults due to radiation. Upon a soft radiation strike, the TMR system reboots and resynchronizes the faulted processors. If the fault occurs in the reconfiguration RAM of the FPGA, the system performs partial reconfiguration on the effected processor in order to recover. If the fault is unrecoverable, the system brings on a new spare processor to form the TMR configuration and marks the damaged area as unusable. High Speed Digital DesignHigh-speed digital design is the generation and transmission of digital signals at a high enough frequency that the analog properties of the circuitry and interconnect must be considered. This paradigm shift in the way digital logic is approached is fueled by the dramatic improvement in integrated circuit fabrication technology. As device feature sizes continue to shrink, the speed at which digital signals can be generated is increased. As frequencies rise, the distributed nature of the materials that are used to fabricate the devices and interconnect must be approached differently. Analog circuit theory must be adapted to the generation of digital signals. Microwave circuit theory must be adapted to the design of interconnect systems. In addition, new physical structures must be invented that can generate and transmit the high-speed digital signals to meet the computation demands of the next decade. The continual improvement in the on-chip fabrication technology has also created paradigm shifts in the way digital logic is implemented. Programmable logic has benefited from improvements made in device fabrication. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA's) are beginning to compete with the once superior Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). The flexibility in a programmable element is fueling the need for more advanced programmable cells and novel partitioning algorithms that can combine ASIC and programmable circuitry to create a more efficient and higher performing computational block. Interconnect & PackagingAll digital signals need to traverse some type of interconnect, whether it be on-chip traces, IC packaging, printed circuit boards, cables, or connectors. With the exponential increase in on-chip device fabrication capability, edge rates from digital drivers will drop below 10ps within the next decade. These edge rates will require interconnect systems with up to 100 GHz of bandwidth to exist. Traditional interconnect and manufacturing processes will not be capable of meeting this demand. New styles of interconnect and design philosophies must be invented to keep pace with the ever increasing device technology. Microwave design principles will need to be adapted to meet these challenges. The engineer of tomorrow will no longer talk of interconnect in terms of lumped RC delay, but rather in terms of distributed parasitics, group delay, skin effect, and dielectric loss. The pictures shown directly above are of a novel chip-to-chip interconnect system which uses miniature coaxial cables. This system provides a completely impedance matched signal path between two die by interfacing on-chip coplanar transmission lines to a miniature coaxial cable using an etched trench. This type of interconnect system can be selectively added to wire bonded die using an incremental etching step. The system reduces impedance discontinuities, cross-talk, and ground bounce traditionally found in wire bonded systems.
  • hot research topics

    1. 1. Recent Research Areas In Electrical Engineering<br />Prepared by:<br />Eng. Hossam El-Sayed<br />2011<br />
    2. 2. Goal<br />This Presentation gives a simple introduction to the Recent areas of research in the field of Electrical Engineering with the concentration on the Circuits and VLSI branch.<br />The Major topics of Research I interest in will also introduce.<br />
    3. 3. Outlines<br />Areas of Research in Electrical Engineering<br />Major University and its Research Areas<br />Circuits and VLSI Research topics<br />Open Discussion<br />
    4. 4. Areas of Research in Electrical Engineering<br />
    5. 5. Biomedical (Bioelectrical) Engineering<br />Concerned with the development and manufacture of prostheses, medical devices, diagnostic devices, drugs, and other therapies.<br />It includes a mixture of electrical engineering, physics, chemistry and biology, with an emphasis on neurophysiology at the molecular and cellular levels.<br />
    6. 6. Communications and Signal Processing<br />Communications engineering and information theory are interested in the efficient representation and reliable transmission and/or storage of information. <br />Signal processing and systems theory is concerned with theoretical developments that improve our understanding of communication, control, and information processing.<br />
    7. 7. Computer Engineering<br />Research activities in computer systems are explored at various design levels, including VLSI, circuit, logic, microarchitecture, system, and network architectures. <br />The research addresses aspects of high performance, low power, mobility, security, and reliability in computer systems -- including parallel processing, multiprocessing, embedded systems, and distributed network processing architectures. <br />
    8. 8. Dynamics and Controls<br />Control techniques are used whenever some quantity, such as speed, temperature, or force must be made to behave in some desirable way over time. <br />Dynamics and controls group, research opportunities include developing controllers for aircraft, spacecraft, information storage systems, human-machine interfaces, manufacturing processes, and power systems. <br />
    9. 9. Electromagnetics, RF and Microwaves<br />The research program in applied electromagnetics covers a variety of topics that address current commercial, civil, and military needs. <br />Interests include active circuits and antennas for communications and radar, theoretical and numerical techniques for analysis of high-frequency circuits and antennas, RF photonics, artificial electromagnetic materials, electromagnetic remote sensing, etc.<br />
    10. 10. Nanostructures and Devices<br />this field is concerned with design, fabrication and characterization of novel materials and devices with sub-micron feature sizes. <br />The design and fabrication of devices and integrated circuits are inextricably related to device physics, solid-state materials, and sophisticated processing techniques.<br />
    11. 11. Optics and Photonics<br />The research in optics and photonics deals with the design, fabrication, and characterization of materials, devices and systems for the generation, transmission, amplification, detection, and processing of light signals. <br />These are enabling and pervasive technologies applied in fields like communications, sensing, bio-medical instrumentation, consumer electronics, and defense. <br />
    12. 12. VLSI/CAD<br />Research in VLSI/CAD works toward developing new algorithms and design methodologies to efficiently design VLSI ICs. <br />VLSI Design: Circuits to speed up on-chip data transfers, alleviate on-chip cross-talk, extreme low power circuits, circuits for low leakage power.<br />VLSI Design Automation: logic synthesis, layout synthesis, design automation of datapath circuits, hierarchical logic synthesis, fast delay estimation techniques for VLSI ICs. <br />
    13. 13. Major University and its Research Areas<br />
    14. 14. Major University and its Research Areas<br />Harvard University<br />Computer Engineering and Architecture<br />Circuits and VLSI<br />Signal Processing<br />Robotics and Control<br />
    15. 15. Major University and its Research Areas<br />MIT<br />Systems, Communication, Control and Signal Processing<br />Computer Science<br />Electronics, Computers, and Systems<br />Engineering Physics<br />
    16. 16. Major University and its Research Areas<br />Stanford<br />Systems Software: OS, compilers, languages<br />Systems Hardware: architecture, VLSI, embedded systems<br />Network Systems and Science: next gen internet, wireless networks<br />Communication Systems: wireless, optical, wireline<br />Control, Learning, and Optimization<br />Integrated Circuit design: MEMs, sensors, analog, RF<br />For other research areas <br />http://ee.stanford.edu/research_areas.php<br />
    17. 17. Stanford<br />
    18. 18. Major University and its Research Areas<br />Pittsburgh<br />Computer engineering<br />Devices (electronic and optical)<br />Signals and systems (signal processing, image processing, pattern recognition, and control)<br />http://www.engr2.pitt.edu/electrical/research/index.html<br />
    19. 19. Major University and its Research Areas<br />University of Colorado<br />Biomedical Engineering<br />Communications and Signal Processing<br />Computer Engineering<br />Dynamics and Controls<br />Electromagnetics, RF and Microwaves<br />Nanostructures and Devices<br />VLSI/CAD<br />
    20. 20. Major University and its Research Areas<br />University of Ottawa <br />University of Pennsylvania <br />University of Chicago<br />University of Toronto <br />California Institute of Technology<br />University of California, Berkeley<br />University of UCLA<br />
    21. 21. Circuits and VLSI Research topics<br />
    22. 22. Circuits and VLSI Research topics<br />VLSI architectures and algorithms for signal processing and communications, computer arithmetic and reconfigurable architectures.<br />Circuits and Systems for Signal Processing and Communications:<br />This activity involves developing VLSI algorithms, architectures and circuits for digital signal processing, image processing and wireless communications. <br />Examples: ADPLL, reconfigurable radio, low power digital filters, low power video decoding for mobile digital video platforms, etc. <br />
    23. 23. Circuits and VLSI Research topics<br />Reconfigurable Digital Systems:<br />Involves design and development of reconfigurable hardware that is suitable for DSP, multimedia applications, Rapid prototyping of wireless communication systems and sensor network platform .<br />Reprogrammable Logic / FPGAs<br />High Speed Digital Design<br />Interconnect & Packaging<br />
    24. 24. Open Discussion<br />
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×