Set Up, Maintain, And Dismantle Plantpowerpoint Pdf
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Set Up, Maintain, And Dismantle Plantpowerpoint Pdf

on

  • 1,602 views

This presentation by Lisa Short for Otago Polytechnic's course on setting up and maintaining plant displays. ...

This presentation by Lisa Short for Otago Polytechnic's course on setting up and maintaining plant displays.

Some information used in this slideshow comes from Dewayne L. Ingram, University of Florida, 2009. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG086

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,602
Views on SlideShare
1,600
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Set Up, Maintain, And Dismantle Plantpowerpoint Pdf Set Up, Maintain, And Dismantle Plantpowerpoint Pdf Presentation Transcript

    • Set up, maintain, and dismantle plant displays Unit 21035
    • Site Constraints Growing Media Drainage Shelter Sun/Shade
    • Growing Media Is there growing media on site? Can media be brought in? How is the media contained? Do surfaces need protecting?
    • Drainage Are there any natural drainage problems? Where will the irrigation water go?
    • Shelter Is there shelter from the wind? Is there shelter from the rain?
    • Sun/Shade Too sunny? Too shady? Do we need to provide shade? How does this effect plant selection?
    • Types of Display Permanent planting Seasonal planting Staged container plants Planted in a growing medium Indoor Outdoor
    • Display Areas Permanent beds Containers Tiered benches Hanging baskets
    • Staging Staging, benches, stands Growing medium Supporting structures Waterproof membranes Display aids Rocks, gravels, mulches Labels, interpretative material Edging
    • Maintenance Watering Picking over Fertilising Rotation or replacement of plants Staking Pruning Mulching Plant health
    • Plant Health Pests Diseases Physiological disorders Light Temperature Water Draughts/winds
    • Dismantle Leave the area clean, tidy and ready for the next use Transport?
    • Elements of Design Colour Form Texture
    • Principles of Design Unity/Harmony Rhythm or line Balance - Symmetry or Asymmetry Dominance/Emphasis or Focal Area Scale Proportion Contrast
    • Elements of Design The elements of design are components or parts of a design which can be isolated and defined in any design or work of art.
    • Colour Primary colours: Red Blue Yellow
    • Colour Secondary colours: Orange Green Violet Are a combination of two primary colours
    • Colour Tertiary colours: Are a fusion of one primary and one secondary colour. Are between the primary and secondary colours on the colour wheel
    • Colour Tint: Tint refers to a light value and is accomplished by adding white to the pure colour on the colour wheel
    • Colour Shade: Shade is a dark value and is created by adding black to the pure colour on the colur wheel.
    • A Colour Wheel Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Colour Schemes Colours are combined into colour schemes for practical applications
    • Colour Schemes Monochromatic Analogous Complementary
    • Colour Schemes Monochromatic: A monochromatic colour scheme consists of different tints and shades of one colour
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Colour Schemes Analogous: An analogous colour scheme combines colours which are side-by-side on the colour wheel
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Colour Schemes Complementary: A complementary colour scheme combines colours directly across the colour wheel
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Colour and Perspective Warm colours like red, orange and yellow advance an object towards the observer. Cool colours recede, and can appear further away from the observer.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Colours and Mood Cool colours are restful Warm colours suggest action
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Form Form can be discussed in terms of individual plant growth habits or as a the plant arrangement.
    • Form Examples: Upright Columnar Spreading Weeping
    • Form refers to the shape and structure of a plant or mass of plants Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Space The character of space around an object can distract, focus, or alter our impression. A cluttered background tends to dimish the importance of the object, while a plain background draws attention to it.
    • Texture Texture describes the surface quality of an object that can be seen or felt.
    • Texture Examples: Coarse Medium Fine Smooth Rough Glossy Dull
    • Plant Texture Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Principles of Design The principles of design are concepts used to organise the elements of design.
    • Contrast Contrast adds interest and can be achieved using various design elements Examples Colour Form Texture
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Rhythm Rhythm is achieved when the elements of design create a feeling of motion which leads the viewer’s eye through the design. Examples: Colour Line Form
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Rhythm As a creator of a plant display you will be able to evoke a feeling of ordered rhythm and purpose when the same theme, feature or pattern is repeated in a design.
    • Line Line is related to eye movement or flow. Line is also created vertically by changes in plant height. Straight lines tend to be forceful and direct the eye to a point faster than curved lines. Curved or free-flowing lines are graceful and gentle, creating a relaxing more natural feeling.
    • Line is created by the way that plants fit or flow together Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Balance Balance refers to the balance of visual attraction. Symmetrical balance is achieved when one side of the design is a mirror image of the other side. Asymetrical balance uses different design elements to balance visual attraction
    • Balance refers to equilibrium or equity of visual attraction Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Scale Scale refers to the size of the design in relation to the surroundings.
    • The size of plantings compared to human scale must be considered Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Proportion Proportion refers to the size of parts the design in relation to each other and to the design as a whole.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • One large tree may compliment an office building but dwarf a single storey house Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Focal Area and Emphasis Focal Area or Focalisation involves leading of visual observation towards a feature by placement of this feature at the vanisihing point between lines. Straight lines create stonger focalisation than curved lines.
    • Straight lines create strong focalisation when compared to curved lines Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Emphasis (top) or Focalise (bottom) Source: ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Dewayne L. Ingram
    • Repetition Repetition refers to the repeated use of features like plant or objects that share an identical shape, line, form, color, and texture. If it is used well it will give a sense of unity.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Repetition Using too much repetition may create a sense of monotony. Too much variety in a display will create a cluttered,busy feel which is not relaxing.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Sequence Sequence is the repetition of similar but not identical plants, surfaces, colour or objects used in a display.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Simplicity Simplicity compliments repetition and is best achieved by getting rid of unnecessary detail.
    • Simplicity If a design contains too much detail or variety then it will evoke a feeling of confusion. If a designer can reduce a display to a simple yet functional and attractive design then the objective is fulfilled.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Unity Unity is the underlying principle that summarises all of the principles and elements of design.
    • Unity Unity is obtained by the effective use of components in a design to express a main idea through consistent style. Everything selected for a design must complement the central scheme and must, above all, serve some functional purpose.
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • Photo courtesy of Kim Thomas
    • References ‘Basic Principles of Landscape Design’ Ingram, D.L. ‘Art, Design, and Visual thinking’ Cornell University