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Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
Social Media and Your Career
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Social Media and Your Career

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An overview of what it takes to build a powerful online presence and differentiate yourself in the Twitterverse.

An overview of what it takes to build a powerful online presence and differentiate yourself in the Twitterverse.

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  • There are many, many tools. We are going to focus on the big ones.
  • In a brilliant post on nform.ca, information architect Gene Smith of the Atomiq.org blog outlined the 7 building blocks of social software. This pulls together the work of various people including Matt Webb and Stewart Butterfield and provides a framework that I think is valuable in thinking about social software.
    The 7 building blocks are:
    Identity – a way of uniquely identifying people in the system
    Presence – a way of knowing who is online, available or otherwise nearby
    Relationships – a way of describing how two users in the system are related (e.g. in Flickr, people can be contacts, friends of family)
    Conversations – a way of talking to other people through the system
    Groups – a way of forming communities of interest
    Reputation – a way of knowing the status of other people in the system (who’s a good citizen? who can be trusted?)
    Sharing – a way of sharing things that are meaningful to participants (like photos or videos)
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • Maven | Content Expert | “Ms. Google”
    Knowing industries and conversational currency
    Know the influencers and thought leaders
    You are like Google
    People follow you on Twitter and “Like” your News Feed and Group comments
    Connector | Organizer
    You know people who know people
    You know the meaning of “Friend”
    Bring people together to share touch-points
    Event-manager extraordinaire
    Polite, efficient moderator
    Salesperson
    Making deals
    Differentiating your personal brand
    You make things go viral*
    Do-gooder | “The Cause” Guy
    [INSERT CHARITY HERE]
    You get that non-profits get social media
    Know how to tell persuasive stories
    Insider | Side-door Manager
    [IAN INSERT’S IDEA HERE]
    Insider | Side-door Manager
    Already in the sector/field that you want to discuss online
    Know people professionally, socially and you’re on the inside-track – can introduce people and you know what’s happening before it happens.
  • Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, RSS Feeds – Manage your
  • A-Frame of Trust: http://knowledgefutures.wordpress.com/2007/05/20/the-a-frame-of-trust/
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • LinkedIn is the BEST way to raise your profile on Google. It’s an absolute must.
    Side door = people in your network who know other people. You MUST know a person (or get introduced) to get connected on LinkedIn. If you get 9 “I don’t know this person” results from people you ask to connect with your account is suspended indefinitely.
  • Twitter is 90% about researching. Why? Less than 10% of Twitter users generate 90% of the content. Think Mashable, Malcolm Gladwell, Bill Gates, HBR, etc.
    Job Postings are being posted on Twitter more and more. Are you interested in Social Media as a component of your career? You must be on Twitter.
  • The “Cisco Fatty” controversy. This young lady tweeted that she would be getting a “fatty” paycheck at Cisco, even though she would hate the work. Needless to say, Twitter found out about it.
  • In a brilliant post on nform.ca, information architect Gene Smith of the Atomiq.org blog outlined the 7 building blocks of social software. This pulls together the work of various people including Matt Webb and Stewart Butterfield and provides a framework that I think is valuable in thinking about social software.
    The 7 building blocks are:
    Identity – a way of uniquely identifying people in the system
    Presence – a way of knowing who is online, available or otherwise nearby
    Relationships – a way of describing how two users in the system are related (e.g. in Flickr, people can be contacts, friends of family)
    Conversations – a way of talking to other people through the system
    Groups – a way of forming communities of interest
    Reputation – a way of knowing the status of other people in the system (who’s a good citizen? who can be trusted?)
    Sharing – a way of sharing things that are meaningful to participants (like photos or videos)
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • A-Frame of Trust: http://knowledgefutures.wordpress.com/2007/05/20/the-a-frame-of-trust/
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • Before you put anything on Facebook – more than anywhere else – ask yourself this question: “What would my boss think about this? What would my mom think about this? What would my wife/husband/boyfriend/girlfriend/partner think about this?” Facebook is a small-town or village. Word will get around.
  • In a brilliant post on nform.ca, information architect Gene Smith of the Atomiq.org blog outlined the 7 building blocks of social software. This pulls together the work of various people including Matt Webb and Stewart Butterfield and provides a framework that I think is valuable in thinking about social software.
    The 7 building blocks are:
    Identity – a way of uniquely identifying people in the system
    Presence – a way of knowing who is online, available or otherwise nearby
    Relationships – a way of describing how two users in the system are related (e.g. in Flickr, people can be contacts, friends of family)
    Conversations – a way of talking to other people through the system
    Groups – a way of forming communities of interest
    Reputation – a way of knowing the status of other people in the system (who’s a good citizen? who can be trusted?)
    Sharing – a way of sharing things that are meaningful to participants (like photos or videos)
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • In a brilliant post on nform.ca, information architect Gene Smith of the Atomiq.org blog outlined the 7 building blocks of social software. This pulls together the work of various people including Matt Webb and Stewart Butterfield and provides a framework that I think is valuable in thinking about social software.
    The 7 building blocks are:
    Identity – a way of uniquely identifying people in the system
    Presence – a way of knowing who is online, available or otherwise nearby
    Relationships – a way of describing how two users in the system are related (e.g. in Flickr, people can be contacts, friends of family)
    Conversations – a way of talking to other people through the system
    Groups – a way of forming communities of interest
    Reputation – a way of knowing the status of other people in the system (who’s a good citizen? who can be trusted?)
    Sharing – a way of sharing things that are meaningful to participants (like photos or videos)
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • Blogs have to be about something. Seinfeld episodes are about nothing.
    Collaborate with several bloggers (ie. the Daily Gumboot’s model). Link to others. Comment on their article (show that
  • In a brilliant post on nform.ca, information architect Gene Smith of the Atomiq.org blog outlined the 7 building blocks of social software. This pulls together the work of various people including Matt Webb and Stewart Butterfield and provides a framework that I think is valuable in thinking about social software.
    The 7 building blocks are:
    Identity – a way of uniquely identifying people in the system
    Presence – a way of knowing who is online, available or otherwise nearby
    Relationships – a way of describing how two users in the system are related (e.g. in Flickr, people can be contacts, friends of family)
    Conversations – a way of talking to other people through the system
    Groups – a way of forming communities of interest
    Reputation – a way of knowing the status of other people in the system (who’s a good citizen? who can be trusted?)
    Sharing – a way of sharing things that are meaningful to participants (like photos or videos)
    Adventure – trust requires someone to be vulnerable in some way, of being open to something that might affect them and of the possibility of being hurt or embarrassed. 
    Agreement – trust requires an agreement between two or more people.  Trust can be lost when that agreement is broken.
    Authenticity – trust develops when people act with integrity, are true to their word, and are authentic in their dealings.
    Accountability – trust further develops when people understand that they will be held to account for their actions or inactions.
    Apology – in order to restore trust, there needs to be understanding that trust has been broken, that there could either be fault or at a minimum a serious difference of perspective, that a conflict has arisen which is best overcome through an apology.
    The arrangement of the five items in the A-Frame is intended.  Apology is the bridging device, Adventure and Accountability are the key supports, and agreement and authenticity help balance each other.
  • http://humanresources.about.com/b/2010/06/26/manage-social-media-job-references.htm
    Manage Social Media Job References
    Saturday June 26, 2010
    A colleague found herself in a heated discussion about whether employees writing references on social media sites such as LinkedIn violated company reference policies that prohibit employees from providing references, or official references, for former employees and colleagues. It is an interesting question given that any employer reading a reference on LinkedIn can easily determine the referring person's employer.
    In my ongoing crusade to separate the personal and professional lives of employees, those of you who have read this site for any time can probably predict my answer. Employees who write references for colleagues during their personal time, and do not imply that the reference is from the company, should not be subject to disciplinary action.
    But, I do recommend that you cover potential liability for your organization. Since courts are increasingly involved, ask your employees to state that the reference is personal and that they are not representing the view of the company, when they write references for work colleagues on social media sites.
    As an employer, I never regard a reference on a social media site as an official company reference. I recognize that a coworker's or friend's view may differ, even radically, from the view of the employer. So, a reference is just one more piece of information in my quest to hire superior employees.
    Agree? Disagree? What's your experience of references in social media such as LinkedIn? How do you use social media in your recruitment process? Do you research candidates online?
    Image Copyright Nancy Louie
  • Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, RSS Feeds – Manage your channels
  • Hootsuite, Tweetdeck, RSS Feeds – Manage your channels
  • Transcript

    • 1. Agenda 01 Learning Outcomes 02 Introduction 03 Data and Findings 04 Concepts: Research | Connecting | Dialogue 05 LinkedIn, Twitter, Blogs, Facebook, YouTube 06 Job Search Strategies
    • 2. By the end of this workshop, learners will be able to… 01 Identify the importance of social media as it relates to their job search and/or career development 02 Identify different kinds of social media communities and outline best practices for engaging them 03 Articulate how to use different mediums (ie. LinkedIn and YouTube) to research industries and influencers as well as deliver your value proposition 04 Outline short-term (ie. by December 2010) and long-term (ie. December 2015) strategies for incorporating social media into your professional toolkit
    • 3. Data and Findings Why do we care about social media? “Today, it’s called ‘social media’. In a matter of years it might just be called ‘media’ and we will use it in every aspect of our professional lives.” Source: Paul Cubbon, Instructor at the Sauder School of Business
    • 4. • What are you using? • What is working? • What isn't working? WHO IS USING WHAT?
    • 5. Conversations vs. Broadcasting
    • 6. The seven building blocks of the social web are presence, relationships, sharing, identity, reputation, conversations, and groups. In “careerspeak” you need to think about three important categories… • Research | learn about industries and influencers • Promotion | be a maven who creates a buzz • Connecting | bring together people and ideas Inspirational YouTube Video | The Social Media Revolution
    • 7. Social Media and Your Job Search Source: nform.ca – Gene Smith, Matt Webb and Stewart Butterfield
    • 8. Social Media and Your Job Search Choose Your Role(s) • Maven | Content Expert | “Ms. Google” • Connector | Organizer • Salesperson • Do-gooder | “The Cause” Guy • Insider | Side-door Manager • Other Source: Ian Christie, boldcareer.com
    • 9. “What Role is Right for me?”
    • 10. Mastering Social Mediums “Which tool is right for me?” “When you commit to being your real self online, you discover parts of yourself you never dared to share offline. When you visualize the real person you're about to e-mail or tweet, you bring human qualities of attention and empathy to your online communications.” - Alexandra Samuel, “ 10 Reasons to Stop Apologizing for Your Online Life”
    • 11. ©Copyright Rob Cottingham
    • 12. Social Media and Your Job Search REMEMBER: THE A-FRAME OF TRUST
    • 13. Agreement Accountability Authenticity Apology Adventure Source: www.knowledgefutures.wordpress.com
    • 14. LinkedIn is a must for twenty-first century businesspeople! It combines research, promotion and connecting in ways that will powerfully influence your career. • Research | people, companies, industries, trends • Promotion | sync it, raise your Page Rank, launch ideas • Connecting | side door, groups and always after networking
    • 15. LinkedIn Resources | Tips from The Experts AWESOME TIPS | Do these three things… 1. Write unique invitations to connect every time 2. Get recommended – no shameless mutual-recommending 3. Cross-pollinate | Twitter, Amazon.com, Blogs, Groups, Trippit AWESOME RESOURCES | Follow these links… • Research Tips from Guy Kawasaki | link here • LinkedIn Webinars (Amazing) | link here • “I’m on LinkedIn…Now What?!” | link here • How to Rank #1 on LinkedIn | link here • Career Success & LinkedIn | link here
    • 16. LinkedIn | Discuss 1. What kind of community is LinkedIn? 2. How can you use it to research, promote and connect? 3. Beginning tomorrow, how will you use this resource differently? 4. Is LinkedIn the right social media tool for me?
    • 17. Twitter is one of the best primary research tools on the internet! Follow thought-leaders, influencers and makers of conversational currency. • Research | @HarvardBIZ @BCBusiness @globeandmail • Promotion | create value in 140 characters, know bit.ly • Connecting | mention and direct-message people
    • 18. Social Media and Your Job Search
    • 19. Twitter Resources | Tips from The Experts AWESOME TIPS | Do these three things… 1. Always give credit when you share a link – be genuine! 2. Diversify your content (ie. re-tweet, share links, be interesting) 3. Use Tweetdeck or Hootsuite and get organized AWESOME RESOURCES | Follow these links… • Twitter and Your Job Search | link here • Twitter Apps and Tools | link here • A Brief Twitter Etiquette Guide | link here • Leverage Twitter for Your Career | link here • Mashable: Find a Job on Twitter | link here • Are you “Tweeting too Hard”? | link here
    • 20. Twitter | Discuss 1. What kind of community is Twitter? 2. How can you use it to research, promote and connect? 3. Beginning tomorrow, how will you use this resource differently? 4. Is Twitter the right social media tool for me?
    • 21. Facebook is the social networking supersite! It is personal before it’s professional, but there’s no better place to get a powerful reputation. • Research | populate your News Feed with great ideas • Promotion | count your “Likes” – do you add value? • Connecting | connect around common causes and concepts
    • 22. Social Media and Your Job Search
    • 23. Facebook Resources | Tips from The Experts AWESOME TIPS | Do these three things… 1. Audit your account, manage settings and create layers of privacy 2. Ask questions and give as much as you get 3. Be Yourself (but not too much) AWESOME RESOURCES | Follow these links… • How to Lose a Job with Facebook | link here • How to Build Your Brand with Facebook | link here • “Cool” Video about Facebook | link here • Managing Your Online Presence | link here • Facebook Horror Stories | link here
    • 24. Facebook | Discuss 1. What kind of community is Facebook? 2. How can you use it to research, promote and connect? 3. Beginning tomorrow, how will you use this resource differently? 4. Is Facebook the right social media tool for me?
    • 25. YouTube is the second-biggest search engine on the Internet! Research by watching videos. Promote yourself with polished professional digital storytelling. • Research | more than just distractions, like Flight of the Concords • Promotion | two words: “video resume” • Connecting | who subscribes to your channel?
    • 26. YouTube Resources | Tips from The Experts AWESOME TIPS | Do these three things… 1. Subscribe to your favorite YouTube channels 2. Edutain yourself with great research, like “Did You Know?” 3. Promote yourself! But only if it’s not crap AWESOME RESOURCES | Follow these links… • A Professional MBA Digital Story | link here • Another Video Resume | link here • Video Tips for Your Job Search | link here • How to Have a Successful YouTube Career | link here • Entertain Yourself | link here
    • 27. YouTube | Discuss 1. What kind of community is YouTube? 2. How can you use it to research, promote and connect? 3. Beginning tomorrow, how will you use this resource differently? 4. Is YouTube the right social media tool for me?
    • 28. A blog is the best portal for your online presence! DISCLAIMER!!! Not everyone should have a blog – you must have something interesting to say. • Research | focus your attention (ie. industry, idea or location) • Promotion | 250-300 words; it’s not a Seinfeld episode • Connecting | make Link Love, share content, collaborate
    • 29. Blogging Resources | Tips from The Experts AWESOME TIPS | Do these three things… 1. Keep the daily content concise, creative and (politely) controversial 2. Spend money to look professional 3. Know your channels: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Social Bookmarks AWESOME RESOURCES | Follow these links… • To Blog or not to Blog | link here • Blogging for your Job Search (ABC News) | link here • Five Tips for Selecting the Right Blogging Platform | link here • 10 Tips for Bloggers | link here
    • 30. Your Blog | Discuss 1. What kind of community is your blog? 2. How can you use it to research, promote and connect? 3. If you were to create a blog tomorrow, what would it look and feel like? 4. Is a blog the right social media tool for me?
    • 31. Other Tools, Widgets and Mediums • Ning • Digg • De.licio.us • StumbleUpon • Flickr • 101 Tips and Resources for Marketing Yourself Online (You’re Welcome!) • How to use your Smartphone to build your personal brand (click here)
    • 32. Social Media Strategies Short and Long-Term Career Planning Social Media and Your Job Search “By creating compelling content, you can become a celebrity.” -Paul Gillin
    • 33. Social Media and Your Job Search Managing your references and knowing who says what about you is a crucial part of your social media job search strategy. Know Your Corporate Policy • Is recommending on LinkedIn a best practice? • The long-term digital footprint of endorsing someone • Who is your “Friend”? • Over 85% of recruiters Googled candidates last year Source: Ian Christie, boldcareer.com
    • 34. What three apps will you use? How will you use them? Social Media and Your Job Search
    • 35. SHORT-TERM Social Media Career Strategy
    • 36. Over the next 6-10 months expanding your social media presence should be a top priority. Research, Promote, Connect • Complete your LinkedIn Profile, including recommendations • Build conversational currency by who and what you follow • Find the new places where opportunities are announced • Get a reputation by being a connective, positive giver
    • 37. Choose Your Role(s) • Maven • Connector • Salesperson • Do-gooder • Insider • Other
    • 38. THREE WORDS
    • 39. Create New Tracks
    • 40. S.E.O.
    • 41. LONG-TERM Social Media Career Strategy
    • 42. Social Media and Your Job Search Over the next five years sustaining and polishing your social network will ensure that your name appears when your industry, skills and geographic location are mentioned. Research, Promote, Connect • Manage your 15,000 connections • Top three [INSERT YOUR NAME HERE]s on Google • You are sought out, found and approached • Bring others up to your level; make everyone better
    • 43. Choose Your Role(s) • Maven • Connector • Salesperson • Do-gooder • Insider • Other
    • 44. ONE WORD
    • 45. “Ping”
    • 46. REMEMBER There will always be a new medium
    • 47. In conclusion…
    • 48. THREE THINGS 1. Choose your Community 2. Know your Role 3. Ping | Make New Tracks
    • 49. Thank You!

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