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Family gatherings tip sheet
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Family gatherings tip sheet

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Family gatherings can be the most difficult of trips. The main challenges will be expectations about how you and your child should behave, houses that are not child-proofed, and the high level of …

Family gatherings can be the most difficult of trips. The main challenges will be expectations about how you and your child should behave, houses that are not child-proofed, and the high level of social interaction directed at your child. Children with taste sensitivities may also not like any of the food prepared.

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  • 1. Family Gatherings Family gatherings can be the most difficult of trips. The main challenges will beexpectations about how you and your child should behave, houses that are not child-proofed, and the high level of social interaction directed at your child. Children with tastesensitivities may also not like any of the food prepared. 1. Travel, if possible, in two cars. One parent can return home with your child if he gets distressed and the rest of the family can stay. 2. Feed your child ahead of time. A fed child is better behaved than a hungry one. 3. Allay concerns that your child doesn’t eat enough by explaining that he already ate. 4. Bring food that your child will eat. 5. Feed your child in a separate room, if he was not fed ahead of time. 6. Come early before most of the people arrive. This lets your child get accustomed to the growing number of people rather then being there all at once. 7. Ask if you can remove breakable items from your child’s reach. 8. Avoid homes where people refuse to accommodate by doing even the simplest of child- proofing. This creates an inappropriate stress level on you and your child. 9. Pick a quiet place to go if your child becomes distressed. 10. Bring your child’s favorite toys or stuffed animals. 11. Show your child pictures of relatives and teach him their names. 12. Let others watch your child if they volunteer. You need the break. 13. Ask for help if you need it. Ask, “Could you watch him while I eat?” 14. Accept unwanted advice with the phrase, “I’ll have to think about that,” and smile. They really are trying to help. People cannot understand what it is like to live with autism until they experience it for themselves.Labosh, K. The Child with Autism Goes to Town: The Go Anywhere Guide-250 tips for Community Outings. Labosh Publishing. 2004