Best practices For Enterprise Social Media Management #SocialMediaDreamTeam
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Best practices For Enterprise Social Media Management #SocialMediaDreamTeam

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Mejores prácticas para planear e implementar Social Media por nuestro equipo de Redes Sociales All-Star

Mejores prácticas para planear e implementar Social Media por nuestro equipo de Redes Sociales All-Star

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Best practices For Enterprise Social Media Management #SocialMediaDreamTeam Best practices For Enterprise Social Media Management #SocialMediaDreamTeam Document Transcript

  • Social@Scale WHAT 30 OF THE BEST MINDS IN SOCIAL THINK LARGE BRANDS MUST DO TO SUCCEED IN BEING SOCIAL AT SCALE. HOW TO PLAN AND DELIVER A GLOBAL SOCIAL MEDIA DEPLOYMENT, PG 2 HOW PREPARED ARE YOU TO BE SOCIAL@SCALE? FIND OUT NOW. TAKE THE READINESS ASSESSMENT, PG 58
  • Dedicated to those who share our mission to help every large enterprise be Social.
  • Table of Contents What is Social@Scale?...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 How to Plan and Deliver a Global Social Media Deployment ................................................................................. 2 The 6 “Must Haves” For Any Enterprise Social RFP ......................................................................................................... 3 SECTION 1: It’s Time to Start Thinking Social@Scale DAVID MEERMAN SCOTT ........................................................................................................................................................................ 6 The Real-Time Mindset: Don’t Use the Word “Social” DAVID ARMANO .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Social Business@Scale: Not If, But When MITCH JOEL .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Does Social Really Scale? MACK COLLIER ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Commitment to Change: Not Every Enterprise is Ready for Social@Scale JOSEPH JAFFE ..............................................................................................................................................................................................11 Social@Scale and Other Oxymorons MICHAEL BRITO .........................................................................................................................................................................................12 A Britopian View: Success Cannot Be Measured By Fans Alone ROHIT BHARGAVA .....................................................................................................................................................................................13 3 Tips For Scaling Likeability (And Why It Matters) NILOFER MERCHANT .............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 From 800 Lb Gorillas to 800 Gazelles TED COINE .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 15 The Social and The Extinct DAVID WEINBERGER ................................................................................................................................................................................ 16 The Internet is Not the Medium: WE are the Medium SHELLY PALMER ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 18 No Crystal Ball Required: The Future of Social Media is Now MARK EARLS ...........................................................................................................................................................................19 People Are Not Robots; Corporations Are Not Machines Either
  • Table of Contents cont’d. SECTION 2: Are you READY to be Social@Scale? Organization, Tools & Tactics RENEE BLODGET....................................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Achieving Social@Scale Means Getting Rid of Your Silos AUGIE RAY ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 23 Your Job is NOT to Raise Your Own Klout Score: Thinking Beyond Posts, Tweets, Games and Pins BRETT PETERSEL ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Time to Get Rid of Your Social Media Silos TED RUBIN .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 26 Return on Relationship: Why Companies Need to Embrace Social@Scale SECTION 3: Social@Scale Organizational Models SARAH EVANS ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 29 How to Scale the Social Media Corporate Team at the Enterprise Level JEFF BULLAS............................................................................................................................................................................................... 31 Why Social@Scale Shouldn’t Be Left to the Interns CHRIS BROGAN ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 33 Six Areas Where to Focus Your Social@Scale Energy JASON FALLS ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 35 Social Media Software is Only Part of the Equation JAY BAER ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 The 5 Critical Social Media Skills You Need to Disperse MATT DICKMAN ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 39 Social@Scale Begins With an Informed C-Suite
  • Table of Contents cont’d. SECTION 4: Content & Conversation to be Social@Scale VENKATESH RAO ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 Avoid Fake Relationships: Using Irony and Humor to Engage Contradictory Marketing Realities EDWARD BOCHES ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 44 7 Tips For Being Social And Doing It at Scale ANN HANDLEY .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 46 An Open Letter to C-Level Executives: How do we SCALE social? DOC SEARLS ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 48 The Personal Side of Social@Scale RICHARD STACY ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 50 The Value of Small Group Conversations: Why a ‘Platform for the Masses’ is Not the Same Thing as a ‘Mass Platform.’ AMY VERNON ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 52 You Have to Care SECTION 5: Branding in a Social@Scale World PETER SHANKMAN ................................................................................................................................................................................. 54 The Great Airport Steak-Out: How Morton’s Gets Its Customers to Scale Social for Them THOMAS BAEKDAL .................................................................................................................................................................................. 56 Is Your Brand Socially Compatible? Social@Scale Readiness Assessment .............................................................................................................................................. 58
  • What is Social@Scale? Combining cutting-edge technology, corporate governance, and a disciplined operational framework, Social@Scale enables brands to engage in a timely and relevant manner with their global audience from a single platform across multiple corporate functions in multiple social channels.
  • How to Plan and Deliver a Global Social Media Deployment 1 2 4 5 Map the Strategy 3 Define the business objectives and the specific set of social activities designed to meet those objectives. 1 2 4 5 Staff Up: Suggested Roles 3 GLOBAL: 1 1 social media executive 2 2 3 4 2 an implementation team REGIONAL: 1 1 social media director 2 2 an analyst LOCAL: 1 1 a community manager 4 a content manager 2 a social media manager 5 subject matter experts from marketing, HR, customer service &PR 3 a reporting manager 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 Plan to Operate 3 1. Activity plan by role 2. Rules of conduct 3. Activations 4. Sunsetting & Deactivations 5. Best practices 5 4 2 3 4 5 Consistently Brand 1. Online social brand style guide for look 2. Detailed guidelines for brand feel 5 Measure Social 1. Campaign Effectiveness 2. Audience Engagement 3. Reach Business 1. Response Times 2. Voice of the Customer 3. NPS 4. Attributable eCommerce Revenue SOCIAL@SCALE | 2
  • The 6 “Must Haves” For Any Enterprise Social RFP 1 Multi-Channel Management Manage conversations across ALL social channels Collaboration among multiple functional units Support for new & international networks Automated & customizable rules, filters, and actions Native design for multiple channels 3 Architecture to support volume spikes Multi-country and multi-language deployments 5 Workflow, routing, queues, notifications, and escalations Social Governance 4 Scalability Natural Language Processing to manage large message volume Customized Reporting Measure engagement, response times, dispersion 2 Cross-Functional Capabilities RFP Global user access, permission, approvers, and password management Audit trails, digital asset management, calendaring, templates Legal Rapid Product Enhancements 6 Frequency of new product feature releases Ability to support custom development Connect social activity to business results Integration with existing analytics tools Message categorization at a granular level VERSIO 2.0 N SOCIAL@SCALE | 3
  • SECTION 1 It’s Time to Start Thinking Social@Scale
  • David Meerman Scott is a marketing strategist, advisor to emerging companies, keynote speaker, and an international bestselling author of eight books including “Real-Time Marketing & PR” and “Newsjacking.” His books have been translated into 30 languages. You can follow David on Twitter @dmscott or at his personal blog, Web Ink Now. The Real-Time Mindset: Don’t Use the Word “Social” BY DAVID MEERMAN SCOTT When I speak with executives around the world about social, many think of their kids’ Facebook or Twitter and what you had for lunch, deciding that social is frivolous at best and a dangerous time-waster at worst. In order to scale social, I recommend not using the word “social” at all and instead substitute “real-time” An immensely powerful competitive advantage flows to organizations with people who understand the power of realtime information. What are people doing on your site right now? Has someone just praised you on Facebook? Panned you on Twitter? Published a how-to video about your product on YouTube? Executives understand real-time and are eager to implement the ideas. “Recognize your employees as responsible adults. Empower them to take initiative.” Conventional vs. Real-Time The conventional business approach favors a campaign (note the war metaphor) that requires people to spend weeks or months planning to hit targets. Agencies must be consulted. Messaging strategies must be developed. Advertising space/time must be bought. Conference rooms and refreshments must be prepared for press conferences. Do you serve them sushi or sandwiches? The real-time mindset recognizes the importance of speed. It is an attitude to business (and to life) that emphasizes moving quickly when the time is right. Developing a real-time mindset is not an either/or proposition. I’m not saying you should abandon your current businessplanning process. Nor do I advocate allowing your team to run off barking at every car that drives by. Focus and collaboration are essential. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 5
  • The Real-Time Mindset: cont’d. Large Organizations Need to Work at It The more people you have in an organization, the tougher it is to communicate in real time. In a command-and-control environment where no action can be taken without authority, without consultation, without due process, any individual who shows initiative can expect to be squashed. The challenge is to develop a new balance that empowers employee initiative but offers real-time guidance when it’s needed—like a hotline to higher authority. In a real-time corporate culture, everyone is recognized as a responsible adult. If you’re the leader, and you want to cultivate a real-time mindset throughout your organization, tear down the command-and-control mentality. Recognize your employees as responsible adults. Empower them to take initiative. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 6
  • David Armano is Editor-in-Chief of EdelmanDigital.com and Edelman’s Executive Vice President -- Global Innovation & Integration. David previously was a founder of the social business consultancy Dachis Group, helping launch the business from stealth mode into the marketplace. He regularly writes industry perspectives for the Harvard Business Review, and co-founded the “Allhat” event -- billed by SXSW as populated by “the most respected voices in digital.” You can follow David on Twitter @armano or at his Logic + Emotion blog. Social Business: Not If, But When BY DAVID ARMANO Do you remember webmasters? This was a real title at one point in the corporate world created many years ago to support something we called the “website,” a digital manifestation of your company. The problem with webmasters was that as generalists who could wear multiple hats -- coding, writing, designing and managing one or more sites -- they as single individuals could not scale. Today, we are rapidly moving toward an era of Social Business@Scale, which loosely translates to an organization’s ability to integrate social technology and behavior internally and externally. Why? Because much like “digital” before it, “social” promises to empower both consumers and employees alike leading to positive business outcomes for the organizations which figure out how to crack the social code. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 7
  • Social Business: Not If, But When cont’d. The big question now is not IF social can scale, but when and how. To answer that, let’s look back at yesterday’s webmasters who were replaced by teams, systems and new processes -- all designed for scale. We can also look back at the leaders of yesterday: the CIOs and CMOs who made digital a priority and led efforts in e-commerce or ambitious corporate global website rollouts. Lastly, let’s recall those who embraced a digital culture, individuals who spent countless hours “surfing” the information highway and living a digital lifestyle. How will social business scale? It will have something to do with “the three P’s” of change management. Changes in People (culture, job descriptions), Process (systems and workflow), and Platforms (technology) will need to take place in order for social to be woven into the fabric of an organization. “... much like ‘digital’ before it, ‘ social’ promises to empower both consumers and employees alike...” Much like yesterday’s webmasters, today’s community managers represent the first wave of social, a newly created position designed to deal with a social web. But community managers alone can’t scale and a social business can’t be built overnight. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 8
  • Mitch Joel is President of Twist Image and the author of the best-selling business book, “Six Pixels of Separation.” His next book, “CTRL ALT DEL - Reboot Your Business (and Yourself ) in a Connected World,” will be published in Spring 2013. You can follow Mitch on Twitter @mitchjoel or at his Six Pixels of Separation blog. Does Social Really Scale? BY MITCH JOEL That’s the real question and that’s the question that organizations are going to have to hunker down and start thinking about moving forward. At first, social media was all about making sure that you can respond to customer and client needs in a timely (and public!) manner. Now that we live in a world where close to one billion people are connected on Facebook alone, things are going to change. Enter the brave new Era of Social Business, where we are all -- including everyone from the President down to the receptionist -- moving from a hierarchical response-andmeasure infrastructure to a much more non-hierarchical structure. We’re now all responsible for how we communicate – both internally and externally. We’re seeing companies like Oracle and Salesforce invest in and acquire (at an alarming rate) businesses that are able to help their people be more social. Sadly, many people still think that social is about the conversation. It isn’t. “Social is the act of making all of the material that a company produces more shareable and findable.” Social is the act of making all of the material that a company produces more shareable and findable. When what you do – as a business – is more shareable and findable, people will do something very social with it. They’ll share it, comment on it, create content around it and engage with you and your business. If you can master that one little (but vastly important) nuance, you will begin to see what happens when a company becomes social. Then you can make it scale with the right tools, philosophical approach, and more importantly… the right people. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 9
  • Based in Alabama, Mack Collier is a social media strategist, trainer and speaker who specializes in helping companies better connect with their customers via social media. He is also the founder and moderater of #Blogchat, the largest Twitter Chat on the internet, where thousands of people meet each Sunday night to discuss a different blogging topic. His first business book, “Think Like A Rockstar: How to Create Social Media and Marketing Strategies That Turn Customers Into Fans,” will be published in 2013. You can follow Mack on Twitter @MackCollier or at his personal blog. Commitment to Change: Not Every Enterprise is Ready for Social@Scale BY MACK COLLIER Before a large organization can scale social across itself, it needs to make two commitments: 1. It must create a continuous feedback loop between its customers and itself, where the organization and its customers have direct channels of communication. A “quick and dirty” method of accomplishing this is via robust social media presences, but it needs to go beyond that. There needs to be mechanisms in place both internally within the enterprise and externally among the customers that facilitate and encourage the flow of information in both directions. 2. It must create an internal structure that can not only glean relevant customer and company insights, but also distribute those insights to the appropriate areas of the company so it can act on that information. This is why there’s been so much talk in recent years of removing the “silos” within organizations, and more free-sharing of information. The problem is that these two commitments will require an extensive financial commitment from the average enterprise, and many won’t follow through unless they can see a clear benefit. The average large organization won’t commit to making these necessary changes until they better understand the value realized from better connections with their customers (and employees), especially via emerging social and mobile technologies. When companies begin to move away from trying to directly extract sales from customers (via traditional marketing) to understanding that creating value for customers will indirectly lead to sales, then we’ll begin to see the necessary changes take place both internally and externally. “There needs to be mechanisms in place both internally... and externally among the customers that facilitate and encourage the flow of information in both directions.” But these changes will come very slowly for many large organizations. Cultures that take decades to form don’t typically turn around overnight. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 10
  • Joseph Jaffe is Founder & Partner of Evol8tion, LLC, an innovation agency that matches early stage startups with established brands to partner via mentoring, pilot programs, investment and/or acquisition. In 2009, he launched his first foray into video in the form of JaffeJuiceTV -- in an effort to prove once and for all that he does not have a face for radio. You can follow Joseph on Twitter @jaffejuice or at his “Jaffe Juice” blog and audio podcast. Social@Scale and Other Oxymorons BY JOSEPH JAFFE “Social Media” – it’s a contradiction at best and oxymoron at worst; or perhaps I should say transferred epithet, while I’m splitting grammatical hairs. And the moron in question is anyone who is using it incorrectly. “Social” = You and I grabbing a beer after work. “Media” = The artificially created and contrived term created by us to repetitively hit our “prospects” or targets over the head with a blunt object called advertising or paid media. “Social” + “Media” aka Oil + Water = “Social Media.” I like to refer social media as “non media.” Not paid media; not earned media; not owned media, but non-media. It is the power of peer-to-peer; human-to-human connections. Influence. Advocacy. Referrals. Credible customer-centric endorsements. Yes, even word-of-mouth. “the real role of social media is retention.” I believe that the real role of social media is retention. I also do believe that social can scale. It can get to scale with the same outcome as marketers so desperately covet and desire, BUT there’s an entirely different route that needs to be taken. Social@Scale comes via a combination of two approaches: 1. Reaggregation -- I share this term with my colleague, Rishad Tobaccowala. It is a bottom-up approach that is diametrically opposed to the carpet-bombing, top-down incumbent method. From the few comes the many. 2. Combining Technology and Humanity -- We’re very good at using technology to automate, streamline and simplify, but the real challenge is how to scale humanity -- that is, how to use technology to achieve scale without losing our souls in the process. Put the two together and we might just have a fighting chance of figuring out the sweet spot of new marketing, which represents a win-win for both our consumers (authentic, credible and transparent connections) and shareholders (economies of scale, critical mass and real business outcomes). Simple, right? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 11
  • Michael Brito is a Senior Vice President of Social Business Planning at Edelman Digital. He provides strategic counsel, guidance, and best practices to several of Edelman’s top global tech accounts and is responsible for helping transform their organizations to be more open, collaborative and socially proficient -- with the end result of creating shared value with employees, partners and customers. You can follow Michael on Twitter @Britopian or at his Britopian blog. A Britopian View: Success Cannot Be Measured By Fans Alone BY MICHAEL BRITO Social media is not just about friends, fans and followers. There is certainly some validity to this thinking because our minds have been trained to focus on outcomes. If done right, implementing smart social media initiatives such as community engagement, advocacy/influencer management, a Facebook sponsored story or a Promoted Tweet will increase community growth. Yes, that’s a good thing. But there is so much more to it. Problems arise when we don’t think about the possible implications that this bright and shiny object called “social media” can cause. Issues usually include: * Disjointed Content * How to Scale Programs Globally * Confusion of Roles & Responsibilities This is not hype and not a scare tactic. These are real issues that plague business today. “Problems arise when we don’t think about the possible implications that this bright and shiny object called ‘social media’ can cause.” Social business can be compared to building a house. Organizations must focus on the infrastructure first and operationalize their content marketing and community management, build governance models and create workflows that address customer support integration. The last thing you want to do is hang dry wall AFTER it is painted, right? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 12
  • Rohit Bhargava Bhargava is Senior Vice President of Global Strategy at Ogilvy and the best selling author of the new book, “Likeonomics,” which illustrates why we do business with people we like and how any brand can profit from being more likeable. You can follow Rohit on Twitter @rohitbhargava or at his Influential Marketing Blog 3 Tips For Scaling Likeability (And Why It Matters) BY ROHIT BHARGAVA By now you’ve heard the predictions that social media is reinventing business, or products, or customers. In the midst of all this “reinvention,” however, is the not-so-trivial challenge of delivering a great product or service. We are often taught that if we get the product or service right, everything else takes care of itself. The only problem is that it doesn’t really work that way. Satisfied customers leave all the time because they have no real reason to stay. Satisfaction isn’t the same thing as loyalty. Social media can help by answering the most important customer questions, delighting them, and offering more than just a satisfactory experience. Organizations that use social media effectively understand this, but there are still some big challenges. Ownership is one. Who is really in charge of it? Who will answer that tweet on a Sunday afternoon? Just as important is scalability. How do you scale something as elusive as “likeability?” There are plenty of benefits of likeability for your brand, from increased customer loyalty to the ability to encourage more proactive word of mouth and referrals. Customers stay loyal to brands that they have a deeper personal relationship with. Here are a few tips for scaling this likeability for your brand: 1. Encourage Humanity: People identify with brands that treat them like real people, so skip the terms and conditions and make it a priority for your people to engage with customers in more meaningful ways. 2. Identify the Creators: In every organization you have people who are passionate about creating content of all sorts. Often they come from areas outside marketing. Conduct an internal search to find this passion, and you can often scale your team from within. 3. Simplify the Tools: Using platforms to manage social media offer great value, as long as you make sure they are simple enough that anyone in your organization can use them to contribute. “People identify with brands that treat them like real people” SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 13
  • Nilofer Merchant inspires fearless cultures. When fear rules, ideas are stifled, innovation stagnates. Remove that fear and you’ll see people thrive. Fearlessness brings results. Nilofer’s career began at Apple and she has since been a CEO, run Fortune 500 companies, led successful start-ups, and launched over 100 products that account for $18B in revenues. She’s also written O’Reilly’s most successful business book to date, “The New How: Creating Business Solutions Through Collaborative Strategy.” In her work, she helps organizations close the Air Sandwich, the proverbial gap between strategy and execution. You can follow Nilofer on Twitter @nilofer or at her “Yes And No: Sparks For Innovators” blog. From 800 Lb Gorillas to 800 Gazelles BY NILOFER MERCHANT “Size matters.” This is just one of five legacies that traditional strategy taught us that no longer apply in the Social Era. And, it is simply wrong for leaders of organizations to continue to rely on this (and other) passé ideas. Yet, too many still do. It is the reason that the 800 lb gorillas of our days -- including banking and finance, automotive, energy, agriculture, and IT – are dying or failing in tectonic ways. Social allows us to do something entirely differently. But before we can, we have to disaggregate two words – social is not always attached to the word media. Social can be a way to operate all parts of the business model, from what we create, to how we deliver, and also how to reach markets. It’s not enough to do what we did yesterday incrementally better. Until we collectively stop thinking of Social as some way to do x incrementally better, we’re never going to redesign the enterprise. To patch Social onto the existing enterprise means a programmatic approach. But to use Social for a strategic redesign, well, you have to have the ability to meet the rapidly changing demands of a volatile and global marketplace. “The #SocialEra has new rules: scale happens by being connected with community.” Scale in the old era meant being big. That’s why we celebrated the 800-Lb Gorilla. But the #SocialEra has new rules – and clearly a new truth – scale happens by being connected with community. Social@Scale will look more like 800 Gazelles – nimbly forming into tribes and being fast/fluid/flexible to act and engage with the market. This will lead to more than “winning,” it will lead to thriving organizations. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 14
  • Ted Coine is one of the most influential business leaders online and is recognized on the Forbes list of Top 50 “Power Influencers” in Social Media. He is currently writing his third book, about how social media is changing business leadership as we know it. You can follow Ted on Twitter @tedcoine or at his Switch and Shift blog. The Social and The Extinct BY TED COINE What is Social@Scale for the enterprise? That’s simple: How many employees do you have? That’s how large your social media staff can be. Simple, yes, but not necessarily easy. So here are a few tips to make sure you’re headed in the right direction. 1. Craft a social media policy that fits your culture. Is your culture controlling or enabling? Your policy must fit your culture or you’re headed for trouble. 2. Which department should “own” social? Marketing? PR? Customer Service? R&D? Recruiting? Executive Leadership? The savvy enterprise will answer “all of the above – and more!” 3. Train, enable, and connect everyone. See what they come up with. Social is by definition a bottom-up endeavor. “If you don’t get social integrated throughout your enterprise and infused in your culture ASAP no other advice , will matter.” 4. Meet your audience where it already is, and engage in conversation, not broadcasting. Think of it this way: SOCIAL (media). 5. Whatever technology you use to manage across social platforms, make sure it’s nimble enough to add new ones as they gain popularity – even several times a year, as necessary. Finally, a word of warning because my main area of expertise is C-level leadership rather than media old or new: If you don’t get social integrated throughout your enterprise and infused in your culture ASAP, no other advice will matter. Social is changing everything about how business is done. Everything. Leaders who ignore that do so at their own peril. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 15
  • A frequent commentator on NPR, David Weinberger is a senior researcher at Harvard Law’s Berkman Center for the Internet & Society and Co-Director of the Harvard Library Innovation Lab at Harvard Law School. He also is the author of “Too Big to Know,” and the co-author of “The Cluetrain Manifesto.” Under the radar, David also wrote seven years worth of gags for Woody Allen’s comic strip, but was never asked to make a cameo in any of his movies. You can follow David on Twitter @dweinberger or at his personal blog, Joho. The Internet is Not the Medium: WE are the Medium BY DAVID WEINBERGER “Social@Scale” until recently was a contradiction. We assumed the more social ties you had, the weaker they became -- until you were down to people whose names you can’t quite remember. But the Net is a swirl of sociality that can go from zeroto-intimate in nanoseconds. And each new relationship can be the start of something that builds, can fall away forever, or can be there as a possibility for another unexpected fling. Sociality thus doesn’t work the way we assumed it did. New possibilities are emerging. And this is for three key reasons. First, the Net connects us all — well, a couple of billion of us. Second, it enables a flourishing of innovative ways of being social. (How often in our history could we have said that? Wait, I know! This once!) Third, the Internet is not a medium. A telegraph wire is a medium for dots and dashes: messages are sent through it. The Net’s not like that. Messages pass through the Internet because we -- the people on the Internet -- find them interesting enough to send along. Telegraph wires don’t get to send only the dots and dashes they happen to care about. And telegraph wires don’t see their social standing go up or down based upon the messages they pass. The Internet is not a medium. We are the medium. Because of this, when businesses try to push their own messages through the Net, it is worse than ineffective. It is offensive. The Net manages to provide scale based on intimacy. It does this by enabling connections that express what matters to us. Messaging of the marketing sort corrodes intimacy. “When businesses try to push their own messages through the Net, it is worse than ineffective - it is offensive.” cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 16
  • The Internet is Not the Medium: WE are the Medium cont’d. So what should businesses do? 1. Don’t talk unless what you say will improve the conversation. 2. Since hierarchies don’t interact well with networks, the people who speak for you on the Net need also to be speaking for themselves as honest-to-God humans with names and faces -- people who put the value of the conversation and the interests of your customers ahead of the narrow interests of your business. We’re building something wonderful here. Corrupt it at your peril. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 17
  • Shelly Palmer is the host of Fox Television’s Shelly Palmer Digital Living, the author of “Overcoming The Digital Divide: How to Use Social Media and Digital Tools to Reinvent Yourself and Your Career” (York House Press 2011) and the founder of Shelly Palmer Digital Leadership, an industry-leading advisory and business development firm. You can follow Shelly on Twitter @shellypalmer or at his Digital Leadership blog. No Crystal Ball Required: The Future of Social Media is Now BY SHELLY PALMER According to Cisco, by 2015 there will be more than 15 billion connected devices in the world. Even if this number is an overestimation, it is virtually certain that tomorrow there will be many more connected devices than there are today. Intel projects that this trend will continue until over 4 billion people have access to the Internet somewhere around 2020. No crystal ball is needed to see the future of social media. Metcalfe’s Law tells us that with each connection, the value of our network increases. This is an immutable fact of the future, but it is also a challenge. As the network grows, so will its power to amplify the speed and scale of any message -- good or bad. It is incumbent upon today’s digital leaders to make every effort to prepare for the exponential growth of social media. The capability to interpret and act upon millions of messages in real time is not a thing of the future, it is a necessity of the present. In my professional experience, I have found that businesspeople are generally extremely smart, but bureaucracies are generally extremely stupid. The challenge is to integrate a scalable, interactive, real-time social media processing mechanism into a large number of bureaucratically-built legacy systems, and then socialize its use company-wide. This may take a while. The good news is that the tools exist. All you have to do is choose a best practices suite of solutions. What’s the bad news? There is none, I’m optimistic about the future and the evolution of Social@Scale. “The capability to interpret and act upon millions of messages in real time is not a thing of the future, it is a necessity of the present.” SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 18
  • Mark Earls is one of the marketing world’s leading experts on human behavior and behavior change. Mark is the author of “Welcome to the Creative Age: Bananas, Business and the Death of Marketing,” “HERD: How to Change Mass Behavior by Harnessing Our True Nature,” and “I’ll Have What She’s Having.” In the last few years, he has advised a wide range of organizations around the world including: Sony Corporation, Greenpeace, Unilever, The School of Life, Channel 4 TV, and the UK’s Royal Mail. You can follow Mark on Twitter @herdmeister or at his personal blog. People Are Not Robots; Corporations Are Not Machines Either BY MARK EARLS The single biggest challenge for any business leader pondering the pros and cons of this social revolution is human-shaped. Let’s be honest, the technology itself is banal and easy to learn to use, to track and to interpret – it is in different forms already part of our personal lives. And there are – as you’d expect – lots of folks willing to take your money in order to explain how to use the technology to the nth degree (not all of these are snake-oil salesmen, mind you). No, the biggest challenge for all of us lies in the humans who use the technology and the (largely false) assumptions we hold about those people. People are not like machines. They are not individual independent utility-calculating robots – they are much smarter than that. Humans are fundamentally social creatures who live their lives in the company of others, more often than not making choices based on what those around them do and say. They outsource cognitive load, using the brains of those around them to store, recall and decide. “One of the reasons that these social technologies are being so readily adopted by our consumers and customers is that they feel natural.” One of the reasons that these social technologies are being so readily adopted by our consumers and customers is that they feel natural. They serve to amplify a central part of our humanity: our super social nature. Mass adoption of social tools means that while it may seem simple to think about “the consumer,” it is very rarely “the” anymore. A similar misunderstanding of the people thing is visible inside most organizations – we imagine corporations are like machines that are improvable and perfectible. That’s why management consultants so like the idea of “[re-]engineering” businesses. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 19
  • People Are Not Robots; Corporations Are Not Machines Either cont’d. But corporations aren’t machines and thinking about them as if they were misses the point, too. Corporations are built on people like those who live outside and buy its products and services. It is the degree to which you manage to get them to do so successfully which is the source of much contemporary competitive advantage. This is one of the main reasons why the notion of organizational “purpose” has gained traction at the same time as the social revolution has blossomed. Purpose gives people something to engage with and something to rally around. Whether you’re thinking about inside or outside the organization, the social aspect of our humanity is fundamental to any organization’s success. It makes things messier, more unpredictable and more prone to cascades of irrationality and enthusiasm than we’ve been used to. And as too many corporate horror stories attest, it makes businesses much more vulnerable to sustained criticism. Or to be more precise, it reveals how things have long been while we were hiding behind our “engineering” metaphors. “Organizational ‘purpose’ has gained traction at the same time as the social revolution has blossomed.” No, the biggest problem doesn’t lie with them (customers, employees etc) but with us and our ideas and our default settings. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 20
  • SECTION 2 Are you READY to be Social@Scale? ORGANIZATION, TOOLS & TACTICS
  • Renee Blodgett is the founder of Magic Sauce Media, a new media services consultancy focused on viral marketing, social media, branding, events and PR. For over 20 years, she has helped companies from 12 countries get traction in the market. Renee is also the founder of We Blog the World, an online culture and travel magazine, and regularly blogs at “Down the Avenue.” She was ranked the #12 Social Media Influencer on a top 50 list by Forbes earlier this year. You can follow Renee on Twitter @MagicSauceMedia or at her Down The Avenue blog. Achieving Social@Scale Means Getting Rid of Your Silos BY RENEE BLODGET Developing personal relationships with customers isn’t new and smart marketing-centric companies have been investing in customer relationships for years. Dell, McDonald’s and American Airlines did it in the early days. Zappos now makes personal customer relationships their raison d’etre and after a series of “fails,” Comcast is attempting to show the customer matters with “Comcast Cares.” It’s never been easier to reach out and develop relationships with customers in an always-on world where you can respond to their needs, demands and praise instantaneously. What makes it complex and expensive for corporations to take customer relationships to a deeper level is the fact that conversation threads are fragmented and exist in silos on multiple social media channels, making it not only difficult to monitor and manage, but tough to keep a consistent voice that matches the brand. There’s an added layer of complexity when the brand is perceived differently in different countries around the world and an added layer of fear ensuring they abide by proper governance protocols. “Developing personal relationships with customers isn’t new.” Getting rid of the silos so more efficient communication can happen on a regular basis is the key to success. Multi-division enterprises need to focus on one single platform where you can manage the brand’s voice across all of these channels and smartly curate customized content. This will ensure that not only their customer’s concerns are heard, but responded to in a way that will foster relationships contributing to their bottom line. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 22
  • Augie Ray was most recently the Executive Director of Community and Collaboration at USAA, where he and his team managed social media programs for marketing and customer care, deployed communities, educated employees and executives on social media trends and created the enterprise social business vision. Augie was previously at Forrester, where he consulted on social media marketing, community and social media management platforms as well as the organizational structure for social. You can follow Augie on Twitter @augieray or at his Experience: The Blog. Your Job is NOT to Raise Your Own Klout Score: Thinking Beyond Posts, Tweets, Games and Pins BY AUGIE RAY Lots of folks seem to feel that the words “control” and “social” don’t belong together in the same sentence. That’s ridiculous -- large companies cannot simply unleash thousands of employees to launch whatever accounts they wish and maintain them in any manner that feels right, all without rules, tools, guidance and monitoring. The stakes are far too high: Large brands can neither afford to be the next poster child for social PR blunders, nor can they allow a competitive advantage to slip away over fears of social missteps. “It can be a costly mistake to allow different parts of the company to secure their own listening platforms.” It is too easy for a social media professional to get caught up in all the ideas and possibilities of social, but the first step isn’t to think of tweets, posts, games and pins. Instead, Social@Scale begins with more mundane but vital things: Does your industry face any special regulations? Do your employees understand their limits and what actions can get them and the company in trouble? Do your managers understand what is and is not appropriate when disciplining an employee for something posted to a social network? Is your organization’s social media policy supported with education and communication to keep it top of mind? Do you have monitoring in place to recognize and act upon legal, compliance and reputation threats? Are policies in place that govern how your brand participates in social media? cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 23
  • Your Job is NOT to Raise Your Own Klout Score: cont’d. It’s also important to select tools that can be deployed and support the enterprise. It can be a costly mistake to allow different parts of the company to secure their own listening platforms, social media management tools, community platforms and other social tools. Coordination is necessary to prevent redundancy and conflicting data and systems. Social@Scale means having to find the right tools that can scale and adapt to different needs for different departments. Once the foundation is in place, the next step is to devise and execute strategies for (and in collaboration with) departments throughout the enterprise. The social team in a larger organization has to think of all the ways the organization will use social and help peers to understand the needs, processes and tools. This includes not just marketing and PR personnel, but also customer service, human resources, product management, business intelligence and others. Too often, social strategies start in the wrong place--with a focus on a Facebook fan page or Pinterest board. I often find myself returning to Forrester’s simple but powerful POST methodology: 1. Define the People -- the audience, their social behaviors, etc. 2. Set the Objectives: What do you wish to accomplish and how will you measure success? 3. Devise the Strategies: How will you achieve those goals? 4. Determine the Tools, Technology and Tactics. This is the stage when you determine if you have the skills and resources you need, the responsibilities for personnel, the tools to be used or acquired, etc. Being responsible for social media in a large firm is far more about helping others to succeed -- and preventing them from making costly mistakes -- than developing and executing your own ideas and strategies. At the end of the day, your job is to allow hundreds or thousands of people to create value using social platforms and strategies, not raise your own Klout score. Lots of people can do the Social part, but finding the right leader who can help a firm with the Scale is tougher. “Too often, social strategies start in the wrong place--with a focus on a Facebook fan page or Pinterest board.” SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 24
  • Nicknamed “The King of Social” by Samsung at South by SouthWest, Brett Petersel is constantly connecting people, testing and recommending technology, and always striving to improve the influence and impact of community. Brett is author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Twitter Marketing,” and “The Grande Guide to Community Management.” You can follow Brett on Twitter @Brett or at BrettPetersel.com. Time to Get Rid of Your Social Media Silos BY BRETT PETERSEL It only takes one fire to rage out of control to damage a brand’s reputation. That’s why managing Social@Scale should be a critical requirement for any global enterprise today. Whether it’s proactive engagement with consumers or reacting to concerns of dissatisfaction, large companies need to plan and react faster and smarter -- across departments, divisions, cultures and continents. With lessons learned about online reputation management, companies need to constantly listen and engage customers, where and when they are talking about them. But first they have to scale how they use Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and other social media channels in order to best monitor their brand reputation. And large global enterprises can’t do this in departmental or social media silos. Companies that manage all social media communication across the entire organization using an independent social media management solution to benchmark every action and reaction will succeed. They’ll be able to reduce support traffic and related costs and resources, while increasing personal engagement, improving customer support and developing more valuable relationships with customers. The next question I usually hear from companies is: “Who is going to handle these responsibilities?” Many departments within an organization can dedicate themselves to listening, engaging, marketing, sharing, responding to and supporting their audiences -- but they’d be missing the point. Again, this is a silo-approach versus an action taken across the global organization. Large enterprises have already appointed decision-makers and teams across the organization for approving important communications. By adding Community Managers, these decision-making teams can have a go-to for analyzing how their actions had a direct impact on the company as well as direct online access to their SMMS. As more people embrace social media as their weapon of choice for all things help-related, companies will find themselves yearning for a single platform that will alert and connect them with audiences they care about. “It only takes one fire to rage out of control to damage a brand’s reputation; large companies need to plan and react faster and smarter.” One platform to rule them all sounds great to me, especially when large companies like Dell, Samsung, Dupont and Cisco already invested in a global solution to manage all their social media efforts. Now, learning about, communicating with and engaging with customers old and new has never been easier. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 25
  • Ted Rubin is the most followed CMO on Twitter. In March 2009, he started using and evangelizing the term ROR, Return on Relationship, a concept he believes is the cornerstone for building an engaged multi-million member database, many of whom are vocal advocates for the brand. He proved the ROR premise with the communities he built as an executive for e.l.f. Cosmetics and OpenSky. His book, Return on Relationship, is due to be released in September. You can follow Ted on Twitter @tedrubin or at his Straight Talk blog. Return on Relationship: Why Companies Need to Embrace Social@Scale BY TED RUBIN Since my social mantra has always been about “Return on Relationship,” it’s refreshing to see a shift in the corporate mindset regarding the business use of social media. According to a 2012 Social Business Benchmarking Study by FedEx and Ketchum, large companies still view social as a tool for building brand loyalty and strengthening customer relationships (and in my opinion they have a long way to go). However, companies are also beginning to see the benefits of scaling social to other relationship-driven aspects of the business, from enhancing collaboration and dialogue with stakeholders, to strengthening relationships with employees and vendors. And it’s about time! Since everything we do in business relies on developing and strengthening good relationships, why lock the most effective relationship-building tool we have in a marketing closet? Take away the “social media is for marketing” blinders, and all kinds of possibilities within your organization become clear. Shift your approach from Social Marketing to Social Business. The value of Social goes well beyond marketing. Take a step back and envision ways you could use social tools WITHIN your business, especially if your organization has multiple centers of operation. Wouldn’t it be nice to have faster, better communication between departments? Share workflow around projects across time zones? Enhance conversation with external stakeholders around the world and quickly open dialog with new vendors? Of course it would! The power of social communication can get you there because t enhances the ability to make personal connections happen -and personal connections are what drive business forward. “Shift your approach from Social Marketing to Social Business. The value of Social goes well beyond marketing.” cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 26
  • Return on Relationship: cont’d. We’ve seen a little of this in the way some companies have tapped employees to enhance customer service across social channels, expanding those departments from centralized operations to team-based collaborative efforts that eliminate walls. The result is an exponentially increased level of service through expanded human-to-human attention -- something that no automated system can replicate. It’s like a return to the earlier times of doing business before commoditization took out the human factor and depersonalized business transactions. We knew our neighbors, we knew our local butcher, the grocer, the milkman -- all on a personal, face-to-face basis. Now we’re able to return to that level of personal touch because social media has essentially given the consumer a voice again, and our innate desire to personally interact with other people is driving it. I think the FedEx/ Ketchum study is a reflection of that recognition and a welcome one. According to the study, 85 percent of companies surveyed said that employee participation in company social efforts has increased over the last 12 months. And companies are beginning to engage their employees internally through social -- almost 50 percent of those surveyed. That’s a good start, but it needs to go even further. “85 percent of companies surveyed said that employee participation in company social efforts has increased over the last 12 months.” Forward-thinking companies should be scaling social to allow diverse team members to collaborate on complex projects in real time (from anywhere), as well as eliminate bottlenecks that encumber internal processes. More businesses need to tap into the power of social search to gauge sentiment, get a feel for what’s happening on a global scale, investigate and interact with vendors, and use that information to innovate faster in a shifting marketplace. Does it take retooling your organizational systems? -- Yes. Is it painful? Perhaps, but we only resist change because we’re unable (or unwilling) to visualize the outcome, and those who don’t adapt to a changing environment quickly die. The ground may be shifting beneath our corporate feet, but we can’t go back to business as usual and survive. We’ve seen social power at work in developing better customer relationships for companies of every shape and size. It’s no longer an unknown -- it’s a proven tool. So now is the time, my friends, to take social out of the marketing box and scale it across ALL business in order to truly maximize return on relationships. Embrace it -- own it -- make it part of your business culture, and Social@Scale will help you thrive. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 27
  • SECTION 3 Social@Scale Organizational Models
  • Sarah Evans is the Chief Evangelist at Tracky, an open social collaboration platform. She shares her social media and tech favorites at Sarah’s Faves as well as a daily resource for PR professionals called Commentz. Sarah previously worked with a local crisis center to raise more than $161,000 via social media and is a team member of the Guinness Book World Record holding #beatcancer. You can follow Sarah on Twitter @prsarahevans or at SevansStrategy.com. How to Scale the Social Media Corporate Team at the Enterprise Level BY SARAH EVANS CEOs must recognize that the “communication cycle” – the way information originates, spreads and influences – has forever changed. We no longer “own” our corporate messages – assuming we ever did, of course. But this ownership shift has created a new, even more vital need for scaling a social media team at the enterprise level. Think about how social media integrates with your culture (internal and external), but don’t overthink it. For now, focus on the short term fix and long term strategy. In larger organizations, new initiatives can die a slow death by committee. You don’t have time to overthink social and let it become the elephant in the room. For most enterprise-level clients, I recommend implementing a hub-and-spoke model. The corporate social media team serves as the “hub” with other departments within the organization serving as the “spokes.” The social media team is empowered by the CEO and, like your PR team, has direct access to key internal positions. “We no longer ‘own’ our corporate messages.” For example, while you may or may not have a customer service representative as part of your corporate social media team, you may have a liaison from that department. This person knows their fit within the social media structure and may be routed customer service inquiries on a regular basis. Depending on the organization, these departmental liaisons may have different levels of accountability and responsibility to monitor, respond and follow up with social tasks. It doesn’t matter what your team “in charge” of social media is called, as long as you have the right team. The typical makeup of a corporate social media team looks like this: 1. EVP or VP Social Strategy -- This person may oversee all communications efforts with an additional social branch added on. (Some organizations add this to the EVP of Communications or Marketing role). 2. Social and Emerging Media Manager -- This position is responsible for day-to-day social activities and implementation of the overall strategy. This person would also serve as point-of-contact with any creative agencies. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 29
  • How to Scale the Social Media Corporate Team at the Enterprise Level cont’d. 3. Community Manager -- The online voice and perhaps, the face of your organization. In order to make this a sustainable role, you may want to have multiple people in this role or rotate responsibilities. 4. Social Analyst -- This role is needed to monitor online trends, track analytics, create internal reports and the like. 5. Web Developer and Designer -- This role may be filled by an existing role within an IT team. If you have a large IT team, someone should be appointed to be part of the social team. 6. Content Manager -- Depending on the size of your organization, this may be multiple roles. You need people to produce high-level multimedia content on a regular basis. It’s a full-time job. “Arm your corporate social media team with the right tools and equipment needed to do their jobs.” 7. Internal Evangelists -- Employees who love to talk about your organization online (and probably already do). Bring them on as ad hoc members of the team, train them accordingly and empower them to compliment the team. 8. Public Relations and/or Communications Liaison -- This is a member of the PR/marketing department who collaborates with the team to ensure messaging is the same across the organization. A bonus... The platforms you use can make or break you. It’s great if you have your corporate model and team in place, but it will be worthless without a clear workflow and the right tools in place. You must arm your corporate social media team with the right tools and equipment needed to do their jobs. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 30
  • Jeff Bullas is a digital marketing strategist and one of Forbes’ “Top 50 Social Media Power Influencers.” He is also the author of “Blogging the Smart Way - How to Create and Market your Blog with Social Media.” The JeffBullas.com blog receives over 300,000 hits a month and has 170,000 unique readers. You can follow Jeff on Twitter @JeffBullas or at his personal blog. Why Social@Scale Shouldn’t Be Left to the Interns BY JEFF BULLAS There are many myths about social media marketing but the biggest one by far is that it is easy and can be done by an intern at lunch time. For medium to large enterprises, is it is far from simple because social media marketing does not scale very easily and it requires many resources, skills and processes that until recently were at an adolescent stage of development. With social media marketing you need to: Write, film and capture the content. Edit the content into a creative format that entertains, educates and inspires. Create it for the different types of media such as video, text (for blog posts), Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other major social media networks. Establish processes that control the publishing and monitoring of the content that is spread globally by many individuals within one organization that keeps the brand police happy. Publish it on multiple networks. Optimize it for a variety of multimedia formats. Develop and optimize it for many types of screens including laptops, iPads, iPhones, Android smartphones and tablets so that it renders properly and is easily consumed. “social media marketing does not scale very easily and it requires many resources, skills and processes that until recently were at an adolescent stage of development.” Optimize the content and platforms for search engines. Monitor and measure the data you receive to see what works and what doesn’t. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 31
  • Why Social@Scale Shouldn’t Be Left to the Interns cont’d. It is becoming a deluge of data on many social networks. So far, organizations in the main are using disparate and multiple tools such as Hootsuite, Tweetdeck and Klout that add a layer of complexity and are silos of data and processes that do not lend themselves to the era of big social data. Help is at hand. Tools and processes are emerging to make it possible to do Social@Scale. Some enterprise class platforms will be able to deliver on the promise of one stop social solutions platforms that will enable organizations to do “Social@Scale.” I look forward to this emerging evolution of social media marketing as it moves from adolescent promise to mature and robust business class platforms and processes.. We are seeing the rise of the “Ninja Nerd” who understands technology and the creative process on an increasingly social web. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 32
  • Chris Brogan is president of Human Business Works, a publishing and media company devoted to promoting the Human Business Way. He frequently consults with Fortune 500 companies on the future of business communication including the impact of social networks and mobile technology. Chris is also the co-author of “Trust Agents” and author of “Google+ for Business: How Google’s Social Network Changes Everything.” You can follow him on Twitter @chrisbrogan or at ChrisBrogan.com. Six Areas Where to Focus Your Social@Scale Energy BY CHRIS BROGAN For those complaining that social media doesn’t scale, the trick is this: We equate these tools to personal relationships. Because of that, we can’t just open a “call center” for many of the touchpoints. However, as we move forward, and these tools become the new phone, the new radio, the new TV, it’s no longer going to be a world of solo trust agents, but trust agencies. Will you be ready? When I talk about scaling your efforts, here are the areas I’m talking about: 1. Listening/Monitoring – In my estimation, every social media effort has to have this at the core. You can split up the listening/monitoring chores so that each member of your team owns some level of the process. For instance, your PR person can use the tools to listen for crisis issues, for storytelling opportunities, etc. Your customer service people can use the tools to enhance their communication. Your marketers can listen for opportunities. Although you’re splitting the vast bucket of information that comes in during listening, someone should still own it. Maybe that’s the product lead, the manager of that line of business, whoever is responsible for the bottom line. They should have their eyes on listening the entire time. “Add to client relations when you can, from internal resources. It pays off.” 2. Customer Service – Some companies already have this nailed down. Dell, Comcast and Zappos have built great customer service integrations using social channels. This area seems the most important to scale. Customer service is a tireless experience and requires prompt attention. You need a deep bench. I think Frank at Comcast has 14 people on his team at this point, to give you a sense of it. Of all the social media tasks, this is tied for the most time consuming and most important (client relations is the other). Learning how to scale this might be nuanced and customized, but just knowing this is the hardest part might be enough to get you a little further. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 33
  • Six Areas Where to Focus Your Social@Scale Energy cont’d. 3. Client Relations – I separate client relations from customer service because I think this part includes managing things like Facebook groups, managing blog comments, etc. It’s the “There’s no problem, but I’d like to keep you warm” part of business. You sometimes see “community manager” in this role (though I see the best community managers combining a few of the above topics). This is also the hardest of the brand promises, because if you’re nice to me on Twitter, but your counter help stinks, did you really move the needle? I vote no. And if you start offering this to your customer base, you’ve got to maintain it. Reduce the hours spent here at your own risk. 4. Social Marketing – This area involves things like finding new customers via Twitter, coming up with YouTube challenges, etc. Social marketing is probably the easiest area to scale, but it’s also the one where you can see the most obvious results of marketing campaigns. For instance, if you build a loyalty program and you need sign-ups, you can count pretty easily how many people took advantage of your offer -- and you know whether or not to devote more attention to it. 5. Sales Prospecting – Your sales team should already be realizing the sales benefits of the social web. Every day, someone’s out there talking about their needs, and giving you a sense of how you could sell to them. These opportunities require a bit of time, but no more so than old fashioned prospecting. Switch out some of your time from sifting through phone books or wherever you find your customers, and dedicate it to searching for new clients on the web tools on the web. For ongoing relationships, if you’re not keeping tabs on their social presence, you’re missing the opportunity to know how they’re doing before you make your important sales calls. This doesn’t take a ton of time, but requires you to build it into your process. 6. Publishing – Blogging, shooting videos, content development – that’s where much of your time gets eaten up, and yet, that’s also where a lot of the value comes from. My blog posts may seem like they are given away for free, but some will generate a query for business. Publishing should never be considered the thing to slip. Hell, it’s the product sometimes, and other times, it’s the best advertising you could ever create. Never skimp on publishing. Where Does That Leave You? I’ve told you that everything’s important and that nothing can be cut back. So where do you scale? Spread listening/monitoring as deep as you can. Enhance customer service and deepen that bench internally. Add to client relations when you can, from internal resources. It pays off. Social marketing can be augmented by external help. Sales prospecting is a sales job, but can be augmented. Publishing is important, but can be augmented by external help. That’s how I see it. Again, if you’re talking about smaller scale operations, you’ll have to find the mix. I’ve put it almost in order of importance, from top to bottom. You can shuffle it a bit. Is that how you see it? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 34
  • Jason Falls is an author, speaker and CEO of Social Media Explorer, a digital marketing agency and information products company. An award-winning social media strategist and widely read industry pundit, Jason has been noted as a top influencer in the social technology and marketing space by Forbes, Entrepreneur, Advertising Age and others. He is the co-author of two books: “No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide To Social Media Marketing” (2011), and “The Rebel’s Guide To Email Marketing,” due in September 2012. You can follow Jason on Twitter @JasonFalls or at SocialMediaExplorer.com. Social Media Software is Only Part of the Equation BY JASON FALLS As much as I’m sure many involved with this project would love it if I said what the enterprise needs to be Social@Scale was a nifty software platform, it’s far more complex a problem to solve than code can provide. Social@Scale is only feasible with three core tenets: 1. Personnel 2. Environment 3. Consistency You have to have the right people to make Social@Scale happen. And it’s not always just throwing more people at the problem, it’s making sure the right people are in place. Assigning franchise store managers the task of performing the local end of social media is often a mistake. The manager may not have the interest or inclination to tackle social on top of his or her other responsibilities. “I like to think of a ‘dialed-in’ social team like an old school newsroom on deadline.” Having team members that are in tune with a collaborative and nimble environment is helpful. I like to think of a “dialed-in” social team like an old school newsroom on deadline. As issues arise online, segments of the team swarm into action, responding, routing, discussing opportunities. Yes, this might happen with one social media manager at the corporate level and two assigned local or departmental contacts within the company, but it could also be a war room full of “engagement” experts in a large enterprise with a high volume of always-on conversations. Your environment includes everything from the software you use to the workflow built in with compliance and legal to ensure your responses can be as fast and efficient as possible. Southwest Airlines realized responding an hour after a customer complained about something online was far too long. So at least one member of senior management and one person from the company’s legal team is now on-call, 24-7, to respond to social media issues. And last I checked, they were required to respond to any situation that arises in minutes, not hours. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 35
  • Social Media Software is Only Part of the Equation cont’d. Software comes into play here, too. You can’t scale anything without the tools that empower the personnel to read, react, respond and resolve. You need to be able to publish, engage, monitor, measure, capture leads and more, and none of that happens easily without software. But you also need policies and if-then workflows that create an empowered environment for your team to execute upon. Finally, to build Social@Scale, you have to take your team and your environment and be consistent with your efforts. Customers don’t take time off from online conversations. Customer service is now a 24-7 problem online. At a minimum, enterprise companies need to have a team and structure in place to ensure current customers are cared for and responded to in our always-on world. Reaching beyond the read-and-react execution of social, companies need to build content that attracts and engages its stakeholders, but you can’t do that this week and not next. Once the expectation is set, it’s there to stay. This isn’t meant to scare companies off that are considering social. If you’re not “in” yet, you’d better get there soon. Today’s consumer is online more and more and most often on and in social media sites. It’s not a question of “if,” but “when” you’ll need to be dialed in to social and thinking about scale. The consistency tenet is there to establish the expectation, for you and for your customers. This is the world we live in now. “You can’t scale anything without the tools that empower the personnel to read, react, respond and resolve.” You have a seat at the table. So pull up a chair and introduce yourself. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 36
  • Jay Baer is co-author of “The NOW Revolution” and a “hype-free” social media consultant for 29 of the Fortune 500. You can follow Jay on Twitter @jaybaer or at his Convince & Convert blog. The 5 Critical Social Media Skills You Need to Disperse BY JAY BAER Everybody in your company is in marketing, whether they want to be or not. Let the ubiquity and speed of real-time communication empower your staff to act and be helpful, no matter where they are on the organizational chart. Increasingly, social media needs to become a skill, not a job. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 37
  • The 5 Critical Social Media Skills You Need to Disperse cont’d. Here are five skills that should be present within as many people in your company as possible: 1. Brand Immersion and Representation Once upon a time, the only people who really needed to “get” your brand were the ones who built its external facade: marketing, public relations, and corporate communications. Now you need to give everyone some guidelines, but also the freedom to articulate and represent your company in their own authentic way. 2. Success Metrics Although only a small group of employees will likely be responsible for specifically measuring the impact of your social media initiatives, the best programs are those that share those metrics with all employees. 3. Listening Having a finger on the pulse of how social media and the activity within it affects your company, your department, and your industry is a universal responsibility. Soon, it won’t be enough to have just a centralized “listener” and you’ll need each division and department (and the people within them) to be listening for their own unique purposes. “Everybody in your company is in marketing, whether they want to be or not.” 4. Internal Wiring and Story Harvesting Your company must be able to communicate stories seamlessly whenever opportunities arise. Build great internal communication, and give people the tools to share ideas, experiences, and expertise. 5. Engagement Your social media representatives will do most of the online communication with your customers and prospects — but not all. Build education and training programs for those who want to get involved, and help them be part of the effort. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 38
  • Matt Dickman is EVP, Social Business Innovation at Weber Shandwick in Chicago. He is charged with helping the firm’s largest clients leverage the power of social media, affect the internal change needed to do so and guide them through a constantly changing ecosystem. You can follow Matt on Twitter @MattDickman or at his Techno+Culture blog. Social@Scale Begins With an Informed C-Suite BY MATT DICKMAN Over the course of the past 8 years of my 15+ in the digital space, I have been in the trenches with some of the largest companies in the world, helping them to reach Social@Scale. Social media can be an ambiguous idea to many business executives. However, once broken down into a clear strategic framework, it not only makes sense -- it makes business sense. The rapidly growing volume of content out there, and the number of customers -- especially in emerging markets -- necessitate a clear, consistent approach to engage at scale. To scale appropriately, companies need to have a strong, lowrisk social business foundation in place. In working with the Fortune 100, I have come to find a number of truths that I use to guide clients through this challenging environment every day. Those include C-level education and alignment, governance and controls, process, operational mapping and measurement. When people ask me what I do, I tell them “everything before you Tweet.” This is what I refer to as social architecture design and it allows companies to fully maximize their efforts in the space. It all starts with an informed C-Suite. I can tell within two questions on new engagements if the C-Suite is fully behind the company’s social media efforts. If they are, great. If not (which is far more likely), this is a critical step for success. “People often ask, ‘Who should own social media?’ and my response is ‘the business.’” People often ask, “Who should own social media?” and my response is “the business.” Without C-level alignment, the business is not empowered and cannot align appropriately. This leads to infighting and a breakdown in communication and worst of all, a gap in the customer experience. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 39
  • Social@Scale Begins With an Informed C-Suite cont’d. Once the C-Suite is on board and has clarified that social media is a business priority, formal governance and controls have to be put into place. These allow “swim lanes” to be created internally so teams know their specific role within the social media landscape and know how they interoperate. Formal, written processes also help teams stay in their swim lanes and ensure that the right content is leveraged and tracked (for regulated industries) over time. These processes then get mapped out internally and integrated into existing business processes. Integrating social data into the customer service process, for example, is a great way to gain more insight on existing and new customers. Finally, having a common, unified measurement framework allows companies to evaluate the success of programs over time. There are other risks and mitigation techniques, but the ones I mentioned above are the most glaring. Companies should think about social media as powerful business input, one that requires cross-functional alignment, rigor and dedicated resourcing. When done appropriately, companies can start realizing value very quickly. When done wrong, the impact can be just as damaging to the bottom line and to the company’s reputation. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 40
  • SECTION 4 Content & Conversation to be Social@Scale
  • Venkatesh Rao, who prefers to be called “Venkat,” is a technology analyst and marketing consultant who regularly contributes to Information Week and Forbes. He is also the author of “Tempo: Timing, Tactics and Strategy in Narrative-Driven Decision-Making.” You can follow Venkat on Twitter @vgr or at his Ribbonfarm blog. Avoid Fake Relationships: Using Irony and Humor to Engage Contradictory Marketing Realities BY VENKATESH RAO To do “Social@Scale,” we must acknowledge the contradiction underlying the very phrase. Almost by definition, social is the opposite of scale. Many concepts du jour share this contradictory characteristic, including “mass customization,” “mass personalization,” and “globally local.” But Social@Scale is perhaps the toughest member of the family since it involves human relationships to other humans, rather than human relationships to products, markets or geographies. The challenge of social at scale is to reconcile known limits to social dynamics, such as the well-known Dunbar Number (the limit, estimated to be about 150, at which human brains cannot process new relationships individually) and the imperatives of scaling business activities. How does a company of say, 2000 employees, serving a market of perhaps 20,000 individuals, shape its social character without resorting to industrial age models such as hierarchical organizations, lame clones of Tupperware party concepts and so forth? “How does a company of 2000 employees, serving a market of perhaps 20,000 individuals, shape its social character?” This problem itself is not new. Viewed from a marketing perspective, the industrial age solution would be to collect massive amounts of data on the inbound side and crunch the data so effectively that an employee at a touchpoint moment can behave as though she were a long-time friend of the customer in a continuous relationship. We can even sustain fictional characters for customer support roles and make the process transparent to the customer. On the outbound side, we already see extensions to industrial age models, such as recurring cross-media campaign characters (such as Progressive’s Flo, Dos Equis’ “Most Interesting Man in the World”) to add a touch of manufactured humanity to brands and messages. These could easily evolve into messaging vehicles indistinguishable from reality. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 42
  • Avoid Fake Relationships: cont’d. But ultimately, these are simulated relationships on both the inbound and outbound sides. To really go beyond industrial age models, we need to forget about the technology and challenge customers to engage us in relationships that are, quite simply, more sophisticated. I’m talking about relationships that effectively use irony and humor to at once acknowledge the artificial and simulated nature of the manufactured “personal” relationship and make use of its undoubted practical utility. Irony and humor have always been humanity’s primary tools in creatively engaging contradictory realities. The alternative is a dystopian nightmare of unacknowledged, or worse, unrecognized theatricality that will ultimately only make the relationship, and the entities on both sides of it, stupider and poorer in every way. Just as “wrestling” is fun when everybody conspiratorially shares in the fiction that it is real, but tragic, dehumanizing and infantilizing when grown-ups don’t realize it is a show, Social@ Scale will need to rely, ultimately, on crafting creatively ironic relationships with customers. Companies that fail to do this will become exploitative. The power of the new technologies is such that it is possible to create Social@Scale that is indistinguishable from the real thing, but nevertheless does the same sort of deep damage that anything fake always does. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 43
  • Edward Boches is chief innovation officer and partner at Mullen, an Ad Age A-List agency, and one of Fast Company’s 10 Most Innovative Companies in Advertising & Marketing. During his 30 year tenure, he has helped define the agency’s creative standards, established its public relations group, integrated digital design and production into all of the agency’s operations, and launched its growing social influence practice. You can follow Edward on Twitter @edwardboches or at his Creativity Unbound blog. 7 Tips For Being Social And Doing It at Scale BY EDWARD BOCHES So, you want to do social at scale? Get closer to your customers? Derive actual value and ROI from the new age of connectivity? Here’s what you have to do: 1. Change Your Culture Social can’t be a medium. It has to be a behavior, a belief and a philosophy. Acknowledge that customers are in control. Being open, accessible and transparent is a start. But a social culture takes more than that. It needs support and participation from senior management and a demonstration of commitment in everything from product development to customer service. 2. Develop a User-Based Content Strategy Once upon a time, we could get away with messages that were all about us, intended only to persuade. Today content has to add real value. Give viewers, readers and listeners a role. Assure that your content -- be it entertainment or utility – takes into consideration how and when an individual engages. If you think of social as an isolated program, you will miss opportunities. If you use social media as nothing more than distribution channels for your brand stories, you will fail. “Social can’t be a medium. It has to be a behavior, a belief and a philosophy.” 3. Start Everything With Mobile First The future of social is mobile. What’s on everyone’s smart phone? Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Foursquare and Path. As a new cashless society emerges, their money will be on their phone soon, too. Users share where they are, what they’re doing, and the things they’re buying via mobile. Start all of your marketing and customer facing programs with the technology that matters most. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 44
  • 7 Tips For Being Social And Doing It at Scale cont’d. 4. Think Interest Graph Sooner Rather Than Later The social graph is great. Facebook and Twitter leveraged the network effect to gather millions of users who connect us to their friends. But there are new platforms emerging -- Pinterest and Springpad to name a couple -- where users reveal their interests. Be it food, music, tech, travel or fashion, consumers raise their hands and declare, “this is what I am into.” Start now to use and develop corporate-wide ways to tap into the interest graph. 5. Make Real-Time One-to-One Marketing Your Objective Marketers that pursue personal, one-on-one conversations with individuals and the communities in which they are active will win. But if you’re only posting on Facebook between 9 and 5 when most users don’t show up until after 7, you still have a long way to go. You don’t have to DM with your customers one at a time. But you do need apps, technology and services that deliver answers, content and utility relevant to the moment. 6. Consider Having an API You might think that APIs are for startups and social media applications. But APIs can be great for large companies, too. You have reams of useful data and information. It’s possible that by freeing that data you’ll inspire external developers to invent new uses for it and attract new customers. APIs may not be a social medium, but they are a social behavior. 7. Learn to Predict, Not Just to Measure Finally, what do you do with all the interactions you inspire and measure via social media? Marketing is no longer about persuading consumers what to do or buy but rather predicting what they want next. For that, you’ll need all of your customer analytics integrated with your social programs. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 45
  • Ann Handley is the Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs and the co-author of the best-selling “Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business.” You can follow Ann on Twitter @MarketingProfs or at her personal blog. An Open Letter to C-Level Executives: How do we SCALE social? BY ANN HANDLEY Dear Forward-Thinking C-Level Executive: First, let me say one thing: I’m thrilled that social media is on your radar as something you realize requires scaling. I’m ecstatic that you aren’t looking at social media as something that’s relegated to the intern who is handling the company Twitter account, or even as something that’s confined to marketing. That’s not a gratuitous compliment, either. Because I talk to a lot of company execs who aren’t anywhere close to asking the question you are here. I talk to a lot of companies that think because they have a blog they’re “doing social.” So for thinking beyond tactics and technologies? Bravo! “Your social efforts are only as good as your story.” But getting back to the original issue, here’s my take: Your social efforts are only as good as your story. What do I mean by that? At the root of any good social media strategy is really your content. And the cornerstone of your content is your story. When I’m talking “story” here, I’m not talking about bedtime books or fairy tales: I’m talking about who you are as a company, what makes you valuable, and how your products and services live and work in the real world. I’m talking about how you help people: How you shoulder their burdens, ease their pain, help them work more efficiently, save them time or money -- or how you whiten their teeth, improve their relationships, and make them look smarter to their bosses. In other words: Your story is not what you do, it’s what you do -- for others. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 46
  • An Open Letter to C-Level Executives: How do we SCALE social? cont’d. That’s Marketing 101, I know. But when it comes to content — and social media — it seems a lot of companies forget that. Instead, they start talking about themselves… and that look-at-us-aren’t-we-awesome approach will shed followers faster than a Golden Retriever sheds a winter coat in the spring. At the enterprise level, there’s a lot that goes into expressing that story: You have to make it, manage it, monitor it, measure it. Producing a webinar might be easy enough, but how do you produce webinars in a way that’s repeatable and sustainable, maybe once a month, every month, year after year? Here’s my take: Think Content, Not Campaign -- Content isn’t a one-and-done campaign, it’s a strategic approach that requires a consistent and ongoing effort. That means you need to develop some new and necessary talent and processes. You need to hire content experts, find brand journalists to create content on behalf of your brand, and deputize a Chief Content Officer or a VP of Content Marketing, or whatever works for your organization. You need to have someone in charge of delivering a consistent flow of socially optimized content, and be sure they have the tools and budget the job requires — things like editorial calendars, and access to creative talent like freelance writers, photographers, and designers. At the root of all good social strategy is this: Content marketing is an amazing opportunity for you to engage with your prospects and customers in new and interesting ways. Think Craft -- Have you read corporate blogs that are full of hopeless drivel and boring Frankenspeak? I have, too. Your content will stand apart if you manage to create stuff that is truly special — that borders on art. Does that sound high-mined? I don’t think so. The reality is that your content is something worth paying attention to, investing in, and truly caring about. Reimagine, Don’t Just Recycle -- That means making sure you squeeze every last bit of content goodness out of every content asset you create or own. It means ending up with parts that are greater than the original whole. I like how Netprospex approaches its monthly content calendar: A white paper on segmentation is reworked and reimagined as a workbook on segmentation. That workbook is further distilled into a checklist. The checklist becomes a series of individual tweets. The tweets are compiled into a “Ten Tips” blog post. And finally, the material is reworked as a bylined article for an industry publication. The results? From one white paper, Netprospex has five times more content to share with its audience across multiple social outposts and channels. “Content is a strategic approach that requires a consistent and ongoing effort.” I know you asked me about social media, and here I am talking about content. But it’s critical that you think of both. At least, from where I sit. I SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 47
  • Doc Searls is author of The Intention Economy: When Customers Take Charge, published by Harvard Business Review Press . He is also a senior editor for Linux Journal, the original (and still the leading) Linux publication, and is one of four co-authors of the best-selling The Cluetrain Manifesto. Because Doc is always working on too many things, and will only stop when he’s dead, he wants his epitaph to read: “He was almost finished.” You can follow Doc on Twitter @dsearls or at his personal blog. The Personal Side of Social@Scale BY DOC SEARLS The scale we need today is personal, not social. Here is what personal scale looks like in the marketplace: 1. Customers will have their own ways to tell the market what they want, how they want it, where and when they want it, and even how much they’d like to pay. 2. Customer power will be personal, not just collective. That means each customer will come to market equipped with his or her own means for collecting and storing personal data, and for sharing it selectively, in an accountable (even auditable) way, with trusted others. 3. Voluntarily shared information from customers can include data from relationships with many other sellers. The range and quality of this data will outperform sellers’ systems for limiting customer input. It will also repurpose the guesswork mills of marketing, fed by crumb-trails of data shed by customers’ mobile gear, apps and Web browsers. “Customer loyalty will be a product of mutual respect and concern, rather than of coercion by sellers.” 4. Customers will be able to form genuine relationships with sellers, on terms both sides provide, and not just on sellers’ terms. 5. Customer loyalty will be a product of mutual respect and concern, rather than of coercion by sellers. This means customers will, in effect, have their own loyalty programs, which will inform and improve those of the sellers. 6. Customers will express their native power either directly, or through fourth parties, which are agents clearly working for customers, rather than for sellers (which is the case for most third parties today). cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 48
  • The Personal Side of Social@Scale cont’d. 7. There will be opportunity costs for businesses that ignore signaling coming from customers, and opportunity gains for businesses that take advantage of customers’ independence and vastly increased personal power. Leading customers in that direction are a growing collection of tools and services called VRM, for Vendor Relationship Management. These will engage and improve companies’ CRM, or customer relationship management systems. To meet this future, enterprises need to do two things. One is resist sales pressure from companies selling “big data” solutions intended to understand customers in the absence of direct, conscious and intentional input from those customers themselves. The other is to work with VRM developers to help scale up tools and services that increase customer independence and power to engage. You’ll have nothing to lose, and the best possible help you can get -- directly from the people most important to your business. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 49
  • Richard Stacy spent 20 years working in corporate communications and public relations agencies within the Saatchi & Saatchi / Publicis Groupe. His clients have included Diageo, P&G, IBM, the European Space Agency and the European Commission. For the last six years, he has specialized in social media, helping organizations manage the transition from the world of conventional mass communication into the world where influence lies in the connections forged in conversations with and between individual customers or consumers. You can follow Richard on Twitter @RichardStacy or at his personal blog and The Huffington Post. The Value of Small Group Conversations: Why a ‘Platform for the Masses’ is Not the Same Thing as a ‘Mass Platform’ BY RICHARD STACY Understanding scale is very important. Traditional media channels had scale built into them – get your message into the channel and there was a guarantee of reaching a certain number of people. Social media doesn’t have that guarantee, largely because social media is not a form of media or even a channel. It is better understood as a set of tools or infrastructures. While an infrastructure (such as a mobile network) may have many users, simply using it doesn’t guarantee you will reach all (or any) of the users. Because social media doesn’t bring scale with it, the scale effect is something you have to build into your usage. This requirement is further complicated by the fact that social ‘media’ is usually very ineffective at reaching lots of people – the exception being the very rare instance where something goes viral. Facebook became successful because it was a tool designed to allow small groups of people, most of whom already knew each other, to talk amongst themselves. Its success in doing this meant that it became a platform for the masses, but this is not the same thing as being a mass platform. “The scale effect in social media comes from understanding how to talk to small numbers of people at any given time.” The scale effect in social media comes from understanding how to talk to small numbers of people at any given time. The benefits are generated by the ability to talk to exactly the right people, about exactly the right thing, at exactly the right time. In this instance, “right” is usually defined by what the customer/consumer wants to know at the point in time when they need to know it – a behaviour-based attribute, not a channel-based attribute. Essentially, this is an extension of the customer service function. Customer service, which was previously locked up in email and phone channels, has become liberated and transformed from something you had to do as a business hygiene factor, to something which can become a frontline marketing or reputation tool. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 50
  • The Value of Small Group Conversations: cont’d. The other scale benefit is derived from that (still very small) group of people who are your brand loyalists. Prelini Udayan-Chiechi, of Lithium Technologies, has highlighted the concept of the super-fan. A prime example is Logitech fan “KachiWachi,” whose contributions to the company’s customer service community has been valued at $250,000. Critically, you don’t get the scale effect by trying to turn all of your consumers into super-fans – that will never happen – or by imagining that super-fans will become a form of digital influencer who will amplify or spread a brand message. (As previously posted, I don’t think digital influencers actually exist). You get the scale effect by how you allow the super-fans to help you run your business. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 51
  • Amy Vernon spent 20 years as a professional newspaper journalist before starting her new life as a digital strategist. Now the general manager of social marketing for New York startup Internet Media Labs, she’s also the mother of two young boys, an inaugural inductee of the New Jersey Social Media Hall of Fame and top female submitter of all time on Digg.com. Amy speaks at conferences around the country, including SXSWi, ROFL Con, Affiliate Summit, and SMX and has blogged for a variety of publications, including VentureBeat, Esquire.com, Network World and The Next Web. You can follow Amy on Twitter @amyvernon or at her Bacon Queen blog. You Have to Care BY AMY VERNON I could use a whole bunch of buzzwords to explain what Social@ Scale is and how to do it. But the fact is, it’s rather simple: To properly scale social media, you have to care. You have to care about what your audience wants. You have to care about how they’ll communicate with you. You have to care about how your employees feel about you. You won’t always gain the love and approval of your audience, but if you respond when they have problems, you’ll earn their respect. Your employees won’t feel as if every day is Happy Happy Fun Day, but if you give them the respect they deserve, they’ll want to share good news about you with their family and friends. You have to care enough to find out where your customers are and go there. You have to care enough to be a good resident of those social neighborhoods. You’ll find that your audience is reformatting and resharing your content and news in ways you never thought possible. Embrace it - make them a part of the process instead of the outsider. Find those people who love you and give them the tools to help your employees do their job. Your audience can do much of the heavy lifting for you in social. But only if you treat them with the respect they deserve. “You won’t always gain the love and approval of your audience, but if you respond when they have problems, you’ll earn their respect.” You have to care enough to do things right. Doing things right means giving your staff the tools to track the efforts of both your audience and employees and not freaking out everytime someone says something negative. It means cultivating a community that cares for you so much that they help you spread your message. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 52
  • SECTION 4 Branding in a Social@Scale World
  • Peter Shankman is the Vice President and Small Business Evangelist at Vocus, and marketing consultant to global brands including NASA, American Express, Disney and Saudi Aramco. He is the author of two books, Can We Do That?! Outrageous PR Stunts That Work and Why Your Company Needs Them,” and Customer Service: New Rules for a Social-Enabled World. Away from his electronic devices, Peter has completed 13 marathons, seven Olympic distance triathlons, two half-Ironman triathlons, and one full Ironman Triathlon. He’s also a B” licensed skydiver with over 260 jumps. You can follow Peter on Twitter @petershankman or at his personal blog. The Great Airport Steak-Out: How Morton’s Gets Its Customers to Scale Social for Them. BY PETER SHANKMAN Last summer, after a particularly long day that saw me up at 3 a.m. for a 6 a.m. flight from NYC to Florida, a lunch meeting, then a flight home, I jokingly tweeted to Morton’s Steakhouse, asking if they’d be so kind as to meet me at Newark Airport with a Porterhouse Steak when I landed in a few hours. Much to my shock and amazement, they did. The world took notice, with Morton’s and my very-muchenjoyed steak garnering attention on The Today Show, the NY Post, and hundreds of other media outlets around the world. Morton’s saw a hefty increase in business over the following weeks from one social media event that was created, executed, and over in less than four hours. “BUT HOW DO YOU SCALE SOMETHING LIKE THAT? IT’S NOT POSSIBLE!” was the immediate cry of the social media naysayer. And they had a point – Surely, Morton’s isn’t going to get into the habit of delivering a steak to every weary traveler who happens to be hungry upon a long day’s landing. My reply: Morton’s doesn’t NEED to scale that. They never would, and they shouldn’t. Morton’s isn’t in the business of delivering steaks to airports. I’d even suggest that Morton’s isn’t in the business (much to the surprise of their owners) of serving steaks. Morton’s is in the business of creating amazing customer service experiences. If you look at the comments in the blog post I wrote about the experience, you’ll find that those who’ve dined with Morton’s before weren’t surprised this happened. They all note that Morton’s made their own dining experience a great one, whether it was treating a special occasion accordingly, or keeping the restaurant open for someone who found themselves on a delayed flight. Excellent customer service is taught to, and demanded from every Morton’s employee from Day One -- and it’s that which allows social to scale. Forget about scaling social media. Focus on letting your customers do it for you by amazing them each time they interact with you. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 54
  • The Great Airport Steak-Out: cont’d. Why? Because simply put, we live in a world where customers don’t EXPECT excellent customer service. Customers expect “so-so” service at best, and truly crappy service as the norm. Look at the airlines or mobile phone industry for examples. BUT when a company goes out of their way and succeeds at amazing us, we want to share that. And for the first time, every single customer has the ability to share, in real-time, their amazing experience to their entire network via their smartphone, just like I did with my steak-at-the-airport experience. When every customer is a broadcaster, you don’t NEED to scale your social media. Provide stellar, over-the-top customer service as the standard at your company, and your customers will scale your social media FOR you. They’ll tell friends, and the recommendations will carry and translate into new business, every single time. Again, forget about scaling social media. Focus on training EVERYONE in your company to create amazing customer experiences, each and every time. Do that, and your social media will scale itself by default, thanks to continually amazed customers. “When every customer is a broadcaster, you don’t NEED to scale your social media.” SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 55
  • Thomas Baekdal writes about the ever-changing digital world encompassing social media, marketing, design and technology. He also helps businesses to understand how these changes affect their market and capabilities, providing strategic assistance and advice. You can follow Thomas on Twitter @baekdal or at his personal blog. Is Your Brand Socially Compatible? BY THOMAS BAEKDAL A major factor when scaling up social media for enterprises is how you spend your budgets. In the traditional world of marketing, as you get bigger, you simply increase your spending in proportion to your exposure. That’s why a small company advertises in their local newspaper, while big companies advertise during the Super Bowl. But social media is not about exposure (not directly at least). It’s about influencing individual consumers to buy your product, engage with your communication teams, share your ideas, and tell their friends about you. To do that, you need a small army of people who can influence individuals. Consider this: A Super Bowl commercial might cost $3 million for 30 seconds. For that kind of money, you could hire about 50 people for a year to focus exclusively on being brand advocates and engaging with your consumers. Instead of influencing 100 million people for 30 seconds in a one-shot deal, your team of 50 could influence even more people over a full year. And because it’s based on relationship building, your sales conversion rates are likely to be higher in the long run. There is, of course, a problem with this approach. Many enterprises don’t actually sell a product that people care about. Procter & Gamble is a great example. Their Home Care Division includes the “Ariel” brand of washing detergents. “If you want do social media at scale, you must have a product that people care about following.” It’s a great and very successful product that has been on sale since 1968. Many people like it, prefer it over other brands, and recommend it to their friends. But would you go to Facebook and like a page for a washing detergent? Of course not. You might like the product. You might even recommend it to friends. But it’s not a product that anyone deeply cares about. When you have products like that, spending $3 million to reach 100 million people during the Super Bowl is suddenly a much better deal than hiring 50 brand advocates. Those 50 people would never be able to reach the same volume, because the product is not socially compatible. cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 56
  • Is Your Brand Socially Compatible? cont’d. If you want do social media at scale, you must have a product that people care about following. Take a look at NASA. Arguably, they don’t sell any products, but they are in the business of getting as many people as possible to “buy into the NASA idea.” NASA is one of the few enterprise-sized organizations that does social media at scale really well. Like any other enterprise, they focus their actual communication on niche areas and have hired dedicated brand advocates to engage and interact with the public. Recently, they invited twenty or so social media influencers to NASA Social, an event where NASA brand advocates would show these social media superstars a great time. Did it work? Well, consider that several of these social media superstars had more than a million followers each, and each one of them was tweeting and posting about the event all day. The actual reach was probably a lot higher per dollar than advertising during the Super Bowl. Building social media at enterprise scale is really about three things: 1. Investment -- Instead of scaling up the money you spend on exposure, you scale up the money you spend on brand advocates who can influence and inspire your audience directly. 2. Having a Product That People Truly Care About -- Most enterprises are based on many brands each producing hundreds of individual products and, as a result, don’t appeal to the social world. People like to follow Apple. People don’t like to follow Procter & Gamble. If you are selling toilet paper, ironing boards, lightbulbs, or other everyday products that people need, you will be much better off using traditional advertising. On the other hand, if you are selling surf boards, fashion products, tablets, or barbecue grills, hiring 50 brand advocates to influence and inspire your customers is likely to lead to great results. “The biggest social effect is what happens outside your page.” 3. Personalizing Everything -- With social media, being personal, specific and direct is the secret sauce of social success. What you can scale are the tools, the resources, the processes and the workflows that these people need to efficiently focus on advocating to the consumers. Of course, there is an even easier way to scale up social media for your enterprise. Focus on creating something people care about, something with a great purpose that isn’t “Let’s optimize our revenue stream for our shareholders.” If you make great products for people, based on a purpose that people care about, your social media will scale up all by itself. You might need to give it a push, but the biggest social effect is what happens outside your page. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 57
  • Ready to Scale Your Social Engagement? Here’s a quick assessment to help you discover where you stand. Enterprise Structure For Social Strategy 1. What kind of Corporate Social Team do you have? (check all that apply) 4. How consistent is Social branding with overall branding guidelines? C-level executive with Social oversight - 5 Consistent - 5 Central Social and new technology task force - 4 Somewhat Consistent -4 Dedicated team with one of more FTEs - 3 Inconsistent -3 Enterprise- subject matter experts with social responsibilities - 2 We do not have social branding guidelines -1 2. What kind of Corporate Social Strategy do you have? Defined, Well Executed - 5 Defined, Not Well Executed -4 Defined, Somewhat Executed -3 Undefined -2 3. How is visibility managed across corporate social properties? Full Visibility and Audited -5 Full Visibility-Enterprise-wide -4 5. What of the following does your company currently have? (check all that apply) Company-wide social goals - 5 Company-wide training for social - 4 Formal social crisis plan and action log - 3 Procedures for handling social engagement -2 Social HR policies -1 6. For these policies, procedures and how much have they been adopted and enforced internally? Visibility-Business Unit Level -3 Existing, broadly adopted, strictly enforced -5 Visibility-Team Level -2 Existing, broadly adopted, loosely enforced -4 No visibility -1 Existing, but not broadly adopted -3 N/A - 0 cont’d. next page >> SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 58
  • Ready to Scale Your Social Engagement? con’t. Existing Functional Capabilities of Your Social Tools 1. MARKETING 3. CRISIS MANAGEMENT Does the Marketing team___________ (3 points for each) Does the team responsible for Crisis Preparation and Management do any of the following? (2 points for each) Associate every outgoing message with a campaign and keyword(s)? Report on campaign performance across all social networks? Amplify social communications with internal content suggestions? Support multiple social channels? Obtain a universal view of your customer regardless of social network? Build Social Applications for deployment on Web or Social Platforms? Prepare and deploy approved templates for enterprise-wide coordinated response? Effectively collaborate among multiple teams and track resolution of each inbound message? Leverage workflows to ensure the appropriate teams review responses to sensitive and highly visible incoming messages Automatically identify key influencers related to the issue? 4. HUMAN RESOURCES Does HR____ (1 point each) 2. CUSTOMER SERVICE AND FEEDBACK Recruit employees via Social Applications? Does the Customer Service & Feedback group ____________ (2 points for each) Monitor compliance with corporate social media policies and guidelines? Obtain, route, and respond to customer inquiries via Social Feedback Application? Use automatic and manual workflow to route and escalate messages? Activity monitor employee discussion about the corporation online? cont’d. next page >> Automatically analyze sentiment, intent, and priority of each social message? Have a process for handing PII and other sensitive information? Categorize and report on incoming issue types SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 59
  • Ready to Scale Your Social Engagement? cont’d. 5. SOCIAL GOVERNANCE 7. MOBILE Can Social Governance be Centrally Managed by _________ (3 points for each) Can all elements of your Social Strategy be executed from mobile platforms? Assigning permissions to every person based on role, team, and responsibility from one place? Tracking every interaction and all activity enterprise-wide? Removing and adding new users to relevant social properties from a central location? Creating templates for social apps with object and branding “lock down”? Yes (3) No (2) Not Sure (1) RESULTS next page >> 6. SCALABILITY Can the Enterprise effectively handle significant growth or unexpected spikes in messages by automating: (3 points for each) the routing and scoring of all inbound social messages? scoring, ranking, and tagging of community members by participation levels, influence, or custom properties? workflows based on business rules, internal roles, and policies? SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 60
  • Ready to Scale Your Social Engagement? con’t. RESULTS If you scored…. 0-39 points Your Enterprise is Social@Scale Level 1 Maturity. Recommendation: A Social@Scale: Strategy Session to ensure the right framework is put in place now. 40- 74 points Your Enterprise is Social@Scale Level 2 Maturity. You may be looking for an enterprise-wide solution. Recommendation: Review the “6 Must Haves for Every Enterprise Social RFP” . 75-100 points Your organization is Social@Scale Level 3 Maturity. Recommendation: Allow us to feature you on SprinklrTV so other Practitioners can learn from your expertise. SHARE THIS E-BOOK: SOCIAL@SCALE | 61
  • Sprinklr How the Enterprise Does Social@Scale www.sprinklr.com