Art 19 Foreshortening

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  • Alexander Mosaic, c. 100 B.C.E., tessera mosaic from the House of the Faun, Pompeii, 8 feet 11 inches x 16 feet 9 inches (this Roman floor mosaic may be based on a lost Hellenistic painting by Philoxenos of Eretria, The Battle of Issus, c. 315 B.C.E.), Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.
    Note on the battle:Scholars continue to debate whether this mosaic depicts the Battle of Issus in 333 B.C.E. or the Battle of Gaugamela two years later in 331.
    Note on the mosaic replica installed in the House of the Faun, Pompeii:The original mosaic was uncovered at the House of the Faun in 1841 and moved to Naples two years later. A replica mosaic was installed at the House of the Faun in 2005.
  • Andrea Mantegna’s Dead Christ (1480)
  • Art 19 Foreshortening

    1. 1. Foreshortening: creating the illusion of depth in a figure drawing
    2. 2. One of the earliest extant examples of foreshortening in the history of art: The Roman Alexander and Darius Mosaic from the 1st Century AD
    3. 3. Closer forms are larger in scale. Individual volumes of the body overlap one another in space. Intervals of space between parts of the body are dramatically shortened.
    4. 4. Exaggerating the scale of closer forms will pull them forward into space.
    5. 5. Think of the lines of the body like perspective orthogonals projecting forward or backward into space.
    6. 6. Michelangelo (16th C. Italian)
    7. 7. Paul Cadmus (20th C. American) (Example of subtle foreshortening)
    8. 8. Paul Cadmus Where is the foreshortening here?
    9. 9. De La Tour 18th C. French) (An example of foreshortening in the face.)
    10. 10. Student work: charcoal pencil on toned paper
    11. 11. Student work: Pastel
    12. 12. Student work: Graphite
    13. 13. Student work: Charcoal
    14. 14. Student work: Charcoal
    15. 15. Student work: Conte
    16. 16. Student work: Conte
    17. 17. Student work: Conte
    18. 18. Student work: Charcoal Pencil
    19. 19. Student work: pen and ink
    20. 20. OK: let’s do foreshortening!

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