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Why People Share
 

Why People Share

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social science research that powers Upworthy

social science research that powers Upworthy

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    Why People Share Why People Share Presentation Transcript

    • WHY DO PEOPLE SHARE? Hong Qu February 3, 2012 Upriser team retreat Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Topics Psychology theory Academic and industry research Content pattern recognition Next steps for Product and UX Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Socio-technical system Actors Activities Goals (objective) Scenarios Context (in situ) Behavior norms Activity Theory in Wikipedia Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Maslow's hierarchy of needs Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • What do people share? Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • What do people share? News Emotional state or mood Photos Family Opinions Possessions Location Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • What do people share? News Inspiration Emotional state or mood Professional expertise Photos Affirmation Family Learned something new Opinions Funny Possessions Activity Location Games Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • What motivates sharing? to bring valuable and entertaining content to others to define ourselves to others to keep in touch with weak ties we don’t see to grow and nourish relationships to evangelize causes or brands to get people to organize to affect an outcome Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Sharing feedback loop Ambient telepresence (feeling of being near using technology) Recipient becomes sender becomes recipient Reciprocate Light-weight interactions (like, comment) Positive reinforcement Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Active vs Passive Sharing Foursquare Instagram Twitter Spotify Washington Post Social Reader Facebook games Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Sense of Agency and Urgency Affect outcome (my vote counts) Getting more people to vote with me counts even more Control the message Uplifting impact on recipient’s mood Must have a sense of urgency Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Why people don’t share Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Why people don’t share Privacy Unknown audience Exposing yourself to judgement Don’t feel a sense of control Construction different identities for different groups of friends Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Why people don’t share Privacy Unknown audience Exposing yourself to judgement Don’t feel a sense of control Construction different identities for different groups of friends Thursday, February 2, 2012 Like to consume guilty pleasures, but don’t want anyone to know Self censoring Socially awkwardness to bring up controversial issues Cannot unshare Easy to copy and forward
    • Research on emotion valence Will You Be E-Mailing This Column? It’s Awesome People preferred e-mailing articles with positive rather than negative themes, and they liked to send long articles on intellectually challenging topics. More emotional stories were more likely to be e-mailed emotion of self-transcendence, a feeling of admiration and elevation in the face of something greater than the self. Sharing recipes or financial tips or medical advice makes sense according to classic economic utility theory: I give you something of practical value in the hope that you’ll someday return the favor. There can also be self-interested reasons for sharing surprising articles: I get to show off how well informed I am by sending news that will shock you. “Emotion in general leads to transmission, and awe is quite a strong emotion,” he said. “If I’ve just read this story that changes the way I understand the world and myself, I want to talk to others about what it means. I want to proselytize and share the feeling of awe. If you read the article and feel the same emotion, it will bring us closer together.” Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • Emotional valence Viral Content: Why We Share Some Things and Not Others Thursday, February 2, 2012
    • References Activity Theory The Psychology of Sharing - NY Times Research What Makes online Content Viral Designing with Psychology in Mind Presentation of Self in Everyday Life Thursday, February 2, 2012