Type Posters

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My type poster project from typography class at Academy of Art University.

My type poster project from typography class at Academy of Art University.

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  • 1. E e Humanistic Gardale Transitional Didone Slab Serif Glyphic Script Lineale Transitionals are some of the most commonly used text faces today. The designs of these faces emphasized the mechanical rather than the calligraphic. They are called Transitional because they are the faces that bridged the gap from “Old Style” faces (Humanist and Garalde) to the next category of type, which is called “Modern.” Characteristics of this typeface are higher contrast, larger apertures (counters), larger x-heights and their vertical axis (stress).ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQ R ST UVW A f oXY Z a b c d e fghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
  • 2. Humanistic Gardale Transitional Didone Slab Serif d Glyphic Script LinealeDaee Garadale category is named after the French typographer Claude Garamond (1480–1561). The faces in this category are all inspired by the letterforms of this master typographer. Five hundred years later, many of the most popular text faces today are from this category. These are faces ABCD EFGH IJKL MNOP QRSTo UVW that are similar to Humanist faces but they have moved one step XYZ away from the pen-drawn quali- abcd ties of those faces. These faces efgh have greater contrast between ijkl their thicks and thins. mnop qrst uvw xyz
  • 3. HumanisticGardale Inspired by the letterforms of Nicolas Jenson (1420–1480) as this is theTransitional oldest category of roman letterformsRDidone created in metal type, the letters have many of the same characteristics of pen-drawnSlab Serif forms.These typefaces have an elegance andGlyphic classicism and work well as text faces alongside Blackletter display type.Script Characteristics of these typefaces include,Lineale the sloped bar on the lowercase e and their slanted axis (stress), and lowest contrast. ABCD EFGH IJKL MNOP Q R ST UVW XY Z abcd a ef gh ijkl mnop qrst uvw xyz e or
  • 4. S abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ Script faces resemble cursive handwriting. In many of these faces, each form has connecting strokes that will form a junction to adjacent letterforms and mimic the continuous flow of handwriting. Also, scripts are designed to be set as upper and lowercase, never as all caps. Since most scripts are low in legibility and quite decorative, these letterforms are best used in small quantities as accent characters rather than for long passages of text. Often used in food packagin, because it looks handmade, and give impression of handmade food. Also, scripts are in wide use on greeting cards and wedding invitations to make these pi items seem like more personalized messages. istic an le Hum arda l G ona n siti ne Tra Dido if Ser c lab yphi S l G ript Sc le L inea t
  • 5. Di Humanistic Slab Serif Gardale Didone Transitional GlyphicScriptdoLineale r o b A r and s a a ty the e h e D w b Dido v u ,” n of ha e catego casu and ne elegant faces ha had contr l. Didone er seem permane ve The st of all s have th informal t unbr erifs on the type e highes r a ball ckected idones lassificat te ar of A a c, f, rminals airlines. re horizo ons. on th c , e arm lso note tal, s the g of the a, . r on p nd-drawn y rejecte on a re geom forms an all aspe e dot, attista B category constru sed o by th ho were doni an is name ted done work th both gre Firmin D for a n the a a “dr in Engla t John B tly inspir i- e n quali ssed up d. These askerville d i d t o n d Giam grid. The tric form d were b cts s e d c a ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
  • 6. G ylABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZp B O m Q ce s are bas These fa led or cut on chise s rather than ed letterform n forms. They p pen-drawhave small, shar typically ajuscules had serifs. M rves to facilitate ny fewer cu which is why ma carving, typefaces containr Glyphic ital letterforms o only cap ps. Glyphic small ca s are intended typeface as display for use t text type. type, no c istic an ale Hum Gard al Tr D ition ne ans ido f eri i b S hic Sla lyp t G crip S le Li nea
  • 7. These are the faces with heavy square serifs that were designed in theearly 1800s to meet the demands of a newly industrialized society. A B C D EWith this relationship to the Industrial Revolution, these faces havea real “workhorse” feel about them. A London type founder, Robert F G H I J KThorne, coined the name “Egyptian” for his work on slab serifdisplay typefaces, which reflected the feel of the massive structures, L M N O Pand the name stuck. Slab serifs were widely used on broadside post-ers, handbills and advertising during the Industrial Revolution. In Q R S T Uaddition, Napoleon reportedly used these faces in message relaysbecause they were clear enough for his soldiers to see through tele- V W X Y Zscopes over long distances.There are three kinds of slab serif types.Regular slab serifs are low in contrast (strokes and serifs are often the abcdefghisame thickness) and have unbracketed slab serifs. Clarendons have jklmnopqAbbracketed slab serifs, a bit more contrast and ball terminals. Type-writer faces are monospaced slab serifs. rstuvwxyz r Humanistic Gardale Transitional Didone Slab Serif Glyphic Script Lineale Slab Serif
  • 8. jIn the early 20th century, circles,squares and triangles became the A B C D Esymbols of the new industrial soci- F G H I J Kety. Design movements like de Stijland Constructivism along with the L M N O Pphilosophy of the Bauhaus laid thegroundwork for the development of Q R S T Ugeometric typefaces. These typefaceswere the manifestation of a new de- V W X Y Zsign attitude.These faces have very abcdefghilow contrast (most have almost none)and are constructed of purely geo- jklmnopqmetric shapes without reference topen-drawn forms. Most Lineale Geo- rstuvwxyzmetric faces have a single-story low-ercase a and for this reason, they do cnot make very legible text faces.A Lineale Geometric Humanistic Gardale Transitional Didone Slab Serif Glyphic Script Lineale
  • 9. These faces are more legible and have a warmer feeling than anyof the other kinds of Lineales.Many Lineale Humanist faces have A B C D Ea true-drawn italic rather than an oblique companion face. Slanted F G H I J Kroman forms are called oblique. The Lineales we’ve studied up tonow have all had obliques. A true-drawn (or genuine) italic is one L M N O Pwhere the italic letterforms are distinct forms rather than slantedversions of the roman forms. By the way, most serif text faces have Q R S T Ua genuine italic companion face. Remember that the term “Human-ist” derives from the humanist handwriting of 15th century Italy.In V W X Y Zaddition, several of the Lineale Humanist typefaces designed in the abcdefghilate 20th century have matching small caps and old-style figures.McThe availability of a true italic, small caps and old-style figures in jklmnopqthese Lineale Humanist faces also contribute to their warmth andflexibility. rstuvwxyza Lineale Humanistic Humanistic Gardale Transitional Didone Slab Serif Glyphic Script Lineale
  • 10. A A a f B bT t C c o D d E e F f G g H h I i J j K k L l Humanistic Mm 2 1 Garalde N n 3 4 Transitional O o 5 P p 6 7 Didone Q q 8 9 Slab SerifTransitional are some of the most commonly used text faces today. The de-signs of these faces emphasized the mechanical rather than the calligraphic. R r 0They are called Transitional because they are the faces that bridged the gap Glyphic S sfrom “Old Style” faces (Humanist and Garalde) to the next category of type,which is called “Modern.” Characteristics of this typeface are higher contrast,larger apertures (counters), larger x-heights and their vertical axis (stress). T t Script U u Lineale V v Ww X x Y y Z z
  • 11. J j JGaralde category is named after the French typographerClaude Garamond (1480–1561). The faces in this categoryare all inspired by the letterforms of this master typogra-pher. Five hundred years later, many of the most populartext faces today are from this category. These are faces thatare similar to Humanist faces but they have moved one stepaway from the pen-drawn qualities of those faces. Thesefaces have greater contrast between their thicks and thins. a e o Humanistic Garalde Transitional Didone Slab Serif Glyphic Script Lineale A a B b C c Dd E e F f G g Hh I i J j K k L l Mm 2 Nn 3 Oo 5 P p Qq 8 T t U u V v Ww X x Y y Z z 1 4 6 7 9 R r 0 S s
  • 12. I a e A a B b I i C c o D d E e F f G g Hh I i J j K k L l Humanistic Mm 1 2 Garalde Nn 3 4 O o Transitional P p 5 6 Didone 7 Q q 8 9 Slab SerifInspired by the letterforms of Nicholas Jenson (1420–1480) asthis is the oldest category of roman letterforms created in metal R r 0type, the letters have many of the same characteristics of pen- S sdrawn forms. These typefaces have an elegance and classicismand work well as text faces alongside Blackletter display type.Characteristics of these typefaces include, the sloped bar on the Glyphic T tlowercase e and their slanted axis (stress), and lowest contrast. Script U u Lineale V v Ww X x Y y Z z
  • 13. DidoneGaraldeGlyphicHumanistLinealeScriptSlab serifTransitionalTr·an·si·tio·nal 1. This entire category would not have existed but for the efforts of John Baskerville (1706–1775). As an inventor, he had made advances in papermaking (smoother, whiter paper), ink (darker) and printing (more pressure) which led him to redesign letterforms for these technological improvements. While to our mod- ern eyes these faces might seem ordinary, Baskerville’s types were considered outlandish in the 1700s in England. According to some reports, his books were criticized as being a potential cause of blindness. Tran- sitionals (along with Garaldes) are some of the most commonly used text faces today. The designs of these faces emphasized the mechanical rather than the calligraphic. They are called Transitional because they are the faces that bridged the gap from “Old Style” faces (Humanist and Garalde) to the next category of type, which is called “Modern.” Transitional faces can be identified by their higher contrast, larger apertures (counters), larger x-heights and their vertical axis (stress). 2. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 3. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 5. Afo
  • 14. DidoneGaraldeGlyphic Ga·ra·ldeHumanistLinealeScriptSlab serifTransitional1. The second type category is named for the French typographer Claude Garamond (1480–1561).The faces in this category are all inspired by the letterforms of this master typographer. Five hundredyears later, many of the most popular text faces today are from this category. These are faces that aresimilar to Humanist faces but they have moved one step away from the pen-drawn qualities of thosefaces. Unlike Humanist faces, these faces have a horizontal bar on the e and greater contrast betweentheir thicks and thins. Their axis is only slightly sloped. In many simplified type classification sys-tems, the first two Vox categories of Humanist and Garalde are called “Old Style.”2. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z3. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 05. aeeo
  • 15. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab serif Transitional Gl·yp·hic1. These are faces that are based on chiseled or cut letterformsrather than pen-drawn forms. They typically have small, sharp ser-ifs. As you may recall from Module 1, our uppercase letterformscame from the inscribed forms on Trajan’s column. Majusculeshad fewer curves to facilitate carving. This is why many Glyphictypefaces contain only capital letterforms or small caps. Glyphictypefaces are intended for use as display type, not text type.2. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 04. BOMQ
  • 16. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional Lineale Geometric Q A j c In the early 20th century, circles, squares and triangles became the symbols of the new industrial society. Design movements like de Stijl and Constructivism along with the philosophy of the Bau- haus laid the groundwork for the development of geometric typefaces. These typefaces were the manifestation of a new design attitude. These faces have very low contrast (most have almost none) and are constructed of purely geometric shapes without reference to pen-drawn forms. Most Lineale Geometric faces have a single-story lowercase a and for this reason, they do not make very legible text faces. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Avant Garde, Avenir, Eurostile, Futura, Kabel
  • 17. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif TransitionalLineale Neo-Grotesque Q a e R Helvetica has been called “the face without features.” Designed by Edouard Hoffman and Max Mied- inger, it was originally released as New Haas Grotesk in 1957. It was reissued and renamed Hel- vetica (from the Latin word Helvetier, the name of the people who once lived in the area which came to be known as Switzerland) in 1961 in order to compete with the popularity of Univers amongst the Swiss International Style designers. Helvetica is so ubiquitous that it’s almost invisible ― street signs, logos, mastheads, packaging, posters ― wherever you are, Helvetica is never far away. The version of the face called Helvetica Neue has been redrawn for consistency amongst all the many weights and widths of Helvetica. These days, it’s the only version of Helvetica professional designers use. Helvetica Neue is available in 26 variations. Helvetica has a slightly larger x-height than Univers and more curves ― most notably on the bowl of the lowercase a and the leg of capital R. The large x-height allows for greater play in leading. The face sets tightly and works best with generous tracking at small (7pt or below) text sizes. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST UVW XY Z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica, Univers
  • 18. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional Q Lineale Grotesque a g k The delicate elegance of Transitionals and Didones had become familiar to many people and the earliest sans serifs were seen as shocking and vulgar ― hence it is sometimes referred to as “Grotesque.” Like slab serifs, sans serifs were widely used for advertising and broadsides and worked well to “shout the loudest” over the increasing clutter in the industrialized marketplace. In the US, gro- tesques were called “gothic,” a term that meant Blackletter type in Europe. “Gothic” is believed to be in reference to the architectural form. You can identify Grotesques by their two-story lowercase g. Compared to Univers or Helvetica, these faces have a bulky, rough, unadorned look; yet, because of their origins in the 19th cen- tury, they never seem overly plain or stiff. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Bureau Grotesque, Franklin Gothic, News Gothic, Trade Gothic, HTF Knockout
  • 19. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional & Slab Serif AbrABCD These are faces inspired by the letterforms abcd of Nicolas Jenson (1420–1480). JensonEFGH was French but had traveled to Germany eghh to learn printing in Mainz (Gutenberg’sIJKL town). Instead of returning to France, he ijkl set up his press in Venice, and that is why mnopMNOP this category is also called Venetian. As thisQRST is the oldest category of roman letterforms qrst created in metal type, the letters have manyUVW of the same characteristics of pen-drawn uvw forms. These typefaces have an eleganceXYZ and classicism and work well as text faces xyz alongside Blackletter display type. You can identify these faces by the sloped bar on the lowercase e and their slanted axis (stress). Humanist faces are the lowest contrast (that means there is the least difference between thick and thin parts of the stroke) of the serif text faces.
  • 20. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional Garalde&ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRST aeeo 1. The second type category is named for the French typographer Claude Garamond (1480–1561). The faces in this category are all inspired by the letterforms of this master typographer. Five hundred years later, many of the most popular text faces today are from this category. These are faces that are simi- lar to Humanist faces but they have moved one step away from the pen-drawn quali- abcd eghh ijkl mnop qrstUVW ties of those faces. Unlike Humanist faces, uvw these faces have a horizontal bar on the eXYZ and greater contrast between their thicks and xyz thins. Their axis is only slightly sloped. In many simplified type classification systems, the first two Vox categories of Humanist and Garalde are called “Old Style.”
  • 21. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional &Lineale Humanist JacMABCD These are faces inspired by the letterforms abcd of Nicolas Jenson (1420–1480). Jenson wasEFGH French but had traveled to Germany to eghh learn printing in Mainz (Gutenberg’s town).IJKL Instead of returning to France, he set up ijkl his press in Venice, and that is why this cat- mnopMNOP egory is also called Venetian. As this is theQRST oldest category of roman letterforms cre- qrst ated in metal type, the letters have manyUVW of the same characteristics of pen-drawn uvw forms. These typefaces have an eleganceXYZ and classicism and work well as text faces xyz alongside Blackletter display type. You can identify these faces by the sloped bar on the lowercase e and their slanted axis (stress). Humanist faces are the lowest con- trast (that means there is the least differ- ence between thick and thin parts of the stroke) of the serif text faces.
  • 22. A F K O E aeeo B G L P C H M Q D I E N R J S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z The second type category is named for the French typographer Claude Garamond (1480–1561). The faces in this category are all inspired by the letterforms of this master typographer. Five hundred years later, many of the most popular text faces today are from this category. These are faces that are similar to Humanist faces but they have moved one step away from the pen-drawn qualities of those faces. Unlike Humanist faces, these faces have a horizontal bar on the e and greater contrast between their thicks and thins. Their axis is only slightly sloped. In many simplified type classification systems, the first two Vox categories of Humanist and Garalde are called “Old Style.”Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional
  • 23. A F K O E Afo B G L P C H M Q D I E N R J S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z This entire category would not have existed but for the efforts of John Baskerville (1706–1775). As an inventor, he had made advances in papermaking (smoother, whiter paper), ink (darker) and printing (more pressure) which led him to redesign letterforms for these technological improvements. While to our modern eyes these faces might seem ordinary, Baskerville’s types were considered outlandish in the 1700s in England. According to some reports, his books were criticized as being a potential cause of blindness.Transitionals (along with Garaldes) are some of the most commonly used text faces today.The designs of these faces emphasized the mechanical rather than the calligraphic.They are calledTransitional because they are the faces that bridged the gap from “Old Style” faces (Humanist and Garalde) to the next category of type, which is called “Modern.” Transitional faces can be identified by their higher contrast, larger apertures (counters), larger x-heights and their vertical axis (stress).Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional
  • 24. A F K O EAbr B G L P C H M Q D I E N R J S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z These are faces inspired by the letterforms of Nicolas Jenson (1420–1480). Jenson was French but had traveled to Germany to learn printing in Mainz (Gutenberg’s town). Instead of returning to France, he set up his press in Venice, and that is why this category is also called Venetian. As this is the oldest category of roman let- terforms created in metal type, the letters have many of the same characteristics of pen-drawn forms. These typefaces have an ele- gance and classicism and work well as text faces alongside Black- letter display type. You can identify these faces by the sloped bar on the lowercase e and their slanted axis (stress). Humanist faces are the lowest contrast (that means there is the least difference between thick and thin parts of the stroke) of the serif text faces.Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional
  • 25. Glyphic These are faces that are based on chiseled or cut letterforms rather than pen-drawn forms. They typically ABCD have small, sharp serifs. Didone As you may recall from EFGH Garalde Module 1, our upper- Glyphic case letterforms came IJKL Humanist from the inscribed forms on Trajan’s col- MNOP Lineale Script umn. Majuscules had QRST fewer curves to facili- Slab serif tate carving. This is UVWTransitional why many Glyphic type- faces contain only XYZ capital letterforms or small caps. Glyphic typefaces are intended for use as display type, not text type. BOMQ
  • 26. Transitional This entire category would not have existed but for the efforts of John Basker- ville (1706–1775). As an inventor, he had made advances in papermaking (smoother, whiter paper), ink (darker) and printing (more pressure) which led him to rede- sign letterforms for these technological Aa Bb Cc Dd Didone improvements. While to our modern eyes these faces might seem ordinary, Basker- Ee Ff Gg Hh Garalde ville’s types were considered outlandish in Glyphic the 1700s in England. According to some Ii Jj Kk Ll Humanist reports, his books were criticized as being a potential cause of blindness. Transition- Mm Nn Oo Pp Lineale Script als (along with Garaldes) are some of the Qq Rr Ss Tt Slab serif most commonly used text faces today. The designs of these faces emphasized the Uu Vv WwTransitional mechanical rather than the calligraphic. They are called Transitional because they Xx Yy Zz are the faces that bridged the gap from “Old Style” faces (Humanist and Garalde) to the next category of type, which is called “Modern.” Transitional faces can be identified by their higher contrast, larger apertures (counters), larger x-heights and their vertical axis (stress). Afo
  • 27. Garalde The second type category is named for the French typographer Claude Garamond (1480–1561). The faces in this category are all inspired by the letterforms of this master Aa Bb Cc Dd typographer. Five hundred years Didone later, many of the most popu- Ee Ff Gg Hh Garalde lar text faces today are from this Glyphic category. These are faces that are Ii Jj Kk Ll Humanist similar to Humanist faces but they Mm Nn Oo Pp Lineale have moved one step away from Script the pen-drawn qualities of those Qq Rr Ss Tt Slab serif faces. Unlike Humanist faces, these faces have a horizontal bar on the e Uu Vv WwTransitional and greater contrast between their thicks and thins. Their axis is only Xx Yy Zz slightly sloped. In many simplified type classification systems, the first two Vox categories of Humanist and Garalde are called “Old Style.” aeeo
  • 28. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab serif Transitional Slab ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijkl mnopqrstuvwxyzA b r Serif These are faces inspired by the letterforms of Nicolas Jenson (1420–1480). Jenson was French but had traveled to Germany to learn printing in Mainz (Gutenberg’s town). Instead of returning to France, he set up his press in Venice, and that is why this category is also called Venetian. As this is the oldest category of roman letterforms created in metal type, the letters have many of the same characteristics of pen-drawn forms. These typefaces have an ele- gance and classicism and work well as text faces alongside Blackletter display type. You can iden- tify these faces by the sloped bar on the lower- case e and their slanted axis (stress). Humanist faces are the lowest contrast (that means there is the least difference between thick and thin parts of the stroke) of the serif text faces.
  • 29. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab serif Transitional Lineale ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijkl mnopqrstuvwxyzJ a c M Humanist These are faces inspired by the letterforms of Nicolas Jenson (1420–1480). Jenson was French but had traveled to Germany to learn printing in Mainz (Gutenberg’s town). Instead of return- ing to France, he set up his press in Venice, and that is why this category is also called Venetian. As this is the oldest category of roman letter- forms created in metal type, the letters have many of the same characteristics of pen-drawn forms. These typefaces have an elegance and classicism and work well as text faces along- side Blackletter display type. You can identify these faces by the sloped bar on the lowercase e and their slanted axis (stress). Humanist faces are the lowest contrast (that means there is the least difference between thick and thin parts of the stroke) of the serif text faces.
  • 30. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab serif TransitionalLineale ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijkl mnopqrstuvwxyzA j c Geometric In the early 20th century, circles, squares and triangles became the symbols of the new industrial society. Design movements like de Stijl and Constructivism along with the phi- losophy of the Bauhaus laid the groundwork for the development of geometric typefaces. These typefaces were the manifestation of a new design attitude. These faces have very low contrast (most have almost none) and are constructed of purely geometric shapes without reference to pen-drawn forms. Most Lineale Geometric faces have a single-story lowercase a and for this reason, they do not make very legible text faces.
  • 31. DidoneGaraldeGlyphicHumanistLinealeScriptSlab serifTr·an·si·tio·nal1. This entire category would not have existed but for the efforts of John Baskerville (1706–1775). As an inventor, he had made advances in papermaking (smoother, whiter paper), ink(darker) and printing (more pressure) which led him to redesign letterforms for these tech-nological improvements. While to our modern eyes these faces might seem ordinary, Basker-ville’s types were considered outlandish in the 1700s in England. According to some reports,his books were criticized as being a potential cause of blindness. Transitionals (along withGaraldes) are some of the most commonly used text faces today. The designs of these facesemphasized the mechanical rather than the calligraphic. They are called Transitional becausethey are the faces that bridged the gap from “Old Style” faces (Humanist and Garalde) to thenext category of type, which is called “Modern.” Transitional faces can be identified by theirhigher contrast, larger apertures (counters), larger x-heights and their vertical axis (stress).2. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z3. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 05. Afo
  • 32. DidoneGa·ra·lde1. The second type category is named for the French typographer Claude Garamond (1480–1561).The faces in this category are all inspired by the letterforms of this master typographer. Five hun-dred years later, many of the most popular text faces today are from this category. These are facesthat are similar to Humanist faces but they have moved one step away from the pen-drawn qualitiesof those faces. Unlike Humanist faces, these faces have a horizontal bar on the e and greater contrastbetween their thicks and thins. Their axis is only slightly sloped. In many simplified type classifica-tion systems, the first two Vox categories of Humanist and Garalde are called “Old Style.”2. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z3. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 05. aeeoGlyphicHumanistLinealeScriptSlab serif
  • 33. DidoneGaraldeGl·yp·hic1. These are faces that are based on chiseled or cut letter-forms rather than pen-drawn forms. They typically havesmall, sharp serifs. As you may recall from Module 1, ouruppercase letterforms came from the inscribed forms onTrajan’s column. Majuscules had fewer curves to facilitatecarving. This is why many Glyphic typefaces contain onlycapital letterforms or small caps. Glyphic typefaces areintended for use as display type, not text type.2. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 04. BOMQHumanistLinealeScriptSlab serif
  • 34. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif Transitional Lineale Geometric Q A j c In the early 20th century, circles, squares and triangles became the symbols of the new industrial society. Design movements like de Stijl and Constructivism along with the philosophy of the Bau- haus laid the groundwork for the development of geometric typefaces. These typefaces were the manifestation of a new design attitude. These faces have very low contrast (most have almost none) and are constructed of purely geometric shapes without reference to pen-drawn forms. Most Lineale Geometric faces have a single-story lowercase a and for this reason, they do not make very legible text faces. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Avant Garde, Avenir, Eurostile, Futura, Kabel
  • 35. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif TransitionalLineale Grotesque Q a g k The delicate elegance of Transitionals and Didones had become familiar to many people and the earliest sans serifs were seen as shocking and vulgar ― hence it is sometimes referred to as “Grotesque.” Like slab serifs, sans serifs were widely used for advertising and broadsides and worked well to “shout the loudest” over the increasing clutter in the industrialized marketplace. In the US, gro- tesques were called “gothic,” a term that meant Blackletter type in Europe. “Gothic” is believed to be in reference to the architectural form. You can identify Grotesques by their two-story lowercase g. Compared to Univers or Helvetica, these faces have a bulky, rough, unadorned look; yet, because of their origins in the 19th cen- tury, they never seem overly plain or stiff. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Bureau Grotesque, Franklin Gothic, News Gothic, Trade Gothic, HTF Knockout
  • 36. Didone Garalde Glyphic Humanist Lineale Script Slab Serif TransitionalLineale Neo-Grotesque Q a e R Helvetica has been called “the face without features.” Designed by Edouard Hoffman and Max Miedinger, it was originally released as New Haas Grotesk in 1957. It was reissued and renamed Hel- vetica (from the Latin word Helvetier, the name of the people who once lived in the area which came to be known as Switzerland) in 1961 in order to compete with the popularity of Univers amongst the Swiss International Style designers. Helvetica is so ubiquitous that it’s almost invisible ― street signs, logos, mastheads, packaging, posters ― wherever you are, Helvetica is never far away. The version of the face called Helvetica Neue has been redrawn for consistency amongst all the many weights and widths of Helvetica. These days, it’s the only version of Helvetica professional designers use. Helvetica Neue is available in 26 variations. Helvetica has a slightly larger x-height than Univers and more curves ― most notably on the bowl of the lowercase a and the leg of capital R. The large x-height allows for greater play in leading. The face sets tightly and works best with generous tracking at small (7pt or below) text sizes. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST UVW XY Z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica, Univers
  • 37. Humanist Garalde Transitional Didone Slab Serif Lineale Glyphic Script Lineale Geometric Q A j c In the early 20th century, circles, squares and triangles became the symbols of the new industrial society. Design movements like de Stijl and Constructivism along with the philosophy of the Bau- haus laid the groundwork for the development of geometric typefaces. These typefaces were the manifestation of a new design attitude. These faces have very low contrast (most have almost none) and are constructed of purely geometric shapes without reference to pen-drawn forms. Most Lineale Geometric faces have a single-story lowercase a and for this reason, they do not make very legible text faces. Avant Garde, Avenir, Eurostile, Futura, Kabel ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890
  • 38. Humanist Garalde Transitional Didone Slab Serif Lineale Glyphic ScriptLineale Neo-Grotesque Q a e R These faces are similar to Grotesques but they have a little less contrast and a single-story lowercase g. Their lower contrast gives these faces a more “designed” look because they have taken one step away from the modulation of pen-drawn strokes. The jaws of letters like C are slightly more open than in Grotesques (and they will continue to become more open as we progress through the evolution of Lineales). By the mid-20th century, sans serif type in a wide range of weights came to epitomize moder- nity. These faces easily accommodated modern design’s abstract, intellectual attitudes. Akzidenz Grotesk, Helvetica, Univers, Bell Centennial A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST UVW XY Z abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890
  • 39. Humanist Garalde Transitional Didone Slab Serif Lineale Glyphic Script Lineale Grotesque Q a g k The delicate elegance of Transitionals and Didones had become familiar to many people and the earliest sans serifs were seen as shocking and vulgar ― hence it is sometimes referred to as “Grotesque.” Like slab serifs, sans serifs were widely used for advertising and broadsides and worked well to “shout the loudest” over the increasing clutter in the industrialized market- place. In the US, grotesques were called “gothic,” a term that meant Blackletter type in Europe. “Gothic” is believed to be in reference to the architectural form. You can identify Grotesques by their two-story lowercase g. Compared to Univers or Helvetica, these faces have a bulky, rough, unadorned look; yet, because of their origins in the 19th cen- tury, they never seem overly plain or stiff. Bureau Grotesque, Franklin Gothic, News Gothic, Trade Gothic, HTF Knockout ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890