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466 feminist new_media

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  • 1. Feminist counter cinema– does this film address me as a woman?– does it employ some sort of re-vision? Strategies– disjunction between image and voice – new kinds of narrative space – creating a subjective space – new forms of address – redefining public and private – creating a new language of desire
  • 2. “Maedchen in Uniform,” Leontine Sagan, 1931
  • 3. “Jeanne Dielman,” Chanal Akerman, 1974
  • 4. “Born in Flames,” Lizzie Borden, 1983
  • 5. “A Question of Silence,” Marlene Gorris, 1981
  • 6. Feminist video art, 1970s– process-oriented work – documentary – performance– experimental narrative
  • 7. “Joan Jonas,” Vertical Roll, 1972
  • 8. “All Vision,” an electro/opto/mechanical environment, Steina Vasluka, 1976
  • 9. Feminist video art, 1980s + 1990s – video essays– personal diary, confessional pieces – installation – experimental narrative
  • 10. “Trick or Drink,” Vanalyn Green, 1985
  • 11. Feminist Net-based artand interactive media art 1990s
  • 12. VNS Matrix. 1991-1997
  • 13. VNS Matrix, Cybermanifesto for the 21st Century, 1991
  • 14. VNS Matrix: Bitch Mutant Manifesto
  • 15. OBN: Old Boys Network, 1997-2003
  • 16. “F-e-mail,” Victoria Vesna, 1998F-e-mail & Beyond is part of an evolving network of women workingon top of the Grid, in the Belly of the Beast...Women artists working with this network are serving as role models helping debunk the mythology which is alienating women from technology.
  • 17. “She Loves it, She Loves it Not,” Christine Tamblyn, 1993
  • 18. “Mistaken Identities,” Christine Tamblyn, 1996
  • 19. “Mauve Desert,” Adriene Jenik, 1997
  • 20. “Brandon,” Shu Lea Cheang, 1998
  • 21. “Mythic Hybrid,” Prema Murthy, 2002
  • 22. “Mythic Hybrid,” Prema Murthy, 2002
  • 23. Lynn Hershman Leeson
  • 24. Lynn Hershman Leeson – performance
  • 25. “Dante Hotel,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, 1972.
  • 26. “Roberta’s Construction Chart #1,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, 1974.
  • 27. “Roberta Meeting Blaine,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, 1975.
  • 28. Lynn Hershman Leeson – performance – interactive media
  • 29. “Lorna,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, interactive artwork, 1979-1984.
  • 30. “Lorna,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, interactive artwork, 1979-1984.
  • 31. “Deep Contact: The First Interactive Sexual Fantasy Videodisc,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, interactive artwork, 1979-1984.
  • 32. “A Room of One’s Own (Echo Narcissus),” Lynn Hershman Leeson, interactive artwork, 1990-1993.
  • 33. “This device, an alliance between the phonograph and thephotograph, was designed so that a single spectator could peepthrough an eyehole and see film loops. Known as the peep show,spectators took pleasure in the process of voyeuristically viewingseductive images of women.The gun/camera has had a direct relationship not only on thishistory of film and the eroticization of female imagery inphotography and phonography, but also in pornography.Women are taught to be looked at. In contemporary society thisis interpreted as a manifestation of desire. Yet such objectifyingobservation triggers ideas of ownership and consumption. So withthe association of gun to camera to trigger, the representation ofwomen is linked quite literally to lethal weapons.If cinema is a social technology, then the captivity of woman assubject and subject-victim through this medium situates womeninto precoded identities. Their submissive position is implicatedinto the construction of fantasy, and is positioned (ob)scenely….”
  • 34. Lynn Hershman Leeson – performance – interactive media – photography
  • 35. “Phantom Limb Photographs,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, 1980- 1990.
  • 36. Lynn Hershman Leeson – performance – interactive media – photography – video
  • 37. Lynn Hershman Leeson – performance – interactive media – photography – video – feature films
  • 38. “Binge,” part 2 of a 3-part series titled “Electronic Diary,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, video, 1987.
  • 39. “Desire Inc.,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, video, 1990.
  • 40. “Seduction of a Cyborg,” Lynn Hershman Leeson, video, 1994.

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