Means, Messaging and Media

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For a seminar I did in Belize for non-profits.

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Means, Messaging and Media

  1. 1. NATIONAL COMMITTEE FORFAMILIES AND CHILDRENIEC COMMUNICATION TRAINING SEMINARUniversity of the West Indies Open Campus, BelizeSept. 25-28, 2012MEANS, MESSAGING AND MEDIABY HOLLY EDGELL
  2. 2. THE MASS MEDIA INBELIZEWhat do we mean when we say, “the media?”• Television• Radio• Newspaper• The Internet Social Media Blogs
  3. 3. THE MASS MEDIA INBELIZEWhat do we mean by “journalism?”• News and information about • People & Society • Politics/government • Culture • Business • The Economy • Public service • Environment • Weather • Education
  4. 4. BELIZE & INFORMATIONFrom Research Report Series Communication for Development Study: ACulture of Rights (UNICEF Belize, 2011)
  5. 5. BELIZE &INFORMATIONFrom Research Report Series Communication for DevelopmentStudy: A Culture of Rights (UNICEF Belize, 2011)
  6. 6. BELIZE &INFORMATIONFrom Research Report Series Communication for Development Study: ACulture of Rights (UNICEF Belize, 2011)
  7. 7. BELIZE &INFORMATIONMore respondents watched Channel 5 (79.5%) than any otherlocal channel.Channel 7 was also watched by many respondents(61.3%, n=245).Other television stations watched included:• Plus TV (4.8%)• LoveTV (4.3%)• PGTV (3.8%)• Channel 53 (n=3.3%)• KremTV (2.8%)From Research Report Series Communication for Development Study: ACulture of Rights (UNICEF Belize, 2011)
  8. 8. MEDIA COVERAGEWhat do journalists find “newsworthy?”
  9. 9. NEWS “VALUES”Impact: The significance, importance, or consequenceof an event or trend; the greater the consequence, andthe larger the number of people for whom an event isimportant the greater the newsworthiness.Timeliness: The more recent, the more newsworthy.In some cases, timeliness is relative. An event mayhave occurred in the past but only have been learnedabout recently.Prominence: Occurrences featuring well-knownindividuals or institutions are newsworthy.
  10. 10. NEWS “VALUES”Proximity: Closeness of the occurrence tot heaudience may be gauged either geographically or interms of the assumed values, interest andexpectations of the news audience.The Bizarre: The unusual, unorthodox, or unexpectedattracts attention.Conflict: Controversy and open clashes arenewsworthy, inviting attention on their own, almostregardless of what the conflict is over.
  11. 11. NEWS “VALUES”Currency: Occasionally something becomes an ideawhose time has come. The matter assumes a life of itsown, and for a time assumes momentum in newsreportage.Human Interest: Those stories that have more of anentertainment factor versus any of the above - not thatsome of the other news values cannot have anentertainment value.
  12. 12. WHERE DO YOURMESSAGES FIT IN?ImpactTimelinessProminenceProximityThe BizarreConflict & ControversyCurrencyHuman Interest
  13. 13. GETTING COVERAGE4 questions to ask yourself:• What else is happening? • Plan ahead to avoid other “big news”• Is there a news “hook?” • Something that draws the reader in. The hook is what makes the story relevant right now.• What information and resources can you provide? • Data, interviews, a “real person” • WHO WHAT WHEN WHERE WHY HOW• What is the best media platform? • Who do you know?
  14. 14. GETTING COVERAGEIdeas to consider for IEC• Consult and collaborate, seek advice & help• Create a central calendar • Special days, weeks, holidays, commemorations• Monitor news events and craft media “pitches” accordingly • Example: A bad case of child abuse reported. Provide media with statistics, an expert to interview to give context, information for viewers, listeners and readers to report child abuse and find help• Regular “tip sheet” email to media with data, information • Monthly, weekly?

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