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Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
Causativeverbs
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Causativeverbs

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  1. Exceptional Verbs(Verbs which are not followed by gerunds or infinitives) Created by Holly Cin
  2. Causative Verbs “Causative verbs” are used to express the idea that X causes Y to do something. Causative verbs are have, get, and make. Passive causative means that I cause something to get done by somebody else.
  3. Make + object (followed by the simple verb) If I make you do something, I make you do it by force or by compulsion. You’ll do it, but it will be done against your will. For example, in class today, I made Rayan give me his money when I pointed the gun at him. He had no choice. He did it against his will. We have an expression in English that goes, “The devil made me do it.” In other words, its not my fault because I had no choice. (I didn’t want to eat that cake but the devil made me do it!) Mothers often make their children eat vegetables. Musical Lesson: "I Cant Make You Love Me If You Dont," by Bonnie Raitt http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nW9Cu6GYqxo This is a song about unrequited love. So sad!
  4. Have + object (followed by the simple verb) If I have you do something for me, it means I have asked you to do something for me.Example: I had a leak in my bathroom, so I called the plumber, and I had him fix the leak.Example: I was very thirsty when I came home so I asked my son to bring me a glass of water. In other words, I had him bring me a glass of water. In other words, I caused him to get me the water.
  5. Get + object (followed by the infinitive) If I get you to do something, I convince, pursuade, or “encourage” you to do something that you didnt want to do willingly at first. Example: Many of the students did not want to make gerund slides for me, but I got them to do it by reminding them about letters of recommendation which they might need from me one day.Sometimes I get my children to help me with things by offering them rewards (in other words, by bribing them).Musical Lesson:
  6. Passive Causative: Have or get + object (followed by the past participle) Example: I had my house painted (by the painter). I paid the painter which caused him to do the work for me. He agreed to do the work. Other examples:I had my nails done (by the manicurist). I had my hair cut (by the barber or the beautician). I got my car repaired (by the mechanic). You have to get your computer fixed (by the guy who fixes the computers).
  7. Other “exceptional” verbs Let and help Verbs of Perception
  8. Let + object (followed by the simple verb) The lesson to learn here is that the simple verb follows "let,” as in “let’s go,” “let’s eat,” or “let me help you.” Musical Lesson: "Dont Let the Sun Go Down On Me," by Elton John http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI5xme5k5AQ “If You Love Me, Let Me Know,” by Olivia Newton John http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnG6i7DWV7M
  9. Help + object (followed by the infinitive or by the simple verb) He helped me do my homework. He helped me to do my homework.Both are equally correct.Can you help him open the door?Can you help him to open the door?Again, both are equally correct.Musical Lesson:“Help Me, Rhonda,” by the Beach Boyshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81BjS3k_FZ8What does the singer want Rhonda to help him (to) do?
  10. Verbs of Perception, part 1 Certain verbs of perception are followed by either the simple verb or the gerund. These verbs are see, notice, watch, look at, observe, hear, listen to, feel, and smell Both of the following sentences are correct and their meaning is similar, but not the same: 1. I heard the rain fall on the roof. 2. I heard the rain falling on the roof.So what’s the difference? The gerund form suggests that the event was in progress; it emphasizes the idea of “while.” In other words, I heard the rain while it was falling on the roof. However, there really is NOT a big difference here between the two sentences.
  11. Verbs of Perception, part 2: When there is a difference However, sometimes there is a clear difference between using the simple verb and the gerund after a verb of perception. The use of the gerund gives the idea that an activity is already in progress at the point of perception. Example 1: When I entered my apartment, I heard my roommate singing in the shower.When I heard her, the singing was already in progress. Example 2: Last night, I heard Mariah Carey sing.This means that I heard the singing from beginning to end—the entire concert. It was not in progress when I first heard it.

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