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7 Easy Steps to Successful Meetings

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  • 1. ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 2. IntroductionMeetings  are  the  cornerstones  for  consistency  in  your  practice.  Team  meetings  are  essential  in  order  to:     • Follow  up  on  old  business   • Discuss  changes  &  new  systems   • Implement  training,  try  new  techniques  or  materials   • Assign  projects  and  work  on  projects   • Make  superior  decisions  as  a  group  We  often  hear  team  meetings  have  been  boring,  or  non-­‐productive,  or  gripe  sessions,  or  they  stress  the  Doctor  out  because  they  don’t  have  time  to  prepare.  It  can  be  different!    It  means  that  team  members  must  be  involved.  Encourage  team  members  to  be  in  charge  of  the  meetings  and  responsible  for  making  change  happen.  Hold  them  accountable  for  results.  It  won’t  be  different  unless  you  try  something  different!       “The  definition  of  insanity  is  doing  the  same  thing  over  and  over  again  and  expecting  different  results!”   Albert  Einstein  In this guide you will learn: • Tips  for  building  your  agenda   • When  to  have  meetings  and  how  long  they  should  be   • What  the  Facilitator’s  role  encompasses     • What  the  Recorder  is  responsible  for   • Tools  to  use  to  guarantee  your  meetings  end  with  a  plan  for  action     ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 3. Step 1. It All Starts In Your HuddleKeep  a  team  meeting  agenda  handy  at  every  huddle.  Whenever  something  comes  up  that  needs  further  discussion  and  is  not  part  of  your  huddle  checklist,  put  the  topic  on  your  team  meeting  agenda.  Pretty  soon  your  agenda  will  fill  up  with  lots  of  relevant  topics  that  need  to  be  addressed  &  resolved.    Keep  your  team  meeting  agenda  posted  in  a  central  area  so  that  everyone  can  add  relevant  topics  to  it.  If  you  want  change  in  your  office,  it’s  up  to  you  and  each  person  on  your  team!    Practices  made  up  of  team  members  that  are  not  fearful  of  bringing  up  tough  subjects  are  ultimately  more  successful  and  better  places  to  work!      Step 2. Help Your Meetings Be SuccessfulDon’t  serve  food  at  meetings  (ok,  occasionally,  if  it’s  a  birthday  or  a  practice  celebration).  Don’t  have  meetings  while  eating  lunch.    Focus  on  the  business  of  making  your  practice  the  best  place  to  work  and  the  best  place  for  patients  to  receive  care.    Eat  before  or  after  the  meeting,  it  is  a  distraction.  We  recommend  scheduling  meetings  in  difficult  to  fill  patient  times  and  when  the  most  team  members  can  be  present.    If  you  are  a  part-­‐time  employee  and  not  present  for  the  meeting,  you  are  still  responsible  for  the  information  discussed  at  the  meetings  and  for  implementing  the  changes  agreed  to  at  the  meetings.   ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 4. Step 3. Have Them!Start  with  1-­‐hour  meetings  every  month.  Eventually,  you’ll  have  so  much  to  discuss  that  you’ll  need  weekly  meetings.      Don’t  worry  about  taking  so  much  time  out  of  production  time  for  meetings,  huddles  &  administrative  time.  Offices  that  have  regular  meetings,  huddles  &  administrative  time  increase  production  up  to  25%.  By  taking  the  time  out  of  your  schedule,  you’ll  be  able  to  make  your  schedule  more  effective.  Customer  service  will  be  better,  the  schedule  will  run  better  &  you’ll  be  happier,  too.    It’s  just  like  going  to  the  grocery  store  with  a  list  or  without.  You  come  home  with  food  either  way,  but  which  works  better?  Step 4. Be Organized • Assign  a  Facilitator     • Assign  a  Recorder   • Start  on  time  &  end  on  time   • Stay  on  track  with  your  agenda  as  the  guide    The  Facilitator  is  the  coach.  She/He  will  keep  the  meeting  on  time,  make  sure  you  stay  on  topic  &  make  sure  that  all  team  members  participate.  The  Recorder  takes  simple,  brief  notes  that  will  serve  to  document  what  was  covered  and  the  To-­‐Do  List  that  resulted.    Start  a  Meetings  notebook.  After  each  meeting,  put  the  notes  &  the  team  meeting  agenda  &  the  To  Do  list  in  your  notebook  filed  by  date.   ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 5. Step 5. Be PreparedEveryone  should  have  a  copy  of  the  agenda  &  be  ready  to  present  any  items  they  placed  on  the  agenda.    Trust  plays  a  role  in  whether  your  team  members  are  prepared.    Without  preparation  you  will  not  have  a  productive  meeting.    It  is  essential  for  you  to  be  willing  to  risk  trusting  others  and  their  ideas  for  them  to  want  to  be  prepared.    You  must  believe  your  team  members  are  competent  and  share  your  values  and  vision  to  accept  their  ideas.    Show  your  commitment  to  your  values  and  vision  for  your  practice  and  your  team,  by  always  being  prepared  yourself  and  holding  everyone  equally  to  the  practice  standards.        Step 6. Participate!If  you  want  change  to  happen  in  your  office,  then  be  ready  to  present  your  ideas  and  opinions  in  a  professional,  non-­‐blameful  way.  Remember:  it’s  about  change.  Negotiating  change  means  being  willing  to  hear  someone  else’s  viewpoint.    Your  viewpoint  is  no  more  or  no  less  important  than  another  team  member’s  viewpoint.  An  invested  and  involved  team  is  the  key  to  a  practice’s  success.    Respected,  valued,  competent  team  members  will  participate  without  hesitation.    Have  the  courage  to  pull  a  team  member  aside,  in  a  non-­‐public  place,  after  the  meeting  if  you  feel  they  were  not  prepared  or  did  not  participate.    You  could  say  something  like;  “It’s  really  important  to  me  to  have  your  viewpoint  as  a  member  of  the  team.    I  get   disappointed  when  you  don’t  participate.    What  would  you  be  willing  to  do  at  our  next   meeting  to  show  a  higher  level  of  commitment  to  the  team?”    PAUSE,  let  the  team  member   answer!  “What  can  I  do  to  help  make  that  happen?”         Step 7. End with an Action Plan What  are  you  going  to  do  differently  to  solve  the  issues  the  practice  faces?    Coming  up   with  solutions  that  support  a  better  work  environment  or  a  better  patient  experience  is   the  goal  of  meeting.  Try  something  different!!  If  all  you  do  is  discuss,  eventually  you  will   decide  that  meetings  are  a  waste  of  time.     ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 6. The Facilitator’s Role is Key!Nine Techniques to Triumph over Bad, Boring Meetings 1. Ensure  everyone  knows  the  start  and  stop  time  of  the  meeting.    Doctors  must   show  commitment  to  team  communication  by  not  working  into  the  meeting  time.     Meetings  will  improve  the  practice  if  everyone  is  committed  to  participating  in  an   effective  meeting  that  produces  real  results.   2. The  Facilitator’s  duty  is  to  keep  everything  and  everyone  on  track  and  on   schedule.    Do  not  start  your  patients  late  as  a  result  of  your  meeting  running  over.     3. The  Facilitator’s  goal  is  to  encourage  discussion  and  draw  people  out.    Make  sure   the  same  people  on  your  team  don’t  do  all  the  talking.    If  someone  is  not   participating  or  involved  in  the  discussion  ask  directly  for  his  or  her  input.   “Sharon,  what  do  you  think?”   “Mike,  what  could  you  add?”   “Jane,  how  do  you  feel  about  this?”   4. Meet  with  the  doctor  the  day  before  the  meeting  to  review  the  agenda  and  to  agree  on  what  can  be  covered  in  the  time   available.  Determine  the  objective  of  the  meeting.    If  the  facilitator  knows  the  “burning  issue”  the  practice  is  looking  to   solve,  (i.e.  Doctors  checking  hygiene  patients  at  the  end  of  the  visit  instead  of  earlier,  causing  the  hygienists  to  run   behind)  they  will  be  better  at  keeping  everyone  on  task.    Determine  what  problem  must  have  a  solution  at  the  end  of   today’s  meeting.  Know  the  time  limits  for  each  agenda  item.  To  allow  for  adequate  discussion,  do  not  be  afraid  to  table   some  items  to  a  future  meeting,     ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 7. 5. If  it  is  your  turn  to  be  facilitator  and  you  are  passionate  about  an  item  on  the  agenda,  have  a  back  up  to  facilitate  that   topic  and  keep  the  meeting  on  schedule.    Remember  your  goal  is  not  just  to  discuss,  you  must  allow  enough  time  to   action  plan.    Action  planning  means  being  specific  about  what  you  are  requesting  that  others  do  differently.   6. To  start  your  meeting,  review  the  Action  Plan  from  the  last  meeting  in  the  meeting  notebook.  Check  to  see  that  everyone   is  ready  with  his  or  her  follow  up  information.  Ask  what  progress  has  been  made  and  what  roadblocks  are  in  the  way?   7. Keep  everyone  on  track!  If  the  meeting  gets  off  topic,  say:   “We’ve  gotten  off  topic.  Let’s  get  back  to  the  original  issue  &  I’ll  place  this  one  on  the  next  agenda.”   8. Watch  the  time!  End  the  meeting  on  time.  It  shows  professionalism  and  respect  for  your  patients.    If  time  is  running  out,   make  the  call  and  tell  the  group:   “We  need  to  stop  now  and  action  plan  for  our  last  10  minutes.”   9. Make  sure  the  Action  Plan  gets  completed  and  tasks  are  assigned.  Who  is  promising  to  do  what,  by  when.  Without   specifics,  accountability  is  non-­‐existent.    It’s  the  Facilitator’s  job  to  make  sure  progress  happens  from  one  meeting  to  the   next  by  holding  others  accountable  for  their  promises  (see  Step  6).    Involvement  in  projects  must  be  spread  evenly   throughout  the  team.    If  one  person  or  one  group  is  involved  in  every  project,  the  team  dynamic  suffers  and  synergy  is   lost.               ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 8. TEAM MEETING AGENDAMeeting Date _____________ Facilitator ________________ Recorder ________________ Topic for discussion Time Needed Suggested by1.2.3.4.5.6.7.File in Meetings Notebook ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 9. TEAM MEETING FOLLOW UP Today’s Date _____________________ Next Meeting Date Next Facilitator _____________________ Next Recorder ACTION PLAN AS A RESULT OF TODAY’S MEETING Activity Who By When1.2.3.4.5.6.7.File in Meetings Notebook ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 10. In ConclusionHolding  meetings  takes  time  away  from  patient  care,  but  the  time  invested  will  make  for  better,  more  profitable  patient  care  in  the  future.  A  dictionary  defines  meetings  as  an  act  or  process  of  coming  together  as  an  assembly  for  a  common  purpose.  The  dictionary  did  not  say  it  was  a  chance  encounter,  a  party  with  friends,  or  random  gathering  of  people.    The  raison  d’être  for  meetings  is  to  clarify  common  goals  and  reach  an  end  result  via  superior  decisions.    Design  your  meetings  to  create  a  better  environment  to  work  in  or  a  better  experience  for  your  patients.    When  everyone  is  onboard  and  striving  toward  the  same  goals,  the  results  are  spectacular.  Use  meetings  to  help  create  the  team  environment  you  are  striving  for;  it  takes  a  team  to  have  a  successful  practice.      By  reading  this  guide  you  are  equipped  with  the  resources  and  tools  to  hold  your  own  successful  meetings!    Meetings  are  the  cornerstones  for  creating  consistency  in  your  practice.    Get  started  now!     ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 11. About the Authors We  are  six  practice  development  specialists,  each  with  over  25  years  of   experience  guiding  thousands  of  healthcare  businesses  like  yours  to   develop  the  mindsets,  skills,  and  behaviors  that  prepare  you  to  face  and   meet  any  challenge  in  your  business.       We  are  passionately  dedicated  to  educating  practice  leaders  about  the   fundamental  impact  the  right  organizational  culture  has  on  your  team   and  your  patients.       Our  Faculty  offers  you  support  and   experience,  along  with  revolutionary   education,  tools,  and  coaching  to  help  you   build  a  practice  of  achievement,  loyalty,   enthusiasm,  and  stability.      A  practice  where  Culture  Rules™.           ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175  
  • 12.  About Culture Rules™We  believe  culture  evolves  and  exists  as  a  result  of  core  values  and  sound  principles.  It  is  how  we  think,  communicate,  perform  and  thrive.  Your  culture  is  the  heartbeat  of  your  practice.  When  lived,  demonstrated,  experienced,  and  shared  consistently,  your  culture  elevates  your  practice  and  your  life.  Culture Rules™ implies two things: • Your  culture  isn’t  random.    It’s  a  deliberate  atmosphere  shaped  by  values  and  principles  that  govern  your  business.       • Your  practice’s  values  and  principles  aren’t  optional.    They’re  the  rules  that  guide  your  team  and  your  decisions  on  a   daily  basis.       Culture  Rules’™  9  Cs  of  Culture  offer  you  usable  strategies  to  establish  or  amend  your   practice’s  culture.    So  whether  your  practice  is  in  a  state  of  chaos  with  the  practice  running   the  doctor,  or  you’re  moving  toward  organization  and  communication,  or  you  already   possess  a  clear  vision  and  business  plan,  Culture  Rules™  can  keep  you  heading  in  the  right   direction,  so  you’ll  always  have  a  Culture  that  Rules.   To  see  how  Culture  Rules™  can  impact  your  practice,  or  for  help  transforming  your  practice   into  a  Culture  that  Rules,  contact  us  at  customercare@culturerules.com.     For  more  tools  and  resources  to  create  a  culture  of  achievement,  loyalty,  enthusiasm  and   stability  go  to  http://culturerules.com™.         ©  2012  International  Institute  for  Healthcare  Businesses,  LLC.      |        (800)  404-­‐5175