Gender Tutorial

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This tutorial should be completed by ARC students enrolled in my online Psyc 300 class at American River College and corresponds with Module C Lesson 2.

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  • On Slide 11 there is a broken hyperlink. 'Do the toys we buy children matter?' Here is the link for this article: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/explananda/201208/explaining-gender-differences
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Gender Tutorial

  1. 1. Learning Gender Created by: Professor Hokerson American River College Last Updated: Fall 2015 Module C Lesson 2 Tutorial
  2. 2. Using this Tutorial  Use the navigation buttons at the bottom of the screen.  Click on hyperlinks when prompted.  Have fun and learn!
  3. 3. Table of Contents (TOC)  Objectives ◦ Module Objectives #18 - 20  Action Items  Definitions  Gender  Gender Differences  Gender Role Learning  Defining Masculinity  Conclusions
  4. 4. MODULE C OBJECTIVES By the end of this tutorial you will be able to… #18 – Report two important qualifications to consider when studying gender differences. #19– Summarize gender differences in personality, emotionality, cognition, and sexual attitudes and behaviors. #20 - Describe gender role acquisition from childhood through adulthood, using social learning, gender schemas evolutionary, and interactionist theories.
  5. 5. ACTION ITEMS
  6. 6. Defining Sex  Question: Are these the same thing?  Read: “Introduction: Gender and Sexuality,” Chapter 10 pages 400 – 401  Although the terms are used interchangeably, they in fact are different. Sex is biological. Gender is a social construct.  Although we tend to view sex as a gender binary there is growing evidence that the biology of sex might be more complex than that.
  7. 7. Gender Cross-Culturally  Read: Gender Stereotypes and Gender Roles, Chapter 10 pages 401 – 407.  Question: If gender were entirely socially constructed, how can the results from Williams and Best’s research studies find a “high degree of agreement on the characteristics associated with each sex” across 25 different cultures? (Hockenbury and Hockenbury, 2013, p.402).
  8. 8. Gender Identity  Activity: Complete the Gender I.D. Quiz. ◦ What gender do your characteristics most resemble? You are born with your biological sex, which includes your genetic sex and your anatomical sex. Your culture defines what it means to be male or female, that is your gender. How you identify is called your gender identity. For most people their genetic sex will match their assigned sex, which will also match their gender identity. But what if you took a test and found out that the characteristics that make you unique are actually descriptive of the “other” sex?
  9. 9. Battle of the Sexes There is a growing body of research which substantiates that men and women do have different characteristics and/or tendencies. What these studies don’t do, however, is explain why. Is it because men and women are born different or are we raised to develop differently? And do these differences equate to deficiencies?
  10. 10. Gender Differences  Read: “Gender-Related Differences” and “Gender Differences: Women in Science” in Chapter 10, pages 402 – 407.  Summarize: How are men and women different in personality, emotionality, cognition, sexual attitudes and behaviors?  The New Sex Scorecard which offers some other examples of these differences, but explains them in the context of biological causes and discussed their effects.  Activity: After reading the article “The New Sex Scorecard” how are men and women different? Complete the Gender Differences Quizlet and Section A of the Gender Worksheet.
  11. 11. Gender Role Learning  Question: Where do these differences come from?  Reflection: Although there may be some biological differences in men and women, can you absolutely conclude that these differences are innate? In other words how do you know if boys and girls are born with these differences or if they are nurtured from their environments?  Read: “Gender-Role Development” in Chapter 10, pages 408 – 413.  Do the toys we buy children matter? This article explores the effect of how we explain gender roles, according to Psychology Today.  Activity: Complete section B of the Gender Worksheet.
  12. 12. Social Learning Theory  Question: At what age do we begin to learn gender?  Reflection: As you recall on page 408 that children as young as age 2 and 3 identify themselves by gender, however it is very concrete (hair length, color of clothing). They have not yet developed concrete operational thought yet!  Watch: From a very young age children are bombarded with advertising that sends a very clear message, to children, about what it means to be male or female, as demonstrated in this Gender in Advertising video.  Activity: Complete Part C of the Gender Worksheet.
  13. 13. Defining Masculinity  Reflection: Which gender is more desirable? Which is more nurturing? Although the characteristics of masculinity are more likely to be equated with success than are the characteristics of femininity, cultural gender roles aren’t changing but men are!  How do men respond to the demands of their gender today? Here is an article titled Fatherhood 2.0 that examines this new plight of men!
  14. 14. Conclusions  Sometimes men and women are different. ◦ These differences do not mean deficiency or superiority. ◦ These differences are averages, not absolute.  Understanding the origins of gender differences is difficult. ◦ Most researchers agree that it these differences are most likely a combination of both nature and nurture.  Men and women are more similar than different.
  15. 15. MODULE C OBJECTIVES By the end of this tutorial you should now be able to… #18 – Report two important qualifications to consider when studying gender differences. #19– Summarize gender differences in personality, emotionality, cognition, and sexual attitudes and behaviors. #20 - Describe gender role acquisition from childhood through adulthood, using social learning, gender schemas evolutionary, and interactionist theories.

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