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Care home crisis

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In a world where we are cutting back. Frontline services are being lost leaving the most vulnerable members of our society in danger of being neglected. This presentation raises awareness of planned …

In a world where we are cutting back. Frontline services are being lost leaving the most vulnerable members of our society in danger of being neglected. This presentation raises awareness of planned closures in Hampshire UK and highlights the implications.


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  • To make you aware ofthe potential closure of key care homes and day centres for disabled adults in Hampshire and the possible impact this could have on service usersTo make you think about the consequences of these actions on the individuals and for our society for the long term.
  • ■ Croft House, Fareham, - to close■ Dalewood, Basingstoke – to merge■ Fernmount House, New Milton – to relocate■ Highfield House, Eastleigh – to merge■ Homewood House, Andover - stay open■ Meadow Croft House, Aldershot – to close■ Orchard Close, Hayling Island – stay open■ Upton Grey (Harestock Hostel), Winchester – to close■ West Street, Havant – stay openDespite repeated pledges to protect frontline services social services bosses now want to close three homes, merge two and relocate one, cutting the total number from nine to five. They are also planning to slash the number of day centres from 12 to four.
  • Fully equipped environments with specialist facilitiesFully trained, friendly staff with a network of specialists to helpA safe and familiar environment for the most vulnerable people in societyAccess to a network of friends and families in a shared communityHelen and Rod89 year old Helen cared for her son Rod with Down Syndrome until he was 48. She sadly passed away when he was 49. Day service, respite and emergency care from Croft House were essential in enabling Helen to look after Rod. Without this support she couldn’t have coped and he would have gone into care, especially after she suffered a stroke and a broken hip.ClaireA disabled mother from Manchester has three children, one of whom is severely autistic, "I've been trying to get care workers to come to my home for two hours a day so that I can cook my other children tea without having to keep an eye on my son. All I've been offered so far is three hours a month. It's exhausting."
  • For elderly people, the figures are well rehearsed: a doubling of the number of over-85s by 2026, with 300,000 more needing care over the next four years aloneunprotected spending areas] would come at a time when we know we are likely to see 370,000 more people needing care and support – an effective growth in demand of some 4% a year, creating a potential challenge of up to 40% for many councils," said Richard Jones, Adass president. According to the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (Adass), the ageing population and growing numbers of people with learning disabilities mean that spending needs a 4% boost annually, over and above inflation, just to keep pace with demand.At the heart of the debate is the funding available for respite – allotted time, sometimes as little as a few hours a week, where care workers look after disabled children to give their parents a break. The Government has set aside £800m over the next four years for care packages but the money is not ring-fenced, meaning local authorities can use it if they need to plug holes in their budgets elsewhere.
  • "A reduction of 25% in our budgets over three years [the rule-of-thumb for unprotected spending areas] would come at a time when we know we are likely to see 370,000 more people needing care and support – an effective growth in demand of some 4% a year, creating a potential challenge of up to 40% for many councils," said Richard Jones, Adass president.At the heart of the debate is the funding available for respite – allotted time, sometimes as little as a few hours a week, where care workers look after disabled children to give their parents a break. The Government has set aside £800m over the next four years for care packages but the money is not ring-fenced, meaning local authorities can use it if they need to plug holes in their budgets elsewhere.
  • For elderly people, the figures are well rehearsed: a doubling of the number of over-85s by 2026, with 300,000 more needing care over the next four years aloneunprotected spending areas] would come at a time when we know we are likely to see 370,000 more people needing care and support – an effective growth in demand of some 4% a year, creating a potential challenge of up to 40% for many councils," said Richard Jones, Adass president. According to the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (Adass), the ageing population and growing numbers of people with learning disabilities mean that spending needs a 4% boost annually, over and above inflation, just to keep pace with demand.At the heart of the debate is the funding available for respite – allotted time, sometimes as little as a few hours a week, where care workers look after disabled children to give their parents a break. The Government has set aside £800m over the next four years for care packages but the money is not ring-fenced, meaning local authorities can use it if they need to plug holes in their budgets elsewhere.
  • Transcript

    • 1. “A moral test of society is how it treats its most vulnerable members.”
      Get to the Point!
      In the grip of recession .
      Are we in danger of letting
      down the most vulnerable
      people in our society?
    • 2. The Issue
      Respite Care Home in
      Fareham is 1 of 4 to close
      Current Service
      • 99 respite beds
      • 3. 26 long stay residents
      • 4. 423 people with planned respite
      • 5. 835 learning disabled people attend the day centres
    • What they say
      Proposed changes
      Councillor Felicity Hindson, executive member for adult social care, is expected to approve a 14-week public consultation before any final decisions are made on April 29.
      Cllr Hindson said: “There will be no reduction in the amount of services available”
      ■ Croft House, Fareham, - to close■ Dalewood, Basingstoke – to merge■ Fernmount House, New Milton – to relocate■ Highfield House, Eastleigh – to merge■ Homewood House, Andover - stay open■ Meadow Croft House, Aldershot – to close■ Orchard Close, Hayling Island – stay open■ (Harestock Hostel), Winchester – to close■ West Street, Havant – stay open
      Number of day centres to go from 12 to 4
      “all departments will have to cut their budgets by eight per cent in 2010-11 but frontline child protection and adult social care will be protected.”
      Cllr Thornberat a meeting of the council’s controlling cabinet, October 2010
    • 6. Proposed benefits of closing care facilities
      £6m in estimated future costs will be saved if care homes and day centres are closed.
      Personal assistants could be employed to help people get out rather than go to a day centre
      Short breaks can be provided more cheaply by the independent sector.
      Managers will consult to help families find alternatives
      Respite will be prioritised for those that really need it
      It is believed the service will not reduce or decline?
      These houses have been chosen because the demand for respite has declined? – This is possibly due to a change in policy whereby respite has been rationed for those that really need it.
    • 7. What is at risk?
      Fully equipped environments with specialist facilities
      Fully trained, friendly staff with a network of specialists to help
      A safe and familiar environment for the most vulnerable people in society
      Access to a network of friends and families in a shared community
      - Reduced access to respite could lead to carers being unable to look after their children.
      - Skilled and friendly professionals will be lost.
      Vulnerable people don’t understand and it will seem like a punishment to them if they can’t go to their day centre anymore.”
      - This could isolate more people in their own homes.
      Mrs Jessop
      Chairperson - Winchester Mencap
      and Mother to son of 25 with Down Syndrome
    • 8. Question
      There will be a doubling of the number of over-85s by 2026, with 300,000 more needing care over the next four years alone.
      Are we looking at a short term fix that will create a long term problem?
    • 9. Question
      Thanks largely to the increasing longevity of learning-disabled adults, there will be a sharp rise in the number of younger people with care needs: 70,000 more people of working age will need care by 2014
      Are we in danger of isolating the most vulnerable people in society?
    • 10. Why Should I care?
      Meet Helen and Rod
      Meet my son Max – he is 11 years old and has Down Syndrome
      89 year old Helen cared for her son Rod with Down Syndrome until he was 48. She sadly passed away when he was 49. Day service, respite and emergency care from Croft House were essential in enabling Helen to look after Rod. Without this support she couldn’t have coped for as long as she did.
      What will happen to him in
      40 years?
    • 11. Question
      Where will you be in 40 years time?
      What about your children?
    • 12. What can you do?
      Help raise awareness
      • Not many people are aware that this is happening
      • 13. A number of carers being consulted are elderly and don’t know who to turn to for help
      • 14. Help those who can’t help themselves
      • 15. You can help by raising awareness
      Pledge your support
      Pledge your support and vote against the closure by joining our petition.
      www.ipetitions.com/petition/croft.house/
      Follow the campaign at
      www.whocareswecare.org.uk

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