Live health live well workplace wellness programs priester

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  • Learn about Extension developed research based workplace programs to encourage healthy lifestyles.Discuss ways to develop new or strengthen existing partnerships between Extension health educators and community organizations or businesses.Explore avenues to empower individuals and communities to make informed choices regarding healthy behaviors guided by research based information.Increase awareness of using social media tools (such as blog, Facebook, or email) to reach busy adults with nutrition, fitness, and wellness information.
  • Talk about Team of Educators, divided into sub groups working on specific projects.
  • In 2006, discussion began with the County Commissioners Association of Ohio wellness coordinator and Ohio State University Extension concerning options for meeting the health needs of county employees. The Commissioners’ Association was interested in reducing health care costs in the counties. Several counties had formed a group self- insurance program and other counties were interested in lowering health care costs and having healthier, more productive employees.As a result of this partnership, OSU Extension developed an on-line health needs assessment questionnaire. The surveys results led to development of lessons for lunch and learn workshops. Lessons were developed by Educators and peer reviewed through FCS Administrative process with Out of State reviewers.
  • Go to the link and share blog. Writers submit articles for peer-review.Blog is updated 2 times a week. Received an award as the First Place OSU Extension Blog in 2011.
  • Had about 5,000 views in 2011, already have over 20,000 views in 2012, already 10,000 views in 2013.Average views per day in 2011 – 13Average view per day in 2012 - 55
  • Over 600 followers on Facebook (100 new likes since the first of the year) – post almost every week day – sometimes 2 times a day. Posts typically viewed by 150 – 230 people.Find us through google, bing, and blog page.United Kingdom, Italy, Dominican Republic, Nigera, Finland.
  • Facebook page was started in September 2011.
  • Themes include – Whole grains, more veg & fruits, more water, less caffeine and soda, cut out fast food, dairy 3 a day, eat breakfast every day, portion sizes, etcIncentives have included small fitness equipment, cookbooks, things to encourage lunch packing, go green shopping bags, walking lights, veggie brushes, Subway cards, etc. Received a grant from NEAFCS to give out Living Well More than a Cookbook books in this Fall Challenge.
  • Stages of change
  • 97% of participants completing lesson evaluations indicated they learned new information. The same percent (97) indicated they plan to use something they learned. Lesson evaluation was amended in 2013. Major changes were to match OSU federal and state reporting system. This system asks “participants learn new information” and “plan to make a change based on information learned”
  • The method of teaching did not significantly change the audience. Lessons-93% female; wellness challenge 91% female. Lessons 94% White; Wellness challenge 94% whiteThis page also shows how evaluation can look different depending on how it is charted. Both charts indicate same information. However, chart on the left does NOT start from a point of zero. Thus it appears that there is a BIG change in number of women participating when in actuality there was only a 2% change. Lesson learned- type of chart makes a difference.
  • Another way to viewsame information
  • This evaluation was also amended. Most evaluation changes were about frequency. For example instead of indicating “always, frequently or occasionally” participants now indicate “everyday, 4 or more times per week, 2-3 times per week, 1 time per week or less”. 365 participants completed presurvey. 93. % female, 94% white, 32% 45-54 years old. 27% were 55-64 years old. This means 59% of participants are in the age range of 45-64….baby boomers? Last challenge ___completed presurvey. What does this chart show? What areas should focus on teaching?
  • What do you think of participants’ indicators? What topics should be emphasized in teaching?
  • This may be a little more difficult to interpret. Why? The indicators above are negative health behaviors. The lower frequency and higher percentage is actually the best health indicator. What does this mean in terms of teaching materials to develop?
  • In addition to healthy eating habits, there are other habits and indicators that effect our wellness. What do the these wellness indicators imply?
  • Do positive habits change negative habits? Can a negative behavior influence a positive behavior? Ideas? What would you like to see?

Transcript

  • 1. EMPOWERMENT THROUGH EDUCATIONFamily & Consumer SciencesHealthy People | Healthy Relationships | Healthy FinancesLive Healthy LiveWell WorkplaceWellness ProgramsPresenters:Cindy Bond, Extension Educator, Community DevelopmentLinnette Goard, Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management,Family & Consumer SciencesOhio State University Extension
  • 2. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sToday’s Topics:• Research based workplace programs to encourage healthylifestyles.• Develop new or strengthen existing partnerships.• Empower individuals and communities to make informedchoices regarding healthy behaviors.• Increase awareness of using social media tools (such asblog, Facebook, or email) to reach busy adults.
  • 3. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sPrograms:• Lessons• Blog• E-mail Challenge• Facebook
  • 4. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sLive Healthy Live Well Lessons• Physical Activity: A Good Fit!• Think About What You Drink• Stress Management• Maintaining a Healthy Weight• Cooking for One or Two• Planning Healthy Meals for Meetings• Take Charge of Your Diabetes• Exercise….Not a Puzzle
  • 5. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sBlog• A new way to use the lessons.http://livehealthyosu.com/
  • 6. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sBlog views05000100001500020000250002011 2012 Apr-13
  • 7. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e s• http://go.osu.edu/PRP
  • 8. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sFacebook likes0201220130 100 200 300 400 500 600 700
  • 9. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sFactors affecting decision to usetechnology based program• Fast paced lifestyle of our society• Allows for flexibility to engage in the program• Potential to reach a younger audience• Reaching out to non-traditional audience• Participation not limited to a demographic area
  • 10. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sFactors - continued• Allows for partnerships acrossthe state• Helping companies or employers to offerprogramming that may lower health care costsand a healthier work force• Fewer Family and Consumer SciencesEducators in the state
  • 11. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sWellness Challenge (email)• Started in 2007 with 3 agencies in one countyworking on a online wellness challenge• Expanded in 2009 to 2 counties, 4 agencies• Increased in 2011 to 6 Ohio ExtensionEducators with support of multiplecommunity partners• 2012 has moved to 12 Educators with over1100 participants per challenge
  • 12. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sOur Wellness Program• 2 short email messages a week• Tracking log for participant progress• Weekly wellness themes• Incentives
  • 13. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sSample email messageLive Healthy Live Well – Zero Weight Gain ChallengeBonus Message for January 8, 2013Zero Weight Gain Group:I wanted to remind everyone that we are down to the last week for the Zero Weight Gain end ofprogram survey, I know many of you have already completed it, but if you haven’t please log on tohttp://s.zoomerang.com/s/zwgexit. It should only take you 5 to 10 minutes. The survey will close onJanuary 18 at 11:30 PM. This really helps us with funders and planning future programs. Don’t forget tosend me your log – I have gotten a few – which I will probably reward with extra prizes – they can beemailed to me or faxed to 740-702-3209.I thought on this cool day in Ohio that maybe you could use a little inspiration for some healthy foods toserve this weekend. I know the cold weather from last week has put into my mind comfortfoods, especially soups. While we all know that soups seem to make us feel warmer when it is cool, didyou also know that there is research that shows that a water rich diet may also help you lose moreweight? Researchers from Penn State found that women who ate a low fat diet and water rich foods(vegetables, (more)
  • 14. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e s
  • 15. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sDemographics of SurveyRespondents• 91% Female• 94% Caucasian• Primarily working adults• Over 60 of Ohio Counties, 11 other states• Some participants from prior ExtensionPrograms
  • 16. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e s• 94% Learned new information• 98% Recommend participating in an onlinechallenge to others• 54% Lost weight, 42% maintained currentweight• Respondents lost 406 pounds in Zero WeightGain Challenge –and goal was justmaintenance!Pre/Post Survey Responses
  • 17. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sExamples of Survey Questions• Indicate your level of commitment or interestin improving your diet, managingweight, changing physical activity.• I have no need to.• I have no plans to.• I plan to within the next 6 months.• I already do.
  • 18. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sQuestions - continuedIndicate how often you eat thefollowing foods:• At least 2 different kinds of fruits everyday.• At least 3 different kinds of vegetableseveryday.• Eat whole grain foods such as whole wheatbread.
  • 19. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sQuestions - continued• Eat a dark green or deep yellow vegetable 3 to4 times per week.• Eat breakfast everyday.• Have 3 cups of low-fat dairy productseveryday.
  • 20. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sInteresting FindingsWhen asked “What 1 thing did you like mostabout the challenge?”• 38% Ease of participating• 23% Encouragement from others• 30% Recipes, fitness and nutritionalinformation
  • 21. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sFindings - continuedIncentives-• Although people seem to like themand are excited when they win – theyaren’t always picked up and very low(2%) on what participants liked mostabout challenge
  • 22. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sSuccess Stories• I’m really loving thischallenge. It’s helpingme stay in check. Iwrite down my exercisebefore I go and thatkeeps me motivated togo to class even if I’mtired and I ALWAYSfeel better after Iworkout!• This week I have wentto the YMCA and havebeen walking everynight. Drinking a lot ofwater, and have changedmy eating habits…
  • 23. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sWhat did I learn from the lesson?0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120%Learned new informationPlan to useWhat did I learn
  • 24. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sDemographics of lessons andchallenges• Bad example of graph • Better exampleLessonsColumn189.59090.59191.59292.59393.594LessonsChallengeLessonsColumn10102030405060708090100LessonsChallenge
  • 25. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sDemographics of lessons andchallenges0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%FemalesWhiteChallengeLessons
  • 26. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sProfile of Spring 2013Eat breakfast Everyday 69.0%Eat meat portion size of card deck 4 times per week 41.3%Eat 3 vegetables 4 times per week 40.7%Eat whole grain 4 times per week 35.4%Eat 2 fruit 2-3 times per week 33.7%Eat 3 servings low fat dairy 2-3 times per week 32.3
  • 27. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sProfile of Spring 2013Drink 6 or more glasses of water Everyday 33.2%Read food labels for healthy choice Everyday 29.8%Choose healthy foods as a snack 2-3 times per week 37.2%
  • 28. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sProfile of Spring 2013Eat cookies or dessert 2-3 times per week 38.9%Eat candy 1 time per week or less 34.2%Drink soda or sweet tea 1 time per week or less 58.4%Eat fast food 1 time per week or less 66.3%
  • 29. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sProfile of Spring 2013Sleep 7-8 hours per night 4 or more times per week 29.9%Participate in physical activity at least 30minutes.1 time per week or less 32.4%Use a coping technique to reduce stress 1 time per week or less 37.5%Participate in strength training 1 time per week or less 62.2%
  • 30. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sFuture evaluationRegression analysisEat breakfast Everyday 69.0%Eat meat portion size of card deck 4 times per week 41.3%Eat 3 vegetables 4 times per week 40.7%Eat whole grain 4 times per week 35.4%Eat 2 fruit 2-3 times per week 33.7%Eat 3 servings low fat dairy 2-3 times per week 32.3CorrelationSleep 7-8 hours per night 4 or more times per week 29.9%Participate in physical activity at least 30minutes.1 time per week or less 32.4%Use a coping technique to reduce stress 1 time per week or less 37.5%Participate in strength training 1 time per week or less 62.2%
  • 31. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sPartnerships• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V74AxCqOTvg
  • 32. FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCESH e a l t h y P e o p l e | H e a l t h y R e l a t i o n s h i p s | H e a l t h y F i n a n c e sAll articles were written from research-based resources and information.Developed by: Ohio State University Extension Educators,Family and Consumer Sciences,• Linnette Goard, Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection, and Management,goard.1@osu.edu• Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, FCS, treber.1@osu.edu• Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, FCS, barlage.7@osu.edu• Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator, FCS, brinkman.93@osu.edu• Cindy Shuster, Extension Educator, FCS, shuster.24@osu.edu• Jenny Even, Extension Educator, FCS, even.2@osu.edu• Elizabeth Smith, Program Specialist, Snap-Ed, Northeast Region, smith.3993@osu.eduOhio State University Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all research and related educationalprograms are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to age, ancestry, color, disability, gender identity orexpression, genetic information, HIV/AIDS status, military status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteranstatus. This statement is in accordance with United States Civil Rights Laws and the USDA.Keith L. Smith, Associate Vice President for Agricultural Administration; Associate Dean, College of Food, Agricultural, and EnvironmentalSciences; Director, Ohio State University Extension; and Gist Chair in Extension Education and Leadership.