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Intro to multimedia research project

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  • 1. Introducing . . . the Multi-Media Research Project
  • 2. 21st-Century Literacies Today How is literacy changing in light of a vastly different world? We live in a technology-driven, global, diverse, and quickly changing “flat world.” New literacy skills that attend to these changes are a necessary part of our curricula. ~21st-Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief, NCTE, 2007 ~21st-Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources, NCTE, 2007 ~Literacy Learning in the 21st Century: A Policy Brief, NCTE, 2009
  • 3. ~Did You Know? 2.0 by Karl Fisch and Scott McLeod
  • 4. “The late age of print” ~Jay Bolter “Words are no longer static things, quiet black marks pressed onto a white page; instead, they float alongside sounds and images; they make meaning in their movements. They are visual, aural, and sometimes haptic. As such, their function as objects of literacy is changing in fundamental ways.” ~Ben McCorkle “Multi-Modal Literacy Key Terms,” NCTE, 2007
  • 5. “Literacy has always been a collection of cultural and communicative practices shared among members of particular groups. As society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the intensity and complexity of literate environments, the 21st century demands that a literate person possess a wide range of abilities and competencies, many literacies.” ~NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment, adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies, adopted Feb. 15, 2008
  • 6. “These literacies—from reading online newspapers to participating in virtual classrooms—are multiple, dynamic, and malleable. As in the past, they are inextricably linked with particular histories, life possibilities, and social trajectories of individuals and groups.” ~NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment, adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies, adopted Feb. 15, 2008
  • 7. “Literacy encompasses reading, writing, and a variety of social and intellectual practices that call upon the voice as well as the eye and hand. It also extends to new media—including non-digitized multimedia, digitized multimedia, and hypertext or hypermedia.” ~Adolescent Literacy: A Policy Research Brief, NCTE, 2007
  • 8. 21st-century readers & writers need to be able to: • Develop proficiency with the tools of technology; • Build relationships with others to pose and solve problems collaboratively and cross- culturally; • Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes; ~NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment, adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~Literacy Learning in the 21st Century: A Policy Brief, NCTE, 2009
  • 9. 21st-century readers & writers need to be able to: • Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information; • Create, critique, analyze, and evaluate multi- media texts; and • Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments. ~NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment, adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~Literacy Learning in the 21st Century: A Policy Brief, NCTE, 2009
  • 10. MicheleAnstey&GeoffBull,“DefiningMultiliteracies,”Teachingand LearningMultiliteracies:ChangingTimes,ChangingLiteracies,2006
  • 11. “As new technologies shape literacies, they bring opportunities for teachers at all levels to foster reading and writing in more diverse and participatory contexts.” ~21st-Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief, NCTE, 2007
  • 12. “Being able to read and write in multiple forms of media and integrate them into a meaningful whole is the new hallmark of literacy.” “Students need to be able to use new media collectively as well as individually.” ~Jason Ohler, “Orchestrating the Media Collage” Literacy 2.0 - Educational Leadership, March 2009
  • 13. What are Multi-literacies? • “Multi” in multiliteracies refers to the multiple literacies and literate practices that are used in all sectors of our lives (Anstey & Bull, 2004) • A multiliterate person must be literate in traditional and new communication technologies and the semiotics embedded in them.
  • 14. “Prosumers” • Students should be able to both consume and produce multimodal texts. • Students must then draw upon their repertoire of knowledge, skills and practices and use them to make new meanings.
  • 15. Semiotic/Sign Systems • Linguistic – oral and written language • Visual – still and moving images • Gestural – facial expression, body language • Auditory – music and sound effects • Spatial – layout and organization of objects and space
  • 16. TheNewLondonGroup,“APedagogyofMultiliteracies:Designing SocialFutures”HarvardEducationalReview,1996
  • 17. New Forms Drawing on Old Forms • Hybridity • Intertextuality Borrowing from/weaving together • The arts (music, literature, art) • Performance (ballet, plays) • Design (use of space, graphic arts)
  • 18. Three kinds of relationships between text and illustrations: • Symmetrical - text and illustrations provide same information • Enhancing - text enhances illustrations; illustrations enhance text • Contradictory - text and illustrations each tell a different story - postmodern (Serafini 37-38)
  • 19. Film as Text: • The word cinematography means “writing with light.” • Three aspects of film: – Literary - shared with written texts – Dramatic - shared with live performances – Cinematic - unique to film (Teasley and Wilder)
  • 20. Agenda for Monday, Nov. 1 • Mini-Lesson • Reading/Writing Workshop Model Overview • Peer Feedback on Lesson Plans in Progress • Multiple Intelligences Dance! • Introducing the Multi-Media Research Project