21st Cent Literacy THSP Webinar

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  • 1. 21st Century Literacy Skills Prepare Students for Global Citizenship The International School of the Americas San Antonio, Texas Presented by Honor Moorman Internship and Service Learning Coordinator
  • 2. Defining and Exploring 21 st -Century Literacies
    • 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007
    • 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources for NCTE’s Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007
    • Adolescent Literacy: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007
    • The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies , adopted Feb. 15, 2008
    • NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment , adopted Nov. 19, 2008
    • Writing Now: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2008
    • Literacy Learning in the 21 st Century: A Policy Brief , NCTE, 2009
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5. 21st-Century Literacies Today
    • How is literacy changing in light of a vastly different world?
    • We live in a technology-driven, global, diverse, and quickly changing “flat world.”
    • New literacy skills that attend to these changes are a necessary part of our curricula.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007 ~ Literacy Learning in the 21 st Century: A Policy Brief , NCTE, 2009
  • 6. ~ Did You Know? 2.0 by Karl Fisch and Scott McLeod
  • 7. Large-scale changes in literacy practices are taking place, such as . . .
    • Over 91 million Google searches per day
    • 158.6 billion text messages sent in the U.S. in 2006
    • 71% of students with online access use social networking tools on a weekly basis
    • 75% of college students have a Facebook site
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007 ~ Creating & connecting: Research and guidelines on online social—and educational—networking , National School Boards Association, 2007  
  • 8. Large-scale changes in literacy practices are taking place, such as . . .
    • The existence of at least 61 virtual colleges/universities (VCUs) currently educating students in the U.S.
    • 33 states with National Educational Technology Standards for K–12 students
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 9. Large-scale changes in literacy practices are taking place, such as . . .
    • Future computer-based writing tests of the National Assessment of Educational Progress
    • 50 percent of four-year colleges and 30 percent of community colleges using electronic course management tools
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 10.  
  • 11. Friedman’s Concept of a “Flat World”
    • “ a global web-enabled platform for multiple forms of sharing knowledge and work irrespective of time, distance, geography, and increasingly even language”
    ~ Thomas Friedman, “The World is Flat,” MIT World video, May 16, 2005
  • 12. Skills Needed for the “Flat World”
    • “ In the future, how we educate our children may prove to be more important than how much we educate them.”
    ~ Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat , p. 302
  • 13. 8 Roles and Responsibilities that will create the new middle class
    • Collaborators and orchestrators
    • Synthesizers
    • Explainers
    • Leveragers
    • Adapters
    • Green People
    • Personalizers
    • Localizers
    ~ Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat , chapter 6
  • 14.
    • http://www.edutopia.org/images/graphics/fea_collabage_walls_howworksstat.jpg
    • ~illustration for “World Without Walls: Learning Well with Others: How to teach when learning is everywhere” by Will Richardson
  • 15.  
  • 16. Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future
    • Agricultural Age (farmers)
    • Industrial Age (factory workers)
    • Information Age (knowledge workers)
    • Conceptual Age (creators and empathizers)
    • “ A Whole New Mind reveals the six essential aptitudes on which professional success and personal fulfillment now depend . . .”
    ~ Daniel Pink, A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future
  • 17. Daniel Pink’s “Six Senses”
    • Design - Moving beyond function to engage the sense.
    • Story - Narrative added to products and services - not just argument. Best of the six senses.
    • Symphony - Adding invention and big picture thinking (not just detail focus).
    • Empathy - Going beyond logic and engaging emotion and intuition.
    • Play - Bringing humor and light-heartedness to business and products.
    • Meaning - Immaterial feelings and values of products.
    ~ Daniel Pink, A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future
  • 18. “ The late age of print” ~Jay Bolter
    • Words are no longer static things, quiet black marks pressed onto a white page; instead, they float alongside sounds and images; they make meaning in their movements. They are visual, aural, and sometimes haptic. As such, their function as objects of literacy is changing in fundamental ways.
    • ~Ben McCorkle
    “ Multi-Modal Literacy Key Terms,” NCTE, 2007
  • 19. “ Literacy encompasses reading, writing, and a variety of social and intellectual practices that call upon the voice as well as the eye and hand. It also extends to new media—including non-digitized multimedia, digitized multimedia, and hypertext or hypermedia.” ~ Adolescent Literacy: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007
  • 20. “ Literacy has always been a collection of cultural and communicative practices shared among members of particular groups. As society and technology change, so does literacy. Because technology has increased the intensity and complexity of literate environments, the 21 st century demands that a literate person possess a wide range of abilities and competencies, many literacies.” ~ NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment , adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~ The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies , adopted Feb. 15, 2008
  • 21. “ These literacies—from reading online newspapers to participating in virtual classrooms—are multiple, dynamic, and malleable. As in the past, they are inextricably linked with particular histories, life possibilities, and social trajectories of individuals and groups.” ~ NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment , adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~ The NCTE Definition of 21st Century Literacies , adopted Feb. 15, 2008
  • 22. 21 st -century readers and writers need to be able to:
    • Develop proficiency with the tools of technology;
    • Build relationships with others to pose and solve problems collaboratively and cross-culturally;
    • Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes;
    ~ NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment , adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~ Literacy Learning in the 21 st Century: A Policy Brief , NCTE, 2009
  • 23. 21 st -century readers and writers need to be able to:
    • Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information;
    • Create, critique, analyze, and evaluate multi-media texts; and
    • Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments.
    ~ NCTE Framework for 21st Century Curriculum and Assessment , adopted Nov. 19, 2008 ~ Literacy Learning in the 21 st Century: A Policy Brief , NCTE, 2009
  • 24. “ As new technologies shape literacies, they bring opportunities for teachers at all levels to foster reading and writing in more diverse and participatory contexts.” ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007
  • 25.  
  • 26. Changing Ideas about Literacy amidst 21st-Century Changes
    • What changes in schooling help support the needs of 21st-century literacy learners?
    • 21st-century literacy requires core academic subjects; learning and innovation skills; and life and career skills along with technology skills.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 27.
    • Electronic reading workshops show that they support the emergence of new literacies, and digital technology enhances writing and interaction in several ways.
    • K–12 students who write with computers produce compositions of greater length and higher quality and are more engaged with and motivated toward writing than their peers.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 28.
    • College students who keep e-portfolios have a higher rate of academic achievement and a higher overall retention rate than their peers.
    • Students who receive online response to writing revise better than those participating in traditional collaboration.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 29. Research-Based Recommendations for Effective Instruction in 21st-Century Literacies
    • Research shows that effective instruction in 21st-century literacies takes an integrated approach, helping students understand how to access, evaluate, synthesize, and contribute to information.
    • Furthermore, as Web 2.0 demonstrates, participation is key, and effective teachers will find ways to encourage interaction with and among students.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007
  • 30. Teacher Strategies for 21st-Century Literacy
    • What strategies can teachers use to engage 21st-century literacy in the classroom?
    • Encouraging students to reflect regularly about the role of technology in their learning.
    • Creating a website and inviting students to use it to continue class discussions and bring in outside voices.
    • Giving students strategies for evaluating the quality of information they find on the Internet.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 31.
    • Being open about their strengths and limitations with technology and inviting students to help.
    • Exploring technologies students are using outside of class and finding ways to incorporate them into teaching.
    • Using a wiki to develop a multi-modal reader’s guide to a class text.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 32.
    • Including a broad variety of media and genres in class texts.
    • Asking students to create a podcast to share with an authentic audience.
    • Giving students explicit instruction about how to avoid plagiarism in a digital environment.
    ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: A Policy Research Brief , NCTE, 2007 ~ 21 st -Century Literacies: Supplemental Resources , NCTE, 2007
  • 33. 21 st Century Student Outcomes
    • Core Subjects and 21 st Century Themes
    • Learning and Innovation Skills
    • Information, Media and Technology Skills
    • Life and Career Skills
    ~ “Framework for 21 st Century Learning,” Partnership for 21st Century Skills
  • 34. 21 st Century Student Outcomes
    • Core Subjects and 21 st Century Themes
    • Global Awareness
    • Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy
    • Civic Literacy
    • Health Literacy
    • Learning and Innovation Skills
    • Creativity and Innovation
    • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Communication and Collaboration
    ~ “Framework for 21 st Century Learning,” Partnership for 21st Century Skills
  • 35. 21 st Century Student Outcomes
    • Information, Media and Technology Skills
    • Information Literacy
    • Media Literacy
    • ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy
    • Life and Career Skills
    • Flexibility and Adaptability
    • Initiative and Self-Direction
    • Social and Cross-Cultural Skills
    • Productivity and Accountability
    • Leadership and Responsibility
    ~ “Framework for 21 st Century Learning,” Partnership for 21st Century Skills
  • 36. National Educational Technology Standards for Students
    • 1. Creativity and Innovation
    • 2. Communication and Collaboration
    • 3. Research and Information Fluency
    • 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making
    • 5. Digital Citizenship
    • 6. Technology Operations and Concepts
    ~ “NETS: The Next Generation,” International Society for Technology in Education
  • 37. What students must master to succeed.
    • Learn:
    • Access, evaluate, and use different forms of information
    • Exercise critical thinking
    • Exhibit fluency with tech tools
    • Create:
    • Use various forms of media when presenting ideas
    • Display originality
    • Employ problem-solving skills
    • Collaborate:
    • Work successfully as a team
    • Demonstrate cross-cultural awareness
    • Communicate complex ideas effectively
    http://www.edutopia.org/images/graphics/fea_collabage_walls_newskillsstat.jpg ~illustration for “World Without Walls: Learning Well with Others: How to teach when learning is everywhere” by Will Richardson