Green Workforce Demand Assessment forLumber River Regional Construction Sector        Bladen | Hoke | Robeson | Scotland  ...
Table of ContentsTable of Contents ..........................................................................................
Green Workforce Demand Assessment for                            Lumber River Regional Construction Sector                ...
MethodologyOur team engaged contractors and businesses across Bladen, Hoke, Robeson, and Scotland Counties withdifferent m...
recovers, they expect a significant increase in demand for those types of systems. Such evidence helps tolegitimize the ne...
Assessment of Green Construction Trainings        Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit, Rating ...
Certification(s):   LEED Green AssociateRelevant Trades:    Commercial sector Crew chiefs, Foremen, General Contractors, D...
Nearest Provider:     Micro Inc. & several othersPre-requisite:        Construction experience recommended; high school ma...
Costs:                   $950 class; $400 examRe-Certification:        3 years ($300 exam)Webpage:                 http://...
Community College SnapshotBased on the variations in construction sector characteristics across our region, and difference...
Relevant Trainings:    Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit / Home Energy Upgrades, Rating and...
between our area’s four colleges9 would help to leverage training resources and certainly be of great benefit indeveloping...
Spring 2012      March / Apr: BPI Training continued      March / Apr: NCCER Training continued      Apr / May: NABCEP ...
Appendix A – Survey Results                              13
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Appendix B – NCESC Data Table                                                          Lumber River WDB                   ...
Demand Assessment for Green Construction Training
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Transcript of "Demand Assessment for Green Construction Training"

  1. 1. Green Workforce Demand Assessment forLumber River Regional Construction Sector Bladen | Hoke | Robeson | Scotland Lumber River Workforce Development Board Green Team
  2. 2. Table of ContentsTable of Contents ...................................................................................................................................................1Purpose....................................................................................................................................................................2Background ............................................................................................................................................................2Definition of Terms ................................................................................................................................................2Objectives................................................................................................................................................................2Methodology ...........................................................................................................................................................3Assessment Overview.............................................................................................................................................3Interpreting Survey Data ......................................................................................................................................4Key Findings from Survey ....................................................................................................................................4Qualitative Feedback .............................................................................................................................................4Assessment of Green Construction Trainings .....................................................................................................5 Energy Efficient Building, Weatherization, Retrofit, Rating & Assessment Trainings......................................................... 5 In-Door Environmental Quality Trainings ........................................................................................................................... 6 Deconstruction, Waste Reduction & Materials Use / Re-use Trainings ............................................................................. 7 Water / Waste-Water Trainings .......................................................................................................................................... 7 Renewable Power Trainings ................................................................................................................................................ 8Other Trainings......................................................................................................................................................8Capacity Building, Job Placement & Job Creation ............................................................................................8Community College Snapshot...............................................................................................................................9 Bladen Community College ................................................................................................................................................. 9 Richmond Community College ............................................................................................................................................ 9 Robeson Community College .............................................................................................................................................. 9 Sandhills Community College ............................................................................................................................................ 10Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................................10Prospective Training Timeline............................................................................................................................11Appendix ......................................................................................................................................................... 13-19 A. Green Construction Survey Results ....................................................................................................................... 13-17 B. NCESC Data Table ....................................................................................................................................................... 18 C. EMSI Occupation Reports: .......................................................................................................................................... 19 a. Energy Efficiency............................................................................................................... Attached Separately b. Solar Power....................................................................................................................... Attached Separately 1
  3. 3. Green Workforce Demand Assessment for Lumber River Regional Construction Sector Bladen | Hoke | Robeson | Scotland Completed: March 11, 2011PurposeThe primary purpose of this Assessment is to determine the demand for green construction skills from regionalemployers so that training opportunities (leading to industry-recognized certifications) can be created that bestmeet both the immediate and projected workforce needs of individuals and businesses that are working orintend to expand into these sectors.BackgroundThe Lumber River Workforce Development Board (LRWDB) is participating as one of four project teams in theState Energy Sector Partnership (SESP) grant. Funds are provided by the American Recovery and ReinvestmentAct (ARRA) and were awarded to the LRWDB by the North Carolina Department of Commerce. By January2013, the grant intends to serve a minimum of 210 participants in the green construction and sustainableagriculture sectors by paying for training costs (e.g. tuition, fees, supplies, etc), paid work experience (i.e.internships, apprenticeships, or OJT), and if necessary, support services (e.g. travel, child care, etc). Of the 210participants, a minimum of 135 will receive training and credentials in a green construction related field. ThisAssessment deals exclusively with the green construction component of the grant.Definition of TermsFor the purposes of this grant, the term “Green Construction” may include the following sectors and sub-sectors: energy-efficient / high-performance building, weatherization (Wx), energy retrofit, rating andassessment industries serving residential, commercial or industrial sectors; in-door environmental qualityrelated to mold abatement, lead paint or asbestos remediation; deconstruction, waste reduction, and materialsuse / re-use industries; water and waste water management (non-municipal); manufacturers that producesustainable products using environmentally sustainable processes and materials; and energy efficient andadvanced drive train vehicle industries.ObjectivesAssessing the skills, credentials and workforce needs of existing construction professionals in our region is acritical component in determining the best demand-driven blend of training opportunities pertaining to greenconstruction.The Assessment was conducted to achieve the following objectives:  Assess contractors’ training needs and demand for green construction skills from our workforce  Determine the specific trainings and certifications that would meet those needs  Formulate a Plan of Action with regional educational institutions and / or other training providers  Gather information from contractors and construction-related businesses to develop a collaborative network of resources and tools that can be utilized to support the growth of these sectors 2
  4. 4. MethodologyOur team engaged contractors and businesses across Bladen, Hoke, Robeson, and Scotland Counties withdifferent methods including: presentations to both Robeson and Scotland Home Builders Associations (HBAs);creating and distributing nearly 150 Green Construction Surveys by mail and email; conducting individualinterviews by telephone and personally visiting numerous contractors. Contractors from all trades (e.g.electrical, mechanical, plumbing, etc) and all segments (residential, commercial, industrial) were included(Survey Q1) because each has unique relevance among the diversity of green construction sectors. A wide-range in the size of businesses that responded (based on number of workers employed) was another diversifyingelement of the Assessment (Survey Q10). From these efforts, we were able to gather the qualitative feedbackand quantitative metrics necessary to meet the objectives previously stated.Assessment OverviewThe results suggest that there is a lack of exposure to green construction skills among the region’s workforce,mostly stemming from a lack of demand for those products and services. From conducting the survey andspeaking with a wide range of construction professionals across our four counties, it is evident that theeconomic downturn has contributed to a severe slowdown in construction related activities – especially newconstruction.1 For most contractors, the majority of their current revenue is derived from renovations andremodeling. A prudent training initiative would have to respond to that reality by shifting emphasis towardsthose labor skills. With green construction, that translates into building performance contracting, energy-efficient retrofits, weatherization, home energy upgrades and other skill sets that address renovation work toexisting buildings. Specific trainings are discussed later in this report.The cost premium (or perceived costs) of green products or services was cited as a driving factor for the lack of“green” projects in the region. That sentiment alone highlights the problematic nature of how “green” isdefined, since the return-on-investment (or payback period) varies greatly depending on both the type andapplication of that particular product or service. Many “green” products and services do have an associated upfront cost that can often be offset with federal and state tax incentives (or direct rebates). Basic paybackcalculations for home energy upgrades clearly support these initiatives. And when fully realized, theseincentives can make photovoltaic (PV) systems an attractive investment. However, many consumers around ourregion on average have little or no discretionary income and are being more conservative with spending habits,which obviously leads to less demand for higher cost-related items (e.g. PV systems). This too will influencethe focus of training away from renewable energy technologies (typically more costly) and more in the directionof energy efficiency. With the cost of energy on the rise once again, consumers are looking for ways to reducetheir utility and heating bills.2The cost of training was also one of the main reasons many companies have not upgraded their workforce withthese skills. Most of the companies surveyed (89%), or interviewed in person, expressed interest in participatingin a program where the costs were lower or subsidized, and the training schedule flexible. Despite contractorsadmitting that it is difficult to justify the training expense due to the low, or niche demand for some of theseskills, there were glaring exceptions. For example, a prominent HVAC company that operates both in andoutside our region has experienced a 10-fold increase in the number of geothermal heat pumps installed, as wellas a similar increase in solar panel (PV) systems for homes in recent years. The company went on to say that aspeople become more educated regarding the systems (including the associated tax incentives) and the economy1 Between 2007-2009, applications for building permits declined by greater than 50% (Robeson) according to the Robeson CountyBuilding Inspection Office.2 See EIA: http://www.eia.doe.gov/steo/gifs/Fig23.gif 3
  5. 5. recovers, they expect a significant increase in demand for those types of systems. Such evidence helps tolegitimize the need to diversify the overall scope of training opportunities. The latter half of this Assessmentdescribes and recommends such a blend of trainings for our region’s workforce.Interpreting Survey DataWhen analyzing the survey results, it is important to note that the scope of possible trainings and certificationswas narrower (i.e. primarily focused on energy efficient / green building) than how the term “greenconstruction” is defined on page one. This is due primarily to the early development of the survey itself whereother certifications (e.g. ABPA Back-flow Preventer) were not yet considered. Simplicity and practicality werealso factors in constructing a survey that addressed the grant’s core focus and was concise enough to completein a reasonable amount of time for business leaders.Key Findings from Survey  Roughly half of respondents (49%) said they would hire, or likely hire, workers that have advanced / green construction certifications (Survey Q4).  89% would definitely / likely have current employees trained in advanced / green certification programs, if the training costs were covered (Survey Q6).  Approximately 1 in 4 companies surveyed said they perform or offer energy efficiency products or green services (Survey Q2) but few (<10% on average) actually possessed an industry-recognized certification (Survey Q3).  LEED Certification was the most recognizable green certification. GreenAdvantage was the least recognizable certifications (Survey Q3).  Close to 60% of respondents cited cost, lack of skilled workers, lack of demand, and equipment costs as inhibitors to hiring workers with those skills. 70% cited lack of demand as the main barrier to hiring those individuals (Survey Q5).  Over 70% of survey respondents stated that cost of training / recertification was the main barrier to training their current workforce in these skills, followed closely by time away from work and a lack of demand for those skills (Survey Q7).  Over 87% felt flexible classroom scheduling, flexible field testing, paid apprenticeships, and/or subsidized on-the-job-training would be beneficial to their company (Survey Q9).Qualitative FeedbackThe insight gained from phone and in-person interviews was without question the most valuable source ofinformation for this Assessment. Although there were clear consistencies found between the survey andinterviews, when speaking outside the limited view of the survey, contractors revealed a more amiableperspective towards green sector opportunities as well as showing a strong interest in several differentconstruction-related trainings that fall within the grant’s scope of allowable trainings (e.g. lead paint abatementcertifications). Those consistencies coupled with a few exceptions that surfaced throughout the Assessment,point toward a more complete picture of what the immediate and projected demand for green constructiontraining looks like around our region. The following section addresses these specific trainings; thecorresponding certification; and additional information that will be useful to our local community colleges,training providers, employers, key stakeholders, JobLink centers, and others involved in creating these trainingopportunities around our region. 4
  6. 6. Assessment of Green Construction Trainings Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit, Rating and Assessment IndustriesInstitute: Building Performance Institute (BPI)Certification(s): Building Analyst (BA) Envelope (Env) Weatherization Technician (Wx Tech / WHALC)Relevant Trades: HVAC / mechanical, Insulators, General Contractors, remodelersNearest Provider: Richmond Community College (Laurinburg)3; Central Carolina Community College (Sanford); Cape Fear Green Building Alliance (Wilmington)Pre-requisite: Construction experience recommended; high school math competencyCourse Format: 32 class hours; 8 hours field testingCosts: $500 Field Exam & Test Fees; does not include trainingRe-Certification: 3 years ($200)Webpage: http://www.bpi.org/Demand Response: BPI is a nationally recognized leader in home performance training. Participants gain skills to work in weatherization programs, assess building performance, energy auditing, remediation, and execute job site fixes. With renovation and remodeling accounting for the vast majority of construction in our region, these skills offer contractors new and advanced training necessary to meet customers’ needs for greater energy efficiency and home performance.Institute: NCCERCertification(s): Intro to Wx → Wx Tech Level 1 → Building Auditor Level 2 or Wx Crew Chief Fundamentals of Weatherization (90hrs, includes NCCER Core)Relevant Trades: HVAC, carpentry, renovators, and other general construction tradesNearest Provider: Robeson Community College4; Pitt Community CollegePre-requisite: Construction experience not required for Fundamentals of WxCourse Format: 90 hours (Wx Fundamentals); 17.5 hours (Intro); 145 hours (Wx Tech) 162 hours (Wx Crew Chief); 172 hours (Building Auditor)Costs: $62 trainee guide/text; course cost dependent on collegeRe-Certification: 12 hours of CE credits every 2 yearsWebpage: http://www.nccer.org/green.aspxDemand Response: This is a completely new training curriculum from NCCER that offers a career pathway in the weatherization field. The Fundamentals of Weatherization course (90 hours) includes the NCCER Core. For students that already have completed NCCER Core, they could move directly into the Intro class (17.5 hours) and then onto higher levels. Because the curriculum is new, it will be important to take a close look at course details, equipment requirements, and overall costs. The career pathway in Wx is a definite upside.Institute: LEED – US Green Building Council (North Carolina LEED Triangle Chapter)3 Richmond Community College is currently applying to become a certified BPI Affiliate and expect to achieve this accreditation laterthis spring by partnering with Green Collar Crew, Inc. (Charlotte, NC).4 Robeson Community College – Continuing Ed. and PSRC Career Center have curriculum alignment with NCCER. Although theNCCER Core class did not make in January 2011, the SESP grant could provide training funding for the Fundamentals ofWeatherization course which includes the NCCER Core curriculum. This course serves as a career pathway in weatherization. 5
  7. 7. Certification(s): LEED Green AssociateRelevant Trades: Commercial sector Crew chiefs, Foremen, General Contractors, Design,Nearest Provider: Central Carolina Community College (Sanford); NC LEED Triangle Chapter (Raleigh)Pre-requisite: LEED GA is now the prerequisite for the LEED APCourse Format: 12 - 15 hours class prepCosts: $200 Test Fees; does not include trainingRe-Certification: 15 hours of CE credits every 2 years ($50)Webpage: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=1815Demand Response: Course is designed to introduce participants to the US Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green Rating System. The LEED Green Associate is now the prerequisite for LEED AP – the nationally recognized certification for LEED builders, contractors, architects, and other building professionals. Contractors around our region are interested in acquiring LEED certification to incorporate into their building practices and services. The LEED GA & AP accreditations are focused primarily on the commercial sector, whereas LEED AP Homes is the only residential credential for LEED. In-door Environmental Quality TrainingInstitute: EPA / NC DHHS / Health Hazards Control Unit (HHCU)Certification(s): Lead-Safe Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP)Relevant Trades: Renovators, remodelers, painters, general construction, environmentalNearest Provider: Fayetteville Technical Community CollegePre-requisite: Construction experience recommendedCourse Format: 1 – 2 day classCosts: $250 class + certification; vary by training providerRe-Certification: 3 yearsWebpage: http://www.epi.state.nc.us/epi/lead/lhmp.htmlDemand Response: In 2010, new regulations required renovators to be certified in safe lead removal. And again, because much of the construction now is in the form of renovation and remodels of existing, older structures, this training is in high demand so that renovators stay in compliance.Institute: EPA / NC DHHS / Health Hazards Control Unit (HHCU)Certification(s): Asbestos Worker InitialRelevant Trades: Renovators, remodelers, general construction, environmentalNearest Provider: Republic Industries, Inc. (Wilmington); The EI Group, Inc. (Morrisville)Pre-requisite: Construction experience recommended; high school math competencyCourse Format: 4 days (32 hours)Costs: $350 vary depending on training providerRe-Certification: 3 yearsWebpage: http://www.epi.state.nc.us/epi/asbestos.htmlDemand Response: Because much of the construction now is in the form of renovation and remodels of existing, older structures, this training is in high demand so that renovators stay in compliance.Institute: EPA / NC DHHS / Health Hazards Control Unit (HHCU)Certification(s): Certified Mold Remediation Contractor (CMRC)Relevant Trades: Renovators, remodelers, environmental 6
  8. 8. Nearest Provider: Micro Inc. & several othersPre-requisite: Construction experience recommended; high school math competencyCourse Format: 2 daysCosts: $365; vary depending on training providerRe-Certification: 3 yearsWebpage: http://www.moldcareer.com/mold-remediation-contractor-cmrc.phpDemand Response: Because much of the construction now is in the form of renovation and remodels of existing, older structures, this training is in demand. Deconstruction, Waste Reduction, and Materials Use / Re-use IndustriesInstitute: Institute of Inspection, Cleaning & Restoration Certification (IICRC Restoration Coach)Certification(s): Water Damage Restoration Tech (WRT); Applied Structural Drying Tech (ASD)Relevant Trades: Environmental, General Contractors, remodelers, dry wall, carpeting, otherNearest Provider: Florida, OhioPre-requisite: Construction experience recommendedCourse Format: 32 class hours; 8 hours field testingCosts: $1,200-$1,450 combo classWebpage: http://www.restorationcoach.com/Demand Response: In flood situations, interior components of a building that are affected by water are often deconstructed and hauled off as waste. These trainings teach skills in how to properly dry much of the building’s structure and components (e.g. drywall, carpet) and divert the waste. There are only six of these specialized training facilities in the world – the closest being Florida. This will be an incumbent worker training grant opportunity for a regional company interested in applying. Travel will not be reimbursable for out-of-state training. Water / Waste-Water Management (non-municipal)Institute: American Backflow Preventer Association (ABPA)Certification(s): ABPA Certified Backflow Preventer TechnicianRelevant Trades: Plumbers, water and waste water techniciansNearest Provider: Central Piedmont Community College (Charlotte); Wilson Community College (Wilson)Pre-requisite: 2 years of backflow preventer experience recommended; plumbing experience requiredCourse Format: 2 daysCosts: $100Re-Certification: 3 years ($85)Webpage: http://abpa.org/tester.htmDemand Response: New regulations and requirements for commercial and industrial backflow preventer controls. This is a specialized training opportunity for regional plumbers or similarly skilled construction professionals to diversify their services. Renewable Electric Power IndustriesInstitute: North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP)Certification(s): Certified PV Installer; Certified Solar Thermal InstallerRelevant Trades: Electrical, plumbing, roofing, welding, general constructionNearest Provider: NC Solar CenterPre-requisite: Specialized trade experienceCourse Format: 5 days; exam 7
  9. 9. Costs: $950 class; $400 examRe-Certification: 3 years ($300 exam)Webpage: http://www.ncsc.ncsu.edu/Demand Response: Solar PV and Thermal are emerging with one or two firms potentially establishing manufacturing facilities5 and solar farms in the region. Businesses and residences are beginning to request this product more frequently. March 15th is the deadline for community colleges to apply for the NC Solar Center’s SMAPSIT program. The successful applicant is allowed to send instructors to the Solar Center and receive free training in NABCEP Solar PV and Solar Thermal training and certification preparation. Solar Thermal (solar hot water) is typically the more economically-viable technology.Other TrainingsRegional economic developers and other officials are in conversations with companies interested in utilizingbiomass boilers to sell electricity back into the grid. In the event that one or both companies decide to locatewithin the region, training opportunities that pertain to biomass boilers (renewable power generation) could bemade available.There are other certifications and trainings pertaining to green building that may be organized in independentworkshops. The National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) Certified Green Professional (CGP) is ofinterest to several contractors around the region. RESNET’s Home Energy Survey Professional (HESP) is yetanother certification that targets home energy efficiency at a very basic level. Building suppliers and homeimprovement stores may have sales representatives interested in this training.Capacity Building, Job Placement & Job CreationIt is important to distinguish these trainings by how they might each impact the workforce differently.Especially when thinking in terms of the business development that will be critical to the success of new energyefficient building, weatherization, and performance contracting ventures. Gearing initial trainings towardscontractors should help increase awareness and implementation of these new skills into business practices. Ifsuccessful, employers will capitalize on the value of those skills and demand should increase for weatherizationtechnicians, energy auditors, and similar trades. A viable career path will emerge for workers in these fields asbusinesses strengthen.At this point, the number of full-time employees (FTEs) expected to be generated among existing and / or newbusinesses in these sub-sectors is difficult to estimate. But based on employer feedback, regional employmentdata6 and sector-specific occupation reports7, it is reasonable to establish these trainings and then adjust thefrequency of course offerings based on demand changes.Trainings that focus on in-door environmental quality are ideal not only for incumbent workers that lackrequired credentials or skills to remain in secured employment, but also to individuals seeking work withrenovators and remodelers. The same could be said of the waste water management and water restorationtrainings – both unique credentials that could provide the individual or incumbent worker with a specializedniche and potentially a competitive edge in the workforce.5 Currently the name of the solar manufacturers must remain confidential.6 NCESC: Lumber River WDB – Insured Employment for Industries Potentially Involved in Green Economic Activities within theEnergy Efficiency & Agricultural and Natural Resources Conservation – see table in Appendix B7 EMSI Regional Occupation Reports: Energy Efficiency & Solar Power – see report in Appendix C 8
  10. 10. Community College SnapshotBased on the variations in construction sector characteristics across our region, and differences in educationalresources, certain trainings will have a more logical “fit” with some colleges over others. The snapshot belowincludes the trainings that correspond with the counties where Assessment feedback and information wasgathered. Each county is served by a different college:Bladen Community CollegeCharacteristics of County Construction Sectors: New construction remains slow; renovations and remodelingare primary sources of revenue for construction companies. Contractors report that home owners frequentlyexpress interest in ways they can reduce energy bills. Some contractors have built EnergyStar homes both inand outside of Bladen County. One contractor expressed interest in becoming LEED AP certified.Relevant Trainings:  Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit / Home Energy Upgrades, Rating and Assessment Industries (BPI, NCCER Wx Courses)  In-Door Environmental Quality (lead paint renovator, asbestos, mold abatement)  ABPA Certified Backflow Preventer Technician (specifically requested by a Bladen contractor)  LEED Green Associate & AP training (GBCI)Richmond Community CollegeCharacteristics of County Construction Sectors: New construction remains slow; renovations and remodelingare primary sources of revenue for construction companies. Contractors report that home owners frequentlyexpress interest in ways they can reduce energy bills. There are businesses in Scotland County (e.g. ServiceThread Manufacturing Inc.) that are very progressive and highly successful with implementing renewableenergy power generation and energy efficient upgrades. Richmond Community College has been proactive inworking towards becoming a BPI Affiliate. Their satellite campus in Laurinburg (Honeycutt Center) alreadyhad much of the equipment and their facility is geared to conduct the training.Relevant Trainings:  Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit / Home Energy Upgrades, Rating and Assessment Industries (BPI certifications)  In-Door Environmental Quality (lead paint renovator, asbestos, mold abatement)  ABPA Certified Backflow Preventer Technician  Solar Thermal (solar hot water) Systems (NABCEP)Robeson Community CollegeCharacteristics of County Construction Sectors: New construction remains slow; renovations and remodelingare primary sources of revenue for construction companies. Contractors report that home owners frequentlyexpress interest in ways they can reduce energy bills. There are businesses and organizations in RobesonCounty that are progressive and successful with building energy efficient structures (e.g. DHHS’s new LEEDbuilding; 50+ EnergyStar homes of the Lumbee Tribe). Robeson Community College and PSRC Career Centerhas NCCER master instructors that could build a weatherization program that compliments RichmondCommunity College’s BPI Program. A historically strong welding program could incorporate the fabrication ofSolar Thermal (solar hot water) panels. Several contractors expressed interest in becoming LEED AP certified.Those that are already LEED certified are interested in having a local training provider of CE credits for thepurposes of re-certification. 9
  11. 11. Relevant Trainings:  Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit / Home Energy Upgrades, Rating and Assessment Industries (NCCER certifications)  In-Door Environmental Quality (lead paint renovator, asbestos, mold abatement)  ABPA Certified Backflow Preventer Technician  Solar Thermal (solar hot water) Systems (NABCEP)  LEED Green Associate & AP training (GBCI)Sandhills Community CollegeCharacteristics of County Construction Sectors: Hoke County has seen an increase in new construction andbegun to benefit from the BRAC expansion. Surrounding counties to the east (Cumberland) and northwest(Moore) have experienced economic growth that well-exceeds state and national growth rates. Median incomesfor residents of these surrounding counties are higher than the Lumber River four-county region. Solarcompanies in these areas have been installing PV systems for years and there is a Green Home BuildersAssociation in Moore County. Training in solar PV installation, as well as green building design (LEED) wouldhelp to serve the workforce needs of businesses in these sectors.Relevant Trainings:  LEED Green Associate & LEED AP certifications  Solar PV Installers (NABCEP)  Solar Thermal (solar hot water) Installers (NABCEP)  Energy-efficient building, Weatherization (Wx), Energy Retrofit / Home Energy Upgrades, Rating and Assessment Industries (BPI certifications)  In-Door Environmental Quality (lead paint renovator, asbestos, mold abatement)  ABPA Certified Backflow Preventer TechnicianConclusionIt is unlikely that all of the trainings described above will be offered, but they do represent a practical blend ofopportunities that respond to the varied demands from construction sector employers across this region. Whenoutside training providers are brought into the region, community college instructors are eligible to receivetraining and other assistance dedicated to the effort of that college becoming a provider of that training itself(e.g. Richmond Community College as BPI Affiliate). In situations where the college is not interested inbecoming an accredited training provider, their instructors may still apply for training and host the workshop.This may be the case with certain trainings for some of our colleges if there are sufficient participants in thearea to justify a local workshop. Without the colleges and local educational institutions having an active rolewith these programs, the probability of these initiatives achieving a legacy of sustained success will be greatlydiminished.Developing partnerships will therefore be essential to the long-term success and sustainability of this workforcetraining initiative. Four County Community Services, their weatherization contractors, and RichmondCommunity College’s BPI training is an example of key stakeholders coming together with shared interests thatyield mutual benefit. In other regions around North Carolina, community colleges collaborate on how theirdifferentiated training programs might compliment and work together.8 Establishing a common strategy8 Sustainable Energy Training partnerships between Pitt, Beaufort, Lenoir, & Roanoke-Chowan Community Colleges (see:http://www.pittcc.edu/continuing-education/programs/occupational-extension/weatherization.html) 10
  12. 12. between our area’s four colleges9 would help to leverage training resources and certainly be of great benefit indeveloping a region-wide weatherization program that is accessible and non-duplicative.We will also look to the utilities of our region as key partners. Both Progress Energy and Lumbee River EMChave clear targets that are set by the state of North Carolina’s Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (REPS).Meeting those energy efficiency and renewable energy requirements represent tangible business opportunitiesand sustained source of demand well into the future.Lastly, it is imperative to highlight the businesses that have already stepped forward and currently operate inthese sectors. They all contributed valuable insight during this Assessment process and expressed an interestand willingness to act as Green Champions with the initiatives that are relevant to their businesses. Some ofthese champions are: Envirodynamics, LLC; Lowry Construction & Mechanical, Inc.; Lumbee EnterpriseDevelopment, Inc.; RGS Builders, Inc.; Simmons Heating & Air, Inc.; T & L Complete Construction;Whitehead Enterprises, Inc.Prospective Training TimelineSpring 2011  March 15: NC Solar Center – SMAPSIT Deadline for PV & Solar Thermal Applications (NABCEP)  March 17: Green Conference: engage community, collaborate, and begin enrolling participants  April 4-8: BPI Building Analyst & Envelope Training @ Richmond Community College  April: IIRC Water Restoration Tech & Structural Drying Training (pending grantees)  May 22-25: BPI Weatherization Technician Training @ Richmond Community College  May: EPA Lead Training (RRP) @ TBDSummer 2011  June: BPI Weatherization  June: ABPA Backflow Preventer Training  June: NCCER Fundamentals of Wx  June: NABCEP Training (Solar PV & Thermal) @ NC Solar Center (pending)  July / August: Work Experience (apprenticeships, OJT)Fall 2011  August: NCCER Wx Technician (Level 1)  August: BPI Building Analyst & Envelope  Sept / Oct: EPA Lead Training (RRP); Asbestos & Mold Training @ TBD  Work Experience continuedWinter 2011 / 12  Dec / Jan: LEED Green Associate @ TBD  Jan: NCCER Wx Crew Chief  Jan: BPI Training  Work Experience (apprenticeships, OJT) continued9 Bladen, Richmond, Robeson, and Sandhills Community Colleges reside within the Lumber River Workforce Development region. 11
  13. 13. Spring 2012  March / Apr: BPI Training continued  March / Apr: NCCER Training continued  Apr / May: NABCEP Solar Thermal / PV Training @ NC Solar Center  Work Experience (apprenticeships, OJT) continuedSummer 2012  June / July: EPA Lead Training (RRP); Asbestos & Mold Training @ TBD  July / Aug: ABPA Backflow Preventer Training @ TBD  Work Experience (apprenticeships, OJT) continuedFall 2012  Aug: NCCER Building Auditor  Aug: BPI Training  Work Experience (apprenticeships, OJT) continuedWinter 2012  LEED AP Training @ TBD  Work Experience (apprenticeships, OJT) continued SESP State Energy Sector Partnership Grant “Funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to the State of North Carolina / Lumber River Workforce Development Board – an Equal Opportunity Employer / Program with auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities” 12
  14. 14. Appendix A – Survey Results 13
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  19. 19. Appendix B – NCESC Data Table Lumber River WDB Insured Employment for Industries Potentially Involved in Green Economic Activities within the Energy Efficiency & Agricultral and Natural Resources Conservation Employment Number of Establishments Employment Percent Change 2008 to 2009 2009 2000 to 2000 2008 2000 2008 2009 4th Qtr 4th Qtr 2008 Naics Industries 4th Qtr 111 Crop Production 61 55 56 524 433 371 -17.4% -14.3% 112 Animal Production 45 49 48 556 575 550 3.4% -4.3% 113 Forestry and Logging 43 30 33 312 189 183 -39.4% -3.2% 115 Agriculture & Forestry Support Activity 16 18 19 186 95 132 -48.9% 38.9% 236 Construction of Buildings 107 90 83 594 942 587 58.6% -37.7% 237 Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction 23 24 21 425 215 213 -49.4% -0.9% 238 Specialty Trade Contractors 259 249 240 1,965 1,956 1,538 -0.5% -21.4% 311 Food Manufacturing 18 21 20 7,901 10,788 9,657 36.5% -10.5% 312 Beverage & Tobacco Product Mfg * * 4 * * 100 * * 313 Textile Mills 38 22 18 7,308 1,572 1,466 -78.5% -6.7% 314 Textile Product Mills 4 8 6 259 320 297 23.6% -7.2% 321 Wood Product Manufacturing 23 13 13 1,815 360 184 -80.2% -48.9% 324 Petroleum and Coal Products Mfg * * * * * * * * 325 Chemical Mfg * 7 8 * 460 443 * -3.7% 326 Plastics & Rubber Products Mfg * 5 6 * 330 240 * -27.3% 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Product Mfg * 12 12 * 453 404 * -10.8% 332 Fabricated Metal Product Mfg 15 14 13 1,253 888 605 -29.1% -31.9% 333 Machinery Mfg 11 8 8 199 169 93 -15.1% -45.0% 334 Computer and Electronic Product Mfg 5 * * 554 * * * * 335 Electrical Equipment & Appliances * * * * * * * * 336 Transportation Equipment Mfg 10 8 7 582 688 539 18.2% -21.7% 337 Furniture and Related Product Mfg 11 7 6 580 130 93 -77.6% -28.5% 423 Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods 62 76 80 529 917 922 73.3% 0.5% 424 Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods 63 61 60 1,012 936 948 -7.5% 1.3% 441 Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers 105 99 100 1,049 1,005 890 -4.2% -11.4% 442 Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores 43 22 21 359 299 288 -16.7% -3.7% 443 Electronics and Appliance Stores 21 17 15 85 89 92 4.7% 3.4% 444 Building Material & Garden Supply Stores 46 44 42 654 606 520 -7.3% -14.2% 445 Food and Beverage Stores 91 66 70 2,028 1,525 1,557 -24.8% 2.1% 446 Health and Personal Care Stores 54 60 63 476 591 580 24.2% -1.9% 451 Sporting Goods / Hobby / Book/ Music Stores 23 17 18 101 60 67 -40.6% 11.7% 452 General Merchandise Stores 77 72 73 1,646 2,011 2,061 22.2% 2.5% 453 Miscellaneous Store Retailers 70 41 34 555 190 175 -65.8% -7.9% 454 Nonstore Retailers 20 13 19 201 107 135 -46.8% 26.2% 483 Water Transportation n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 485 Transit and Ground Passenger Transport 5 5 5 10 22 21 120.0% -4.5% 493 Warehousing and Storage 10 12 13 244 243 256 -0.4% 5.3% 511 Publishing Industries 9 6 7 158 125 142 -20.9% 13.6% 532 Rental and Leasing Services 23 22 19 163 114 122 -30.1% 7.0% 541 Professional and Technical Services 189 208 222 945 1,045 963 10.6% -7.8% 561 Administrative and Support Services 113 129 134 5,292 2,954 2,970 -44.2% 0.5% 712 Museums, Parks and Historical Sites * * * * * * * * 722 Food Services & Drinking Places 204 249 252 3,601 4,702 4,478 30.6% -4.8% 811 Repair and Maintenance 112 102 101 389 314 273 -19.3% -13.1%Source: Quarterly Census Employment and Wages* - Data are suppress due to confidentiality 18

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