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  • 1. Frame & Explain Using Quotations in Your Writing
  • 2. Select the quotes to use.
  • 3. Selecting Quotes • Choose the best examples to support your ideas. • Weak quotes lead to weak writing, so make sure your examples are strong!
  • 4. For example • “I did not fast. First of all, to please my father who had forbidden me to do so. And then, there was no longer any reason for me to fast. I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (69). • This quote is essential to my argument.
  • 5. Frame your quote.
  • 6. Framing • You can‟t just plot a quote in your paper. It must be “framed”.
  • 7. Provide Context One way Wiesel proved his faith was tested throughout the Holocaust was through the inner conflict he shared with us during his journey. When Yom Kippur came around, Elie struggled to decided whether or not to uphold the tradition of fasting. In the end, Wiesel decided, He writes, “I did not fast. First of all, to please my father who had forbidden me to do so. And then, there was no longer any reason for me to fast. I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69).
  • 8. Give Credit to the Source • Make sure your reader knows who created the quote (in speech or writing). • Avoid using “said.” It‟s old & tired. There are hundreds of other verbs that are more accurate. One way Wiesel proved his faith was tested throughout the Holocaust was through the inner conflict he shared with us during his journey. When Yom Kippur came around, Elie struggled to decided whether or not to uphold the tradition of fasting. In the end, Wiesel decided. He writes, “I did not fast. First of all, to please my father who had forbidden me to do so. And then, there was no longer any reason for me to fast. I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69).
  • 9. Explain the significance of the quote! He writes, “I did not fast. First of all, to please my father who had forbidden me to do so. And then, there was no longer any reason for me to fast. I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69). The presence of the inner conflict within Elie about whether or not to eat shows how his faith in God is changing. Ultimately, eating on Yom Kippur is a symbol of the blame he assigns to God, turning his back on Him in an act of revenge for his abandonment. The void he mentions is a symbol for the absence of God in his heart.
  • 10. Connect back to thesis statement • “… Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69). The presence of the inner conflict within Elie about whether or not to eat shows how his faith in God is changing. Ultimately, eating on Yom Kippur is a symbol of the blame he assigns to God, turning his back on Him in an act of revenge for his abandonment. The void he mentions is a symbol for the absence of God in his heart. This absence points to the fact that his faith is being tested, he‟s lost his trust in God, so his faith is on shaky ground.
  • 11. Provide an in-text citation. • Belongs directly after a quotation, at the end of a sentence. He writes, “I did not fast. First of all, to please my father who had forbidden me to do so. And then, there was no longer any reason for me to fast. I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69). The presence of the inner conflict within Elie about whether or not to eat shows how his faith in God is changing. Ultimately, eating on Yom Kippur is a symbol of the blame he assigns to God, turning his back on Him in an act of revenge for his abandonment. The void he mentions is a symbol for the absence of God in his heart.
  • 12. A Sample Paragraph One way Wiesel proved his faith was tested throughout the Holocaust was through the inner conflict he shared with us during his journey. When Yom Kippur came around, Elie struggled to decided whether or not to uphold the tradition of fasting. In the end, Wiesel decided, He writes, “I did not fast. First of all, to please my father who had forbidden me to do so. And then, there was no longer any reason for me to fast. I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69). The presence of the inner conflict within Elie about whether or not to eat shows how his faith in God is changing. Ultimately, eating on Yom Kippur is a symbol of the blame he assigns to God, turning his back on Him in an act of revenge for his abandonment. The void he mentions is a symbol for the absence of God in his heart. This absence points to the fact that his faith is being tested, he‟s lost his trust in God, so his faith is on shaky ground.
  • 13. There are rules, so get it right…
  • 14. If you introduce your quote with a compete sentence, • Use a colon before the quote. • Wiesel admitted the strength of his faith in the early pages of the memoir: “I was almost thirteen and deeply observant” (Wiesel 3).
  • 15. If you introduce your quote with an incomplete sentence, • Use a comma before the quote. • Early on, Wiesel admits, “I was almost thirteen and deeply observant” (Wiesel 3).
  • 16. If you’re quoting a quote, • Use single quotation marks within double quotation marks. • To suggest that God is dead, Wiesel comments, “„Where He is? This is where— hanging here from this gallows…‟” ‟”
  • 17. Ellipses •… • If you want to leave out material from within a quote, use ellipses. • Be certain you‟re not “cutting” essential parts of the quote. • Supporting Passages • “I did not fast.…I no longer accepted Gods‟ silence. As I swallowed my ration of soup, I turned that act into a symbol of rebellion, of protest against Him. And I nibbled on my crust of bread. Deep inside me, I felt a great void opening” (Wiesel 69).