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Darragh Coakley: From SMELearning towards SME 2.0
 

Darragh Coakley: From SMELearning towards SME 2.0

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  • Just want to talk a bit about competency framework as well because 2 are quite closely tied - especially if we want to practice what we preach.
  • The learning methodology should be considered in light of the competency framework and training material. I think it's applicable, because the 2 are going in parallel. We should also try to draw from the Competency framework to help develop the methodology for SME2 because the 2 are quite closely tied - especially if we want to “practice what we preach” RE: training.
  • So the learning methodology is based on the 3 steps:1) Methodology for SME trainings based on SME1 model – developed + Personal Research (Particularly around training for SMEs & web based training)2) Needs analysis - based on survey results – to be carried out by us based on survey results3) Elaboration of SME 2 competency framework – based on both of the above – somewhat developedThe final doc will also be updated with SME2 branding & layout. It will also be “leaner” – a more focused, more up to date version of the SME1 model (with a focus on the SME2 course)
  • Drawing from the SMELearning project, the main results from this project were: The index of innovative training practices in industrial SMEs. Strategic recommendations for the application of ICT in the training aimed at industrial SMEs. A guide for ICT application within European industrial SMEs.
  • There are 3 Main factors for consideration with training for SMEs:Environment (Cultural/ Management factors)Resources (Technical / IT setup)Pedagogy (Pedagogical approach)All of these also affect each other, as demonstrated by the diagram above
  • So this is the suggested planned breakdown for the SME 2 learning methodology, taking into account the training to be offered to SME2 participants, developed mainly from the SMELearning results and additional research. More information from the needs analysis and the competency framework will also need to be added to help develop this - in particular, the suggestions for section 5 - Training for SMEs - will require the results of the needs analysis and more information about the content of the courses and the most beneficial activities which SMEs should undertake. In addition, the results may also be informed by any decisions already made RE:WP3 & 4 – e.g.: the fidelity to the Tengen course development approach.
  • The first 2 steps of the learning methodology is to provide the SME with information. The first information item should be on innovative training – particularly working and methodological hypothesis for training in SMEs. This information could be made available as part of a “starter pack” offered to the SME or as part of the SME2 course.
  • The second information item should be information on the conceptual framework and a taxonomy of relevant terms for e-learning and SMEs – much of this information is already available from the SMELearning project but would need to be updated to include more Web2.0 terms and tools. This information could be made available as part of a “starter pack” offered to the SME or as part of the SME2 course.
  • The following steps of the learning methodology, after the first 2 “information” stages, are designed to help the SME to undertake steps to implement training. As covered later in this presentation, there are a number of activities which should be undertaken apart from simply making training available and expecting people to do it. These stages should be implemented ideally, before content development.The first of these steps is to evaluate the organization through the use a number of questionnaires. These questionnaires are based on the Kirkpatrick model and are aimed at managers, trainers and students – with one questionnaire adapted to each profile. The questionnaires are designed to find the key points in the areas of the SME environment, the motivation for training, existing training set-ups and learning processes and the intended results of the training action. The information gathered from these questionnaires is designed to help develop learning content and a learning methodology which will fit to the SME in question.
  • Rosenberg (2000) considers the “Four C’s for Success” - corporate-policy factors - very important for the success of an e-Learning project in an SME.These elements have to be clarified previously to a project in order to assure its success.Culture - An open learning cultureChampions - The manager support of the projectCommunications - The successful communication of the project and its advantages for the staffChange - A change process which integrates these factors of success into the further development of the organization and of the staff. These elements tie heavily into the use of the questionnaires to try to establish these elements prior to introducing training.
  • A recent study carried out by Cedefop and the European Commission shows that elearning has had a limited impact on SME’s in terms of those who use it and what it is used for, The use was almost always limited to managers and ICT based staff. The case studies carried out showed that in five European countries there were a number of factors decisive in influencing the development of ICT for learning in SME’s. The most significant were:The total lack of training culture within the SMELack of appropriate learning materialsThe attitude of individual managersLack of access to sufficient bandwidth to ensure high quality training.These are crucial elements for development within an SME
  • Another point of involvement of the questionnaire is in identifying Real Learning needs – especially for the development of the content – information here will be partly based on needs analysis. But another point of reference should come from the SME – so that content can be developed to suit the requirements of the SME
  • The next step is to determine the competice model to be used for the SME in question. Each competice model describes a learning strategy, conditions for success, comparison with «traditional» practice in adult training and the transfer to open and distance learning. To a large degree, this determines the level of communication with a tutor or instructor figure. This is to allow the SME to select the manner of training model that will best suit its culture, technical set-up, complexity of learning material and the time available for synchronous training sessions etc.
  • The competice models are an important point for SMEs as they introduce the concept of blended learning.Research has found that:- Blending works : This study adds to a growing consensus around the conclusion that the most effective type of instruction combines the online and face-to-face environments.- Self-directed online learning is not the best : Collaborative or instructor-directed online learning achieved results superior to those attained through independent, self-directed online learning, which may provide a partial explanation for why online learning has not proven to be a money-saver for cash-strapped educational institutions.
  • Rather than assuming that there should be a single style of offering training to users, the competice models would provide a means for SMEs to identify a programme for them which would best suit their culture, technical resources, etc. This is similar to companies offering different versions of products (particularly online services ) ranging from “basic” to “deluxe” versions. This is applicable to research undertaken by Means, B., Toyama, Y., Murphy, R., Bakia, M., Jones, K. (2010) and Bernard et. al (2004) and Zhao et. al (2005).
  • So SMELearningthere were 5 different learning competicemodels. The recommendation for SME2 would be to offer 3 different competice models for SME2 – tweaked more towards delivery for SMEs.
  • The next step is to provide examples of training which could be performed by SMEs in their own organisations, according to their own standards, setup, etc. Much of the information available here will be based on the course content and the means by which the course is delivered. I will return to this later on in the presentation.
  • The final step in helping SMEs to implement training will be in the provision of information for identifying, addressing and overcoming barriers to training in SMEs. Much of the information from this will be based on the Strategic Recommendations document from the SMELearning project.An important element of practically applying this information within an SME will involve the recommendations contained within eight advicesheets in the Strategic recommendation document - including:Introducing training to the SMEAdapting training to suit the needsof the SME Making training an investment fordevelopment Implementing suitable contentand resources Preparing the user for the trainingprocess How to implement the training andinnovation Making innovation operational atSME levelMaking innovation operational atthe SME’s local level
  • So, as described previously, the learning methodology is based on the 3 steps:1) Methodology for SME trainings based on SME1 model – developed + Personal Research (Particularly around training for SMEs & web based training)2) Needs analysis - based on survey results – to be carried out by us based on survey results3) Elaboration of SME 2 competency framework – based on both of the above – somewhat developed
  • As mentioned previously much of the information available here will be based on the course content and the means by which the course is delivered. For this, there are a number of questions which must be addressed:
  • How closely should the SME2 course remain to the Tengen training?Is the training platform for delivery agreed?How heavily should the results of the needs analysis tie into the SME2 course?Should the course be training the use of tools, or the use of theoretical information?In addition to this, I feel that there are a number of considerations which should be taken into account with regard to developing the training.
  • There should be a focus on small, micro-chunks of material, which should be easily accessible and should also be available as part of a larger course, but should also be available as stand-alone learning objects for a specific tool/ piece of knowledge – this in turn develops flexibility into the course structure – should we need to develop these items as stand alone learning items.
  • According to “Facilitating knowledge transfer to drive innovation im SMEs” by Ileana Hamburg, FH-Gelsenkirchen, Germany, social media based on Web 2.0 services i.e. media for social interaction offer the premises for a fast knowledge acquisition and support transforming learning in a continuous „life long process” also within the communities.” Web 2.0 tools should play an important role in the course content.
  • As noted by Cammy Bean (Accidental Instructional Designer, 2012) - “SME’s tend to avoid anything that will not grab attention immediately” – therefore, the SME2 course should avoid text-heavy information and should focus on the use of video and interactive media for the course.
  • According to “Facilitating knowledge transfer to drive innovation im SMEs” by Ileana Hamburg, FH-Gelsenkirchen, Germany: “Supporting learners’ communication includes assisting students in coping with the technology, providing multiple means of access, helping students to achieve text based communication skills, setting personal goals and priorities and dealing with conflict and tension.” It would be extremely important in the SME2 project to integrate learning as part of ongoing processes. This would involve the development of actual, real-life resources as course activities (e.g.: The user must create a facebook page for their organisation and create a vanity URL). The focus should be to provide the SME with a deliverable at the end of the training(SMEs could also develop internal processes as part of this exercise)
  • It is also suggested, for the sake of consistency, that the consortium develop and agree on a final template for course material, each course module and for the overall course (this will probably be covered in the Syllabus?).

Darragh Coakley: From SMELearning towards SME 2.0 Darragh Coakley: From SMELearning towards SME 2.0 Presentation Transcript

  • SME2 Meeting Friday 18th May Learning Methodology
  • SME2 Methodology “SME 2.0 consortium will establish online training for European Small and Medium Enterprises based on thetransferred methodology from SMELearning LdV project (smelearning.eu ), with strong focus on the special characteristics and needs of the SMEs.”
  • SME2Methodology
  • SME2 Methodology• Methodology for SME trainings based on SME1 model – developed o + Personal Research - developed• Needs analysis - based on survey results – to be carried out by us based on survey results• Elaborated SME 2 competency framework – based on both of the above – somewhat developed
  • SME2 Methodology• WP2: – Conceptual framework • Taxonomy – updated – Evaluation of the set up • Questionnaires • Guide for evaluating the problems, etc for defining methods – Competice models• WP3A: – Information on innovative training – Innovation in training for SMEs – The type of ICT used in training – NEEDS TO BE UPDATED – How to overcome barriers to the introduction into business of new training methods based on the ICT – Responses to ongoing questions on the use of ICT in training – How to remove obstacles linked to the implementation of innovative training?• WP3B: – The situation of SMEs – Implementing ICT models/ Competice description sheets
  • SME2 Methodology3 Main factors for consideration with training for SMEs:
  • SME2 Methodology Information for SMEs 1. SMEs & training • Information on innovative training • Innovation in training for SMEs 2. Conceptual framework and taxonomy for SME training SME Learning Methodology1. Evaluating & monitoring a SME for training • Evaluation of the training setup • Questionnaires for evaluating training • Guide for evaluating the problems, etc for defining methods2. Competice models for training • Competice models • Implementing ICT models3. Training Practices for SMEs • Item 1 (SME2 Module?) • Item 2 (SME2 Module?) • Item 3 (SME2 Module?) • Item 4 (SME2 Module?) 4. Strategic recommendations for e-learning for SMEs • How to overcome barriers to the introduction into business of new training methods based on the ICT • Responses to ongoing questions on the use of ICT in training • How to remove obstacles linked to the implementation of innovative training?
  • SME2 MethodologyInformation 1 - SMEs & Training • Information on innovative training • Innovation in training for SMEs
  • SME2 MethodologyInformation 2- Conceptual framework and taxonomy for SME training
  • SME2 MethodologyStep 1 - Evaluating & monitoring a SME for training• Evaluation of the training setup - Plan-Do-Check-Act” (PDCA)• Questionnaires for evaluating training• Guide for evaluating the problems, etc for defining methods
  • SME2 MethodologyENVIRONMENT Culture Champions Communications Change
  • SME2 Methodology• Vs the “4C’s” 1. The total lack of training culture within the SME 2. Lack of appropriate learning materials 3. The attitude of individual managers 4. Lack of access to sufficient bandwidth to ensure high quality training. * Study carried out by Cedefop and the European Commission
  • SME2 Methodology• Identify Real Learning Needs: – Very important point – especially for the development of the content – information here will be based on needs analysis.• Adapting instruction works: – Means work supports the thoughtful adaptation of instructional methods and materials to the online environment
  • SME2 MethodologyStep 2 - Competice models for training• Competice models• Implementing ICT models
  • SME2 Methodology• Blending works : – Growing consensus around the conclusion that the most effective type of instruction combines the online and face-to-face environments• Self-directed online learning is not the best : – Collaborative or instructor-directed online learning achieved results superior to those attained through independent, self-directed online learning
  • SME2 Methodology• Rather than 1 style for all, similar to SME1 - offer different models with different levels of contact and let the SME decide (and/ or suggestions from partners) what model is most suitable for them depending on availablity, etc.* According to 1 Means, B., Toyama, Y., Murphy, R., Bakia, M., Jones, K. (2010). Evaluation of evidence-based practices in online learning: A meta-analysis and review of online learning. Center for Technology in Learning, U.S. Department of Education* Backed up by Other meta-analyses which reach this conclusion are Bernard et. al (2004) and Zhao et. al (2005).
  • SME2 MethodologyStep 2 – Reduced Competice models for training
  • SME2 MethodologyStep 3 – Deliver training for SMEs• Deliver training and training practices toSMEs
  • SME2 MethodologyStep 4 - Strategic recommendations for e-learning for SMEs• How to overcome barriers to the introduction into business of new training methods based on the ICT• Responses to ongoing questions on the use of ICT in training• How to remove obstacles linked to the implementation of innovative training?
  • SME2 Methodology• Methodology for SME trainings based on SME1 model – developed o + Personal Research - developed• Needs analysis - based on survey results – to be carried out by us based on survey results• Elaboration of SME 2 competency framework – based on both of the above – somewhat developed
  • SME2 MethodologyStep 3 – Deliver training for SMEs• Deliver training and training practices toSMEs
  • SME2 Methodology• Closely linked to SME2 Course information• Connection/ Fidelity to Tengen training?• Training platform decided?• Focus of results analysis?• Training use of tools or theoretical information?
  • SME2 MethodologySuggestions:1) Focus on small, micro-chunks of material, easily accessible, available as part of the larger course, but also available as stand-alone learning objects for a specific tool/ piece of knowledge – in turn develops course structure
  • SME2 MethodologySuggestions:2) “Social media based on Web 2.0 services i.e. media for social interaction offer the premises for a fast knowledge acquisition and support transforming learning in a continuous „life long process” also within the communities.”* I Hamburg, FH-Gelsenkirchen, Germany (2010)
  • SME2 MethodologySuggestions:3) Focus on use of screencasting/ video/ conferencing for provision of content. “SME’s tend to avoid anything that will not grab attention immediately” * – e.g.: Text-heavy training*Bean C, Accidental Instructional Designer, 2012
  • SME2 MethodologySuggestions:4) Integrate learning as part of ongoing processes or even projects with a view to a deliverable at the end (SME could develop internal process as part of this exercise)“Supporting learners’ communication includes assisting students in coping with the technology, providing multiple means of access, helping students to achieve text based communication skills, setting personal goals and priorities and dealing with conflict and tension.” - * I Hamburg, FH-Gelsenkirchen, Germany (2010)
  • SME2 MethodologySuggestions:5) Provide template for video/ screencast material to provide consistency and develop a focus for informing SME learners.Suggested Items:• Introduction• Learning Objectives• Learning Objective 1• Learning Objective 2• Learning Objective 3• Key Points• Self-Assessment (Maybe a separate entity?)• Activity/ Applying Content (Could potentially be part of the LOs)
  • Thanks for your attention Questions/ Comments?