Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
CRJ-113 Chapter 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

CRJ-113 Chapter 1

878
views

Published on

Published in: Business, Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
878
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Lecture Notes: During this time, corrections originated to carry out punishment which had originally been reserved as a private matter between an offending party and a victim. Corrections grew from individual to group punishment, then from group punishment to legal codes and punishment applied by the country or state.
  • Lecture Notes: As time passed and the secular leaders (kings and other types of monarchs) became more powerful, they wanted to detach themselves from the divine legal order and its restrictions on their power. In the early 14th century, many scholars advocated the independence of the monarchy from the pope.
  • Lecture Notes: Transportation–remove offenders from society (17th and 18th centuries) Workhouse/Bridewell Corporal and capital punishment Gaols–jails holding defendants awaiting trial Fee system Discuss four sources of laws in the United States: Constitutions (state and federal) Statutes and codes (state and federal) Judicial decision Administrative agencies
  • Lecture Notes:
  • Lecture Notes: A philosophical shift away from punishment of the body, toward punishment of the soul or human spirit The passage of laws preventing imprisonment of anyone but criminals
  • Lecture Notes: Deterrence: The discouragement or prevention of crimes through the fear of punishment. Penance: Punishment is used to cause the offenders to reflect on their crimes, repent, and change.
  • Lecture Notes: Retaliation: Act designed to repay (as an injury) in kind, or to return like for like, especially “to get revenge.” Blood feud or vendetta: An often-prolonged series of retaliatory, vengeful, or hostile acts or exchange of such acts. Lex salica: The custom of atonement for wrongs against a victim by payment to appease the victim’s family. Wergild: The European word denoting lex salica. Friedensgeld: The practice of paying restitution for crime to both the victim and the Crown. Outlaw: Declared to be outside the law of the tribe (nation, family). Lex talionis: The act of repaying in kind, such as “an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth.”
  • Lecture Notes: Civil death: The status of a living person equivalent in its legal consequences to natural death; loss of all rights and powers as if dead. “ Get right with God:” Directive that the offender must make peace with God through repentance and atonement. Inquisition: A former Roman Catholic tribunal for the discovery and punishment of heresy; an investigation conducted with little regard for individual rights through a severe questioning. Corporal punishment: Any physical pain inflicted short of death; common methods include crucifixion, whipping, torture, mutilation, branding, and caning. Brank: A birdcage-like instrument placed on the offender’s head with sharp-edged iron plates that would cut tongues and mouths of the gossipers. Cat-o’-nine-tails: Torture device for whipping or flogging. Lex eterna: One of the major terms describing eternal law, intended for the common good. It cannot be changed by humans. Lex naturalis: Legal theory that there are laws that occur naturally and across all cultures.
  • Lecture Notes: Lex humana: Laws that are enacted by human beings. Criminology: Looks at the reasons for and consequences of crime. Mamertine prison: An early place of confinement in Rome using primitive dungeons built under the main sewer. Sanctuary: Asylum that placed the wrongdoer in seclusion or arrest in cities. Bridewell: A workhouse created for the employment and housing of London’s unemployed or underemployed working classes. Jail fever: Typhus frequently concentrated in places of detention that will cause large-scale death of inmates and local citizens. Cesare Beccaria: The founder of the Classical School of Criminology. Classical School: Approach to understanding crime and social policy for offenders.
  • Lecture Notes: Jeremy Bentham: Argued that the crime rate would go down if the amount of punishment were carefully calibrated to deter potential offenders and maximize pleasure. Hedonistic calculus: Jeremy Bentham’s argument that the main objective of an intelligent person is to maximize pleasure while minimizing pain; it was believed that individual’s behavior could be influenced in a scientific manner. John Howard: An English high sheriff who was so appalled by jail conditions that he undertook a crusade to improve places of detention. Workhouse: A house of correction for persons guilty of minor law violations; sometimes referred to as a “poorhouse.” Gaols: Places of confinement in England for persons held in lawful custody; specifically, such a place under the jurisdiction of a local government (as a county) for the confinement of persons awaiting trial or those convicted of minor crimes. Banishment: To remove by authority from a state or country; the sentence to cast out of a local residence or country due to criminal behavior on the offender’s part. Transportation: Legal sentence requiring the banishment of the offender to a different location; the act of transporting that offender to another country. Hulks: Abandoned or unusable transport ships anchored in rivers and harbors that confined criminal offenders.
  • Lecture Notes: Maison de Force: A Belgian workhouse for beggars and miscreants, designed to make a profit by an enforced pattern of hard work and both discipline and silence. An important rule: “If a man will not work, neither let him eat.” Hospice of San Michele: A corrections facility designed for incorrigible boys and youth, and included silence, large work areas, and separate sleeping cells. Both expiation and reform were intended goals. William Penn: Quaker leader who created the state of Pennsylvania and a system of justice that required compensation of victims and repentance to restore the offender to God’s grace. The Great Law: Body of laws of the Quakers that saw hard labor as a more effective punishment than death for crimes and one that demanded compensation to victims. Penitentiary: Originally a detention center in which inmates could do penance and repent or turn away from crime; now any larger penal institution for detention of inmates. Walnut Street Jail: First penitentiary created in Philadelphia by the Quakers. Pennsylvania system: The system of prison discipline using isolation or solitary confinement with both a work requirement and moral and religious instruction.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Criminal Justice Chapter 1 Early History(2000 B.C. to A.D. 1800) Class Name, Instructor Name Date, Semester
    • 2. CHAPTER AGENDA1.1 Summarize the Definition, Mission, and Role of Corrections1.2 Describe How Secular Law Emerged Summarize Early Responses to1.3 Crime Prior to the Development of Prisons1.4 Outline the Development of the Prison Summarize Sentencing Goals1.5 and Primary Punishment Philosophies1.6 Define Terms Related to the Introduction to Corrections © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 3. Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes1.1 Summarize the Definition, Mission, and Role of Corrections © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 4. .1 Corrections © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 5. .1 Mission © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 6. Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes1.2 Describe How Secular Law Emerged © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 7. .2 Secular Belief that Leaders Want to Detach Independence Law was from Divine of Monarchy Made in Legal Order from Pope Heaven and its Restrictions © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 8. Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes1.3 Summarize Early Responses to Crime Prior to the Development of Prisons © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 9. .3 Workhouse/Transportation Gaols Fee System Bridewell © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 10. Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes1.4 Outline the Development of the Prison © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 11. .4Development of the Prison William Penn The Walnut Street Quaker Pennsylvania Jail Reformer System © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 12. Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes1.5 Summarize Sentencing Goals and Primary Punishment Philosophies © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 13. Philosophy of Criminal Sentencing.5 Punishment Punishment of the Soul or of the Body Human Spirit © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 14. .5 Sentencing Goals Deterrence Penance © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 15. Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes1.6 Define Terms Related to the Introduction to Corrections © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 16. .6 Key Terms:Retaliation Blood Feud Vendetta Lex salica Wergild Friedensgeld Outlaw Lex talionis © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 17. .6 Key Terms: “Get Right with CorporalCivil Death Inquisition God” Punishment Cat-o’-nine- Brank Lex eterna Lex naturalis tails © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 18. .6 Key Terms: MamertineLex humana Criminology Sanctuary Prison Cesare Classical Bridewell Jail Fever Beccaria School © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 19. .6 Key Terms: Jeremy Hedonistic John Howard Workhouse Bentham Calculus Gaols Banishment Transportation Hulks © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 20. .6 Key Terms:Maison de Hospice of William Penn The Great Law Force San Michele Walnut Street PennsylvaniaPenitentiary Jail System © 2013 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved
    • 21. CHAPTER SUMMARY1.1 Summarize the Definition, Mission, and Role of Corrections1.2 Describe How Secular Law Emerged Summarize Early Responses to1.3 Crime Prior to the Development of Prisons1.4 Outline the Development of the Prison Summarize Sentencing Goals1.5 and Primary Punishment Philosophies1.6 Define Terms Related to the Introduction to Corrections © 2012 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc 2013 Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 • All Rights Reserved

    ×