World Class Energy Efficiency - Sweden leads the way

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Presentation by Jan Nordling IVA

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  • 7. (Click! Bild graf CO2 + GNP)   Stable economic growth and CO2 do not need to go hand in hand, it can definitly be the other way aroud that it stimulates economic growth and Sweden has the last couple of years had the most stable growth in Europé. Oil crises in the 70th   Thanks to efficiency measures (political abitions), transition to new energy sources and combined heat and power plants and high efficient district cooling, DHC has helped to reduce Sweden ’ s total carbon emissions by 20% in only two decades.
  • Den analys av hotbilden Globaliseringsrådet gjorde kan sammanfattas så här. Som ni ser finns en hel del utmaningar. Sverige är alltför beroende av ett fåtal stora företag. Kunskapsinnehållet är förhållandevis lågt och påfyllningen ”underifrån” med nya kunskapsintensiva företag är för dålig. Den privata tjänstesektorn är svag, och utbildningen visar tydliga kvalitetsproblem. Men jämfört med andra EU-länder har Sverige ett bra utgångsläge med sunda statsfinanser, stabila spelregler och låg korruption. När politiker i andra länder behöver fokusera på att klara av budgetunderskott kan vi fokusera på utveckling och innovation för framtida välstånd.
  • Consciousness (Not aware of it) – The stakeholders can’t act on something they don’t know exists. There has been a lot of energy efficiency done for several years but new generations and new technological solutions results in a continuous need for information and education. Policy: spread knowledge with brochures, web sites, seminars, education and also finance channels for dissemination f.ex. local energy and climate advisors in municipalities and regional energy offices. Knowledge (Too complicated) – When you know what to do and the measures are complicated you might need technical and practical support. Policy: produce manuals, labelling, calculation tools, templates and standardisation to help the person to accomplish the measure. Attitude (Don’t believe in it)) – It’s not enough to be aware and to know how to do something. The decision maker also must see the benefit. Policy: finance improved basis for decisions to give arguments and to convince each decision maker that the measure works. Follow up and evaluation of both good and bad examples to be financed. Tests of products give possibilities to further develop labelling as a tool. Intention (Don’t want to) – Policy: Media can be used to focus on good examples. Sometimes honour and fame can be a good method to convince people to make energy efficient decisions. (Even shame and degradation can give results). Even bad results, f.ex. published test results, often push forward a quick technology development for products with the worst result. Action (Not allowed to) – Even participants who knows, are convinced, and want to accomplish measures can meet barriers like they don’t have the mandate to decide. The right level for decision is not always easy to reach. Policy: Tools adjusted for management level can be developed. Tax issues are always placed in the highest level of a company (f.ex – the Swedish program PFE). STEM also work with legislation both national and at EU level. Continue behaviour (Can’t manage /don’t dare) – It can be demanding to continuously make the energy efficiency decisions. Policy: finance parts of networks. Energy management system, purchase and planning routines are useful tools to maintain energy consideration in the daily decision making. Besides the market information failures the market has not succeeded in providing enough research, technology development or innovation within the area of energy efficiency. Technology procurement is a successful method to develop appliances that the buyers request.
  • World Class Energy Efficiency - Sweden leads the way

    1. 1. World Class Energy Efficiency - Swedens´s Way to StayAt The TopJan NordlingProject Manager, An Energy Efficient Society2013-05-31
    2. 2. EU’s Energy policy3EfficiencyEnergyRenewables Security of SupplyEcodesignRenewables Directive Energy InfrastructureLabellingBuildings DirectiveEnergy InfrastructureEnergy Efficiency Directive
    3. 3. Swedish and EU targets in comparison2016 Sweden EUEnergy Efficiency 9% 9%2020Renewable energy 50% 20%Transport (renewable energy) 10% 10%Energy Efficiency 20% 20%Energy efficient buildings 20%CO2 40% 20 (30)%2030Vehicle Fleet Fossil independent(Vision)2050Energy efficient buildings 50%Greenhouse gases No net emissions(Vision)
    4. 4. YEAR Energy supply Final energy consumptionSector independent Sector independent Buildings2010 6,5% (24,0 TWh) energysavings compared to average2001-20052016 9 % (33,2 TWh) energy savingscompared to average 2001-20052020 -20 % energy intensity(kWh/SEK) compared to 2008years level-20 % (kWh per heated areaunit, m2) compared to 1995years level2050 -50 % (kWh per heated areaunit, m2) compared to 1995years levelExplanations:Energy Intensity is specific energy consumption such as [energy usage]/BNP or [energy usage]/[heatedarea]Energy Saving is reduced energy consumptionEnergy Efficiency is reduction of energy consumption maintaining the same level of usabilityEnergy efficiency house keeping is the sum of energy efficiency and energy saving
    5. 5. otal energy supply in Sweden 1970-2010, in TWhTotal energy supply in Sweden 1970-2010 in TWh
    6. 6. Final energy use in the residential and service sector, 1970–2010, TWhFinal energy use in the residential and service sector1970-2010,TWh
    7. 7. Electricity use in the residential sector,1970-2010,TWh
    8. 8. 01002003004001970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050Electrical energy-20%-50%FuelskWh/m2Target for buildings in Sweden
    9. 9. Total energy use in Buildings (temperature corrected energy usage for heating and hotwater usage), kWh/m2, 1995–2009                          
    10. 10. EU’s Energy policy11EfficiencyEnergyRenewables Security of SupplyEcodesignRenewables Directive Energy InfrastructureLabellingBuildings DirectiveEnergy InfrastructureEnergy Efficiency Directive
    11. 11. • Each Member State needs to publish a long-term nationalinvestment strategy for the residential and commercial buildingsector, both public and private.• 3% annual renovation target for buildings owned by the centralgovernment.• Energy retailers and distributors have to achieve a cumulativeenergy savings target of 1.5% annually among their end-users from2014 until 2020.• Large enterprises are required to undergo at least every four yearsan energy audit.• Smart metering.• Billing and consumer information.• Cogeneration and efficient district heating and cooling.• Energy Efficiency National Fund, Financing and Technical Support.
    12. 12. Vision for an energy-efficient society- IVA launched a major project on a ‘Vision for an energy-efficient society’ inSweden.- The project evaluates the main challenges and determines concretemeasures to improve energy efficiency in various sectors helping toachieve the environment and energy targets and an improvedcompetitiveness of Swedish industry.- Overall goal is to achieve an50% energy efficiencyimprovement in Sweden by 2050.
    13. 13. The project shall:- Identify opportunities and obstacles, and suggest concreteactions to bring about change in different sectors.- Identify new business models and business opportunities thatstimulate energy efficiency and suggest concrete actions..- Identify opportunities for energy efficiency through smart energysystems and suggest concrete actions.- Create a broader perception of the term ’energy efficiency’.- Compare with international experience and highlight goodexamples of energy efficiency.Projects goals
    14. 14. Pre-projects, staffingof project controlgroup, workinggroups and expertsPre-projects, staffingof project controlgroup, workinggroups and expertsProject Control Group 2012-2014Project Control Group 2012-2014PolicyPolicyQ1 2014Q3 2013Q1 2013Q3 2012Q1 2012Q3 2011Synthesis report and final seminarSynthesis report and final seminarEvaluation of the projectEvaluation of the projectCommunication, sub- and synthesis reportsCommunication, sub- and synthesis reportsProject processbuildingsbuildingsChairman,project leaderindustryindustryChairman,project leadertransporttransportChairman,project leaderforestry and agricultureforestry and agricultureChairman,project leaderthe service sectorthe service sectorChairman,project leadersmart energy systemssmart energy systemsChairman,project leaderbusiness opportunities & business modellsbusiness opportunities & business modellsChairman,project leaderGathering of data,analysis andpresentation ofexperiences fromother nordiccountries, NorthernEuropé andInternationally.Gathering of data,analysis andpresentation ofexperiences fromother nordiccountries, NorthernEuropé andInternationally.
    15. 15. Chair man, project leaderChair man, project leaderProject organisation and reportingProject Control Group 2012-2014Project Control Group 2012-2014Pre-projects, staffingof project controlgroup, workinggroups and expertsPre-projects, staffingof project controlgroup, workinggroups and expertsGathering of data,analysis andpresentation ofexperiences fromother nordiccountries, NorthernEuropé andInternationally.Gathering of data,analysis andpresentation ofexperiences fromother nordiccountries, NorthernEuropé andInternationally.pågårServicesectorServicesectorForestryandAgricultureForestryandAgricultureTransportTransportIndustryIndustryChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderPolicySmart Energy SystemsBusiness modells andbusiness opportunitiesChair man, project leaderChair man, project leaderProject leaderProject leaderBuildingsBuildingsChair man,projectleaderChair man,projectleaderProject leadingProject leading CommunicationCommunication Evaluationof projectsEvaluationof projects
    16. 16. Recommendations to the various real estate sector decision-makers• Stricter construction regulations for renovation and newconstruction• Adaptation of preservation standards• More stringent energy-use documentation requirements• Re-evaluate rent control• An analysis of credit risk insurance for energy efficiencyimprovements• Dissemination of information and experience throughdemonstration projects• National competence improvement in energy efficientconstruction• Set up a renovation centre• R&D programmes in energy efficiency in buildings
    17. 17. -Tests of products-Good exemples-Follow up/evaluationArgumentsArgumentsAttitude-Networks-Energy Managementsystem-Purchase routines-Planning routinesCooperationMutualSupportCooperationMutualSupportContinueBehavior-Information-Education-AdvicesAwarenessAwarenessConsciousnessMarket failures-Manuals-Labelling-Calculationtools-Templates-StandardsTecnologicalPracticalsupportTecnologicalPracticalsupportKnowledge- Press- Testresults- BrandingInspirationHonor andFame(Shame anddegradation)InspirationHonor andFame(Shame anddegradation)Intention-”Tax issue”-Tools forManagement- RegulationsRaise issueto the levelWhereProductionbudgetandinvestmentbudgetmeetRaise issueto the levelWhereProductionbudgetandinvestmentbudgetmeetAction
    18. 18. The centrally produced district cooling can reach 5-10 times higherenergy-efficiency than local electricity-driven equipment.District Cooling / SWAC ?“The main idea of District Cooling/SWAC (Sea Water Air Conditioning) is to use localsources for cooling that otherwise would be wasted or not used, in order to offer thelocal market a competitive and high-efficient alternative to the traditional coolingsolutions.”
    19. 19. District Cooling in Sweden21Supply, GWhGrid length, km
    20. 20. World Class Energy Efficiency - Swedens´s Way to StayAt The TopJan NordlingProject Manager, An Energy Efficient Society2013-05-31

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