What is ud   demographics-w-notes - adopted for dis stud class
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

What is ud demographics-w-notes - adopted for dis stud class

on

  • 307 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
307
Views on SlideShare
307
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Give examples
  • Accessibility
  • Universal Design
  • In addition to persons with disabilities who are the most likely :Other consumer groups are also at risk. They are—Individuals 65+ years oldConsumers living in low-bandwidth information infrastructuresPeople who never learned to readUsers of English as a Second Language (ESL)Tourists and people living in multilingual societiesConsumers living in high-density populations
  • Perhaps most key findingDesigning with access in mind can significantly increase the size of targeted markets for electronic and information technology (E&IT).Provides business incentive[skip]Good business practice dictates that designers and engineers avoid unintentionally excluding large populations of consumers from accessing and using the E&IT they develop and manufacture. People with disabilities are at a high risk of exclusion. Other consumer groups are also at risk. They are—Individuals 65+ years oldConsumers living in low-bandwidth information infrastructuresPeople who never learned to readUsers of English as a Second Language (ESL)Tourists and people living in multilingual societiesConsumers living in high-density populations
  • Noisy room, let’s say a bar – hearing is affected – captioning allows people to both talk and provides a different method to access audio.Stroller, bicycle – ability to climb or move different height levels is affectedDriving – hands and eyes are busy with other tasks – voice output and voice input
  • In 1997, North Carolina State University's Center for Universal Design documented and published seven Principles of Universal Design (1997):Equitable Use: The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.Flexibility in Use: The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.Simple and Intuitive Use: Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user's experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level.Perceptible Information: The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user's sensory abilities.Tolerance for Error: The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.Low Physical Effort: The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue.Size and Space for Approach and Use: Appropriate size and space are provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use, regardless of the user's body size, posture, or mobility.A much greater awareness of disabilities has evolved in the last century, in part as a result of a significant increase in the human lifespan. The general population has had greater exposure to human limitation as the people around them have aged and developed limitations, while at the same time living outside institutions and becoming more independent. This exposure has increased awareness of limitations that can impede the average individual and has led to design changes in products to help overcome these limitations. Initially, these design changes were implemented as special features that added to the cost and stood out as features for people with special needs. Over time, designers began to recognize that many design changes could be made on a larger scale, reducing the cost and benefiting a larger portion of the population (Center for Universal Design, n.d.). Research led to the formulation of design principles that describe the objectives of UD.
  • Equitable Use: The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.Flexibility in Use: The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.Simple and Intuitive Use: Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user's experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level.Perceptible Information: The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user's sensory abilities.Tolerance for Error: The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.Low Physical Effort: The design can be used efficiently and comfortably and with a minimum of fatigue.Size and Space for Approach and Use: Appropriate size and space are provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use, regardless of the user's body size, posture, or mobility.I would advise you to memorize these 7 principles – -we’ll be coming back to them repeatedly (and we will likely have a quiz on them – that’s a hint)
  • Yellow highlight from last slide is what I’m getting at with this picture. Accessibility without the UD concept leads to separate design.
  • Here’s an example of accessibility– a ramp added onto the original design – obviously not part of the original structure.Is it Equitable – somewhat – someone with a wheelchair or walker or other type of mobility impairment could now more easier get into the house, especially the wheelchair userBut for someone using crutches it could be more difficult because of the angle of the ramp-It could make it more convenient for anyone carrying heavy objects or groceries into the house or rolling a stroller.Obviously, it’s not fully universal, and it definitely advertises that a person who uses a wheelchairresides in the house. Clearly it’s not esthetically pleasing - a non-wheelchair user would probably want to remove the ramp which is an eyesore.[next slide]
  • Here’s an example of a house that appears to have been designed for accessibility from the outset, at least in terms of the design of the main entrance.-Clearly, it offers equitable and flexible use – anyone with a mobility impairment or -Moving objects on rollers would find this easier access than the ramp or steps shown in the previous picture.-It is also inarguably involves less physical effort – another one of our 7 principles-Think about the last principle – “size and space for approach and Use” – does it meet that principle (rhetorical question)It’s universality is demonstrated in that anyone could find use out of this type of design a non-wheelchair user would not look at this house and think, “I need to build some steps or I have to change that entrance”
  • It’s difficult to see the front entrances of these houses - but this appears to be a neighborhood designed with UD principles
  • Moving away from architectural elements to physical objects,this object exemplifies issues with hand dexterity and physical manipulationissues that are more applicable to web accessibilityIt also seems to incorporate the principles under discussionEquitable – someone without fine finger movement and only gross hand movement -- could operate this faucet-it’s simple and intuitive, appears to require low physical effort- Appears safe – curved designAs a thought experiment – think about how someone with a dexterity limitation might have problems accessing a web page. How would they use the mouse. It would likely be important for that person to be ableto use the keyboard – the tab key and enter key in particular – to move through the page and access controlson a web page.
  • Again, here’s a cue that falls into a different categorya device or interface that uses color to convey function and operationThis could be useful for someone with either a visual or cognitive impairment – or for anyone(I don’t know how many of you have used the RTD kiosks but I’ve almost missed a few flights trying to figure out how to pay for parking)The distinct colors here indicate both separate functions and their order. Again – let’s consider our 7 principles, do they apply (simply read list above – blue items hard to tell)
  • Benefits of Web Standards & UD approach:Allows you to approach accessible design with the wholistic concept of excellent design.Designing with web standards promotes accessibility, - higher ranking on search engines & lower costs for development, and faster loading of web pages (& lower costs for hardware).Design that is not only accessible but usable. That is universal in that it not only is usable by persons with disabilities but by mobile devices, by cell phones and by slow internet access.To understand this, we need to review the history of Web browsers:Web standards project began in 1998. Before that time, each browser used proprietary mark-up language or html.So web designers would have to create different code segments for each browser.25% of development time was spent addressing work-arounds for browser incompatibility.Because content & layout combined unlike when we use CSS with structure xhtml. Html files wound up being 60% larger than necessary, requiring longer time to load and requiring larger space on servers, thus more expensive equipment costs. Designing with web standards not only improves the performance of your site and lowers costs but makes it more accessible to ATWhen we use CSS, content can be displayed in a verient of different ways more easily. Using structured markup such as headers to logically divinde up a page not only makes it easier for screenreaders to nvigate a page, it makes it easier for search engines such as google to find.
  • Html 4.0 – first web standard for htmlXhtml 1.0Benefits of Web Standards & UD approach:Allows you to approach accessible design with the wholistic concept of excellent design.
  • Benefits of Web Standards & UD approach:Allows you to approach accessible design with the wholistic concept of excellent design.Designing with web standards promotes accessibility, - higher ranking on search engines & lower costs for development, and faster loading of web pages (& lower costs for hardware).Design that is not only accessible but usable. That is universal in that it not only is usable by persons with disabilities but by mobile devices, by cell phones and by slow internet access.To understand this, we need to review the history of Web browsers:Web standards project began in 1998. Before that time, each browser used proprietary mark-up language or html.So web designers would have to create different code segments for each browser.25% of development time was spent addressing work-arounds for browser incompatibility.Because content & layout combined unlike when we use CSS with structure xhtml. Html files wound up being 60% larger than necessary, requiring longer time to load and requiring larger space on servers, thus more expensive equipment costs. Designing with web standards not only improves the performance of your site and lowers costs but makes it more accessible to ATWhen we use CSS, content can be displayed in a verient of different ways more easily. Using structured markup such as headers to logically divinde up a page not only makes it easier for screenreaders to nvigate a page, it makes it easier for search engines such as google to find.
  • I’m to briefly touch on demographics in the next slide – mostly as a preparation for the assignment due this Friday – the one on demographics. WFirst, I just want to bring back what we’ve been discussing to the user. To design for uniiversal design, for the broad range of users, we have think about our usersWhen we design, do we consider the user, or do we simply create what we think looks niceOr if we consider a users, is it only a user like ourselfs – use of two hands, the good vision and hearing of a typical 20-year old, English speaker, a desktop/laptop user-or are we considering a user who can’t use a mouse, who can’t see the screen-are we thinking about the iphone or droid user, - may of the issues for the mobile user and the person with disabilities intersect - have you ever tried to access the nytimes site on your mobile device without the mobile app - think about how the features that make a mobile app easier for you to use might make it more easy for someone with dexterity or vision problems to access

What is ud demographics-w-notes - adopted for dis stud class Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Universal Design – An Overview Introduction Howard Kramer – hkramer@colorado.edu www.accessinghigherground.org Slides available at: slideshare.org/hkramer99
  • 2. Powerpoint Posted at:http://slideshare.com/hkramer99 and on D2L
  • 3. Today’s Outline What is Universal Design? What are its benefits? What factors are driving the interest and implementation of Universal Design? Real world examples of UD
  • 4. Key ConceptUser Centered Design How does it relate to UD?
  • 5. Universal Design – Origins & Definition What is Universal Design?  Universal design is the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. – Ron Mace, Architect, Product Designer, Educator
  • 6. UD Defined – variations on a theme …[T]he practice of designing products or environments that can be effectively and efficiently used by people with a wide range of abilities operating in a wide range of situations (Vanderheiden, 1997, p. 2014). …[B]uilding products that are robust and accommodating. Universal designs take account of differences in sight, hearing, mobility, speech, and cognition. Universal design helps not only people with disabilities, but also any of us when we’re tired, busy, or juggling many tasks (Francik, 1996).
  • 7. UD Defined – variations on a theme …[T]he design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. The intent of universal design is to simplify life for everyone by making products, communications, and the built environment more usable by as many people as possible at little or no extra cost. Universal design benefits people of all ages and abilities (Center for Universal Design, n.d.).
  • 8. Beyond the Physical Environment Universal Design for Digital Media  Text equivalents for graphics  Resizable font, adequate contrast, user-controllable styles  Captioning for multimedia  Clear and consistent navigation Universal Design for Learning  Multiple means of representation  Multiple means of action & expression  Multiple means of engagement
  • 9. Universal Design vs. Accessibility Universal design, or design for inclusion, is a process to ensure that E&IT is inclusive, accessible, and usable by everyone, including people with disabilities. Accessible design is a step forward when developing E&IT products, but it tends to lead to technologies that will be used separately, or in addition to, the main E&IT product, which diminishes the effectiveness of designing for all.*From “Design for Inclusion: Creating a New Marketplace.”National Council on Disability (2004)
  • 10. Picture from IDeA Center – the Goals of UDhttp://udeworld.com/dissemination/presentations.html
  • 11. From the IDeA Center – The Goals of UDhttp://udeworld.com/dissemination/presentations.html
  • 12. Who is our Audience* People with disabilities are at a high risk of exclusion. Other consumer groups are also at risk. They are—  Individuals 65+ years old  Consumers living in low-bandwidth information infrastructures  People who never learned to read  Users of English as a Second Language (ESL)  Tourists and people living in multilingual societies  Consumers living in high-density populations*From “Design for Inclusion: Creating a New Marketplace.”National Council on Disability (2004)
  • 13. NCD Report – Key Finding Designing with access in mind can significantly increase the size of targeted markets for electronic and information technology (E&IT).
  • 14. “Situational Disability”Captioning in Stroller at Driving noisy room curbcut
  • 15. 7 Principles of Universal Design
  • 16. 7 Principles of Universal Design Equitable Use Flexibility in Use Simple and Intuitive Use Perceptible Information Tolerance for Error Low Physical Effort Size and Space for Approach and Use
  • 17. Universal Design Examples in the physical environment  Avoid stairs  Split level floors, sunken surfaces
  • 18. Picture from IDeA Center – the Goals of UDhttp://udeworld.com/dissemination/presentations.html
  • 19. From the IDeA Center – The Goals of UDhttp://udeworld.com/dissemination/presentations.html
  • 20. From the IDeA Center – The Goals of UDhttp://udeworld.com/dissemination/presentations.html
  • 21. CurblessShowers
  • 22.  The closed fist test.
  • 23. Visual Cues  Equitable  Flexible  Simple & Intuitive  Perceptible  Tolerance for error  Low physical effort  Size & space appropriate
  • 24. The Benefits UD Reach a wider audience Prevents segregation of users to different products, environments and services Make your products, environments and services more usable for everyone and thus more effective Allows access to global markets Encourages user-centered design which leads to better designed products Makes your products more universal & thus more valuable Can promote the development of innovative technologies
  • 25. The Semantic Web – Definitions Semantics (from Greek sēmantiká, neuter plural of sēmantikós - signifier)[1][2] is the study of meaning. It focuses on the relation between signifiers, such as words, phrases, signs and symbols, and what they stand for, their denotata.1 The Semantic Web describes the relationships between things (like A is a part of B and Y is a member of Z) and the properties of things (like size, weight, age, and price)2 1 Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantics 2 http://www.w3schools.com/web/web_semantic.asp
  • 26. http://www.colorado.edu/ODECE/UDAC/physics%20page-2.htm
  • 27. The Benefits of Web Standards Makes it easier for people & search engines to find your content – (including AT users) Separating structure and behavior makes your site easier and less expensive to develop & test. (And much easier to update). Makes your site lighter (smaller file size) Semantic markup makes your site more accessible to different kinds of browsers and devices, incl. mobile devices and AT Designing with standards in ensures that your site is forward compatible.
  • 28. What’s Driving Interest in UD Access as a civil right  Section 508 of Rehab. Act.  ADA  International Laws Demographics  1 in 5 people in the U.S. has a disability  1 in 10 have a severe disability  2003 – 36 million aged 65+ in U.S. (about 12% of pop.)  50% have disability  2030 – 70 million 65+ (20% of pop.) Globalization | Emerging Markets  Tourism | immigration | globalization  More non-English or non-readers
  • 29. Demographics – who is our audience? Do we design with  Non-mouse user the user in mind? If so, who is our  Screen Reader (Blind) “user.” user Use of two hands, the  Screen enlargement vision and hearing of (low vision) a typical 20-year old  Deaf user English speaking  iPhone user (or other Desktop/laptop user mobile browsing device)
  • 30. Zeldman – “the blind billionaire” Google and other search engines are, in effect, “blind users.”  Structure  Text/semantics
  • 31. Curriculum  Chisholm, Wendy; May, Matt.Materials Universal Design for Web Applications  Zeldman, Jeffrey. Designing with Web Standards (3rd Edition)  Shea & Holzschlag. The Zen of CSS Design: Visual Enlightenment for the Web.  Norman, David A. The Design of Everyday Things (2002).  Cooper, Alan; Reimann Robert M. About Face 2.0: The Essentials of Interaction Design (2003)
  • 32. Evaluation & Remediation Tools Wave (Toolbar) – wave.webaim.org Functional Accessibility Evaluator 1.1  https://addons.mozilla.org/en- US/firefox/addon/accessibility-evaluation- toolb/ Achecker –  http://achecker.ca/ Web Dev’l Toolbar  https://addons.mozilla.org/en- US/firefox/addon/web-developer/
  • 33. Accessing Higher Ground Conference Accessible Media, Web & Technology November 12 - 16, 2012 Hands-on sessions on Web Access, Assistive Technology Upcoming teleconferences Can purchase audio dvd of proceedings & access materials & handouts online Westin Hotel - between Boulder & Denver www.colorado.edu/ATconference