CRCT Review – Explain the significance of the following events: 1)  Battle of Kettle Creek 2)  Battle of Bloody Marsh 3)  ...
The Antebellum South Special Thanks to Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley HS  Chappaqua, NY
Early Emancipation in the North
Missouri Compromise, 1820
Antebellum Southern Society
Characteristics of the Antebellum South <ul><li>Primarily agrarian </li></ul><ul><li>Economic power shifted from the  “upp...
Antebellum Social Ladder Planters, bankers, lawyers, and merchants Yeoman farmers Poor whites Free blacks Black slaves
Yeoman Farmer’s Dogtrot Cabin
Slaves posing in front of their cabin on a Southern plantation.
Southern Society (1850) “ Slavocracy” [plantation owners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers] 6,000,000 Black Freemen ...
Georgian Society (1850) “ Slavocracy” [plantation owners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers] 600,000 Black Freemen Bl...
Southern Population (1860)
Antebellum Southern Economy
Graniteville Textile Co. Founded in 1845, it was the South’s first attempt at industrialization in Richmond, VA
Southern Agriculture
Slaves Picking Cotton on a Plantation
Slaves Using the Cotton Gin
The Growth of King Cotton 1820 1860
King Cotton in Georgia Late 1700s – Sea Island Cotton 1793 – Eli Whitney and the Cotton Gin Short-fiber variety grows inla...
Value of Cotton Exports  As % of All US Exports
“ Hauling the Whole Week’s Pickings” William Henry Brown, 1842
Antebellum Southern Plantation Life
Tara  – Plantation Reality or Myth? Hollywood’s Version?
Jarrell Plantation -  Reality Jones County, GA Version
Life of a Planter <ul><li>Successful Plantation required hard work </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum of 20 field slaves </li></ul>...
Slave-Owning Population (1850)
Slave-Owning Families (1850)
A Real Georgia Plantation
Slaves posing in front of their cabin on a Southern plantation.
The Southern “Belle”
The Privileged Class… <ul><li>Elite of Georgian society </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoyed a comfortable life </li></ul><ul><li>* b...
Scarlet and Mammie (Hollywood Again!)
A Real Mammie & Her Charge
The Ledger of John White <ul><li>Matilda Selby, 9, $400.00 sold to Mr. Covington,  St. Louis, $425.00  </li></ul><ul><li>B...
Antebellum Southern Society Social Change
Education <ul><li>Legislature called for schools in each county, but did not fund </li></ul><ul><li>Most Georgians believe...
Old Field School
Higher Education <ul><li>1785 The General Assembly chartered The University of Georgia (first classes 1801) </li></ul><ul>...
The University of Georgia
Wesleyan College - Macon
Religion <ul><li>Early Protestant – Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Lutheran, Moravian, and Baptist </li></ul><ul><li>Early 18...
Southern Slave Church
Georgian Social Reform <ul><li>Began to deal with criminals and needy in a more humane approach </li></ul><ul><li>Abolishe...
Georgia Academy for the Blind
Georgia Lunatic Asylum
Ticket Out the Door  – Which compromise was the best for the nation?  The worst?
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Antebellum southrevised

  1. 1. CRCT Review – Explain the significance of the following events: 1) Battle of Kettle Creek 2) Battle of Bloody Marsh 3) Proclamation of 1763  
  2. 2. The Antebellum South Special Thanks to Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley HS Chappaqua, NY
  3. 3. Early Emancipation in the North
  4. 4. Missouri Compromise, 1820
  5. 5. Antebellum Southern Society
  6. 6. Characteristics of the Antebellum South <ul><li>Primarily agrarian </li></ul><ul><li>Economic power shifted from the “upper South” to the “lower South” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Cotton Is King!” * 1860--> 5 mil. bales a yr (57% of total US exports) </li></ul><ul><li>Very slow development of industry </li></ul><ul><li>Rudimentary financial system </li></ul><ul><li>Developing transportation system </li></ul>
  7. 7. Antebellum Social Ladder Planters, bankers, lawyers, and merchants Yeoman farmers Poor whites Free blacks Black slaves
  8. 8. Yeoman Farmer’s Dogtrot Cabin
  9. 9. Slaves posing in front of their cabin on a Southern plantation.
  10. 10. Southern Society (1850) “ Slavocracy” [plantation owners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers] 6,000,000 Black Freemen Black Slaves 3,200,000 250,000 Total US Population --> 23,000,000 [9,250,000 in the South = 40%]
  11. 11. Georgian Society (1850) “ Slavocracy” [plantation owners] The “Plain Folk” [white yeoman farmers] 600,000 Black Freemen Black Slaves 381,600 3,500 Total US Population --> 23,000,000 [985,100 in Georgia = 4.3%]
  12. 12. Southern Population (1860)
  13. 13. Antebellum Southern Economy
  14. 14. Graniteville Textile Co. Founded in 1845, it was the South’s first attempt at industrialization in Richmond, VA
  15. 15. Southern Agriculture
  16. 16. Slaves Picking Cotton on a Plantation
  17. 17. Slaves Using the Cotton Gin
  18. 18. The Growth of King Cotton 1820 1860
  19. 19. King Cotton in Georgia Late 1700s – Sea Island Cotton 1793 – Eli Whitney and the Cotton Gin Short-fiber variety grows inland Georgia’s Piedmont and Coastal Plain ideal Georgia’s Fall Line attracted planters – fast moving water could power cotton gins, textile mills, and factories 1820s – Steamboats and 1840s – Railroad By 1850 “Empire State of the South”
  20. 20. Value of Cotton Exports As % of All US Exports
  21. 21. “ Hauling the Whole Week’s Pickings” William Henry Brown, 1842
  22. 22. Antebellum Southern Plantation Life
  23. 23. Tara – Plantation Reality or Myth? Hollywood’s Version?
  24. 24. Jarrell Plantation - Reality Jones County, GA Version
  25. 25. Life of a Planter <ul><li>Successful Plantation required hard work </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum of 20 field slaves </li></ul><ul><li>Often used overseers or trusted slaves to assist in running the operation </li></ul><ul><li>Typical plantation home - plain, unpainted, and modestly furnished </li></ul><ul><li>The wife often oversaw day-to-day needs </li></ul><ul><li>*food, clothing, and health needs of family and slaves </li></ul>
  26. 26. Slave-Owning Population (1850)
  27. 27. Slave-Owning Families (1850)
  28. 28. A Real Georgia Plantation
  29. 29. Slaves posing in front of their cabin on a Southern plantation.
  30. 30. The Southern “Belle”
  31. 31. The Privileged Class… <ul><li>Elite of Georgian society </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoyed a comfortable life </li></ul><ul><li>* barbecues and political gatherings, church functions, frequent visitors, riding , hunting and traveling abroad </li></ul><ul><li>With a successful plantation, planters could spend time on political office </li></ul><ul><li>Many prided themselves on an extensive library </li></ul><ul><li>Young sent to private schools close to home </li></ul><ul><li>Sons often sent to the North for education and daughters to female seminaries </li></ul>
  32. 32. Scarlet and Mammie (Hollywood Again!)
  33. 33. A Real Mammie & Her Charge
  34. 34. The Ledger of John White <ul><li>Matilda Selby, 9, $400.00 sold to Mr. Covington, St. Louis, $425.00 </li></ul><ul><li>Brooks Selby, 19, $750.00 Left at Home – Crazy </li></ul><ul><li>Fred McAfee, 22, $800.00 Sold to Pepidal, Donaldsonville, $1200.00 </li></ul><ul><li>Howard Barnett, 25, $750.00 Ranaway. Sold out of jail, $540.00 </li></ul><ul><li>Harriett Barnett, 17, $550.00 Sold to Davenport and Jones, Lafourche, $900.00 </li></ul>
  35. 35. Antebellum Southern Society Social Change
  36. 36. Education <ul><li>Legislature called for schools in each county, but did not fund </li></ul><ul><li>Most Georgians believed education best left to the family, not the government </li></ul><ul><li>“ poor school funds” – many too proud to send their children </li></ul><ul><li>“ old field schools” – rural, one-room schools often built in old cotton fields </li></ul><ul><li>As late as 1850 – 1 in 5 white adults were illiterate </li></ul><ul><li>Higher education fared much better… </li></ul>
  37. 37. Old Field School
  38. 38. Higher Education <ul><li>1785 The General Assembly chartered The University of Georgia (first classes 1801) </li></ul><ul><li>*with the help of Joseph Henry Lumpkin and T.R.R. Cobb would include one of the premier southern law schools </li></ul><ul><li>1828 Medical College of Georgia in Augusta </li></ul><ul><li>Religious denominations built new colleges </li></ul><ul><li>* Emory College in 1836 – Methodist </li></ul><ul><li>* Oglethorpe College in 1835 – Presbyterian </li></ul><ul><li>* Mercer University in 1837 – Baptist </li></ul><ul><li>Georgia Female College (Wesleyan College) began classes in Macon in 1839 – Methodist </li></ul>
  39. 39. The University of Georgia
  40. 40. Wesleyan College - Macon
  41. 41. Religion <ul><li>Early Protestant – Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Lutheran, Moravian, and Baptist </li></ul><ul><li>Early 1800s, the Great Revival swept the South – camp meetings and revivals </li></ul><ul><li>Predominant churches became the Baptists and Methodists </li></ul><ul><li>Early on, slaves often attended church services with their master </li></ul><ul><li>African Methodist Episcopal (AME) and African Methodist Episcopal Zion (AME Zion) developed in North and were anti-slavery </li></ul><ul><li>Black churches in the South were primarily Baptist and could not preach about slavery </li></ul>
  42. 42. Southern Slave Church
  43. 43. Georgian Social Reform <ul><li>Began to deal with criminals and needy in a more humane approach </li></ul><ul><li>Abolished laws that allowed for cruel punishments </li></ul><ul><li>1817 state opened first penitentiary (repent) </li></ul><ul><li>1818 provided blankets, food, clothing, etc. to county prisoners </li></ul><ul><li>1842 an asylum was built in Milledgeville </li></ul><ul><li>1847 a school for the deaf in Cave Springs </li></ul><ul><li>1852 took responsibility for helping the blind at the Georgia Academy for the Blind in Macon </li></ul>
  44. 44. Georgia Academy for the Blind
  45. 45. Georgia Lunatic Asylum
  46. 46. Ticket Out the Door – Which compromise was the best for the nation? The worst?
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