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A Critical Conversation after the launch of the new Blackbaud Index Canada
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A Critical Conversation after the launch of the new Blackbaud Index Canada

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Using examples and data from the new Index, and adding data from last year's major study of generational giving in Canada, we’ll challenge your strategic thinking and help you understand how to be …

Using examples and data from the new Index, and adding data from last year's major study of generational giving in Canada, we’ll challenge your strategic thinking and help you understand how to be more successful as fundraisers, marketers and industry leaders.

We will cover the following topics:

• how the new Blackbaud Index for Canada will transform the use of data for charities in Canada
• strategic and tactical takeaways now, and in the future, of this ever-fresh Blackbaud Index
• how to think critically about your Foundation, and how to remain at the forefront of fundraising excellence in Canada


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  • 1. Who Are We? Mike Johnston Founder, HJC, Integrated Fundraising Consultants Integrated Fundraising Specialists Aerobics Instructor, Hockey Dad Patricia Tynan President and CEO SickKids Foundation Committed Strategic Fundraiser Sr. Marketing Manager at Blackbaud Favourite causes: Front Steps, World Future Society Ted Garrard
  • 2. “Difficult to see. Always in motion is the future.” Yoda, 900 year-old Jedi Master, ACFRE
  • 3. “THE MORE ONE KNOWS, THE MORE ONE CAN CONTROL EVENTS.” SIR FRANCIS BACON
  • 4. Visit www.Blackbaud.com/CharitableGiving
  • 5. • Data drawn from 250 Canadian charities • These organizations raise approximately $600 to $700 million a year – around 6% of receipted giving in Canada
  • 6. Making It Work For You
  • 7. OnlineOverall Visit www.Blackbaud.CA/BlackbaudIndex
  • 8. Special Report • Key Insights – Overall giving is flat – Online giving continues to grow – Sophistication is growing among competition – Government funding is decreasing – Canada Post is changing the game – Diversification is necessary www.Blackbaud.CA/Blackbau dIndex
  • 9. • Compared to everyone but the United States, our sector is the most mature in the charitable world (volunteerism, major gifts, multiple channels, events, etc) • It is increasingly using proven, commercial techniques to be more effective non-profit organizations
  • 10. • 400,000 customers • $37.2 billion in revenue in 2013 • What can we learn about how they treat their customers?
  • 11. Oracle Presentation on Mapping the Customer Experience : http://slidesha.re/1raXyDw
  • 12. Integrated Lead Management Plan: Pictures from a client’s facilitated session.
  • 13. • Canadian economy, as a commodity-led economy was insulated from the recent recession • Our conservative banks, insulated the economy as well
  • 14. % Of Generation Giving Totalannualgiving $0 $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200 $1,400 $1,600 $1,800 55% 65% 75% 85% 95% 79% Give 5.8 M donors $831 yr/avg 4.5 charities $4.8 B/yr 62% Give 4.5M donors $639 yr/avg 4.0 charities $2.9 B/yr 78% Give 6.9 M donors $942 yr/avg 4.9 charities $6.5 B/yr 87% Give 3.1 M donors $1507 yr/avg 7.0 charities $4.7 B/yr Gen Y Gen X Boomers Matures Generational Giving Bubble size is ‘Estimated Annual Contributions’ An overview of annual giving by generation confirms the importance of Boomers in the charitable giving space. 16 Born: 81-91 Born: before 1946 Born: 46-64 Born: 65-80
  • 15. HYPER-CHOICE IS IT THE DEATH OF UNRESTRICTED GIVING?
  • 16. “Honey, spend the money wherever you need to. I trust you.”
  • 17. 19 24% 22% 49% 26% 18% 53% 23% 25% 46% 10% 40% 43% Directed donation Unrestricted donation Either is fine Directed Giving Preferences Gen Y Gen X Boomers Matures 27% 55% 7% 5% 22% 44% 6% 1% 22% 34% 5% 0 14% 28% 7% 2% Decide where funds go See the impact of my donation Thank you gift Public recognition Would Motivate Me a Great Deal to Make a Larger Donation to Charity *Bolding indicates statistical significance among audiences. Arrows indicate statistical significance between 2010 and 2013.
  • 18. • Donors say that a charity’s website is an important way to stay in touch, yet far fewer report actually visiting these sites • However, the website is an important transaction channel – especially with Gen X. More say they contributed in this way across generations in 2013 than in 2010 Transactional: Online 21 85% 41% 45% 76% 29% 55% 60% 25% 35% 45% 16% 31% Visiting website is important way to stay in touch with charity Visit website of charities you support Made a donation through org's website in last 2 years Gen Y Gen X Boomers Matures Website Credit card 90% Paypal 38% Amazon payment 2% Ways Would Pay 2010 41% 37% 29% 24% ↑
  • 19. GEN Y GEN X BOOMERS MATURES 55% 54% 58% 55% 45% 55% 35% 31% 21% 35% 47% 56% 36% 39% 38% 30% 29% 33% 40% 37% 11% 23% 36% 58% 22% 29% 37% 34% 22% 24% 29% 29% 24% 20% 25% 20% 25% 19% 11% 9% 15% 14% 12% 14% 5% 9% 15% 18% 7% 5% 4% 9% 4% 9% 4% 4% 5% 8% 4% 3% 12% 4% 2% - 6% 4% 3% 2% 1% 2% 3% 2% Donated this way in last 2 years 56% 41% 41% 36% 35% 32% 32% 26% 22% 15% 13% 12% 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 2% Checkout Donation Online Donation Honor/Tribute Purchase for Proceeds Pledge at Event Mailed Check/Credit Card Door to Door* Monthly Debit Street Canvassing* Third Party Vendor Email* Phone Radio/TV* Online Ad* Will/Planned Gift Mobile/Text Social Networking Site Stocks, Bonds, Property Giving Channels Bolding indicates statistical significance among audiences. Arrows indicate statistical significance between 2010 and 2013. 22 *New or changed attribute, no tracking data ↑ ↑ ↑ ↓ ↑ ↓ ↑ ↑ ↓ ↑ ↑ ↓
  • 20. So what’s the Strategy Map?
  • 21. Southwest Airlines Strategy Map Lower costs Increase d revenue Profitability On-time Flights Lowest prices Fast ground turnaround Ground crew aligned with company goals
  • 22. OBJECTIVES INDICATORS TARGETS INITIATIVES Finance Market value 30% CAGR Stockholder communications Seat revenue 20% CAGR Price check comparison Plane lease cost 5% CAGR Preferred supplierCustomers FAA on-time arrival rating No. 1 Quality management Customer ranking (market survey) No. 1 Customer-loyalty programme Capacities Time on ground 30 minutes Cycle-time optimisation program On-time departure 90% LandG % ground crew shareholders Year 1: 70% Year 3: 90% Year 5: 100% Employee stock option plan % ground crew trained Ground crew training Profitability Increased revenue Lower costs On-time flights Lowest prices Fast ground turnaround Ground crew aligned with company goals
  • 23. What is the Balanced Scorecard? ?
  • 24. l” “a tool for identifying the underlying model of success for your organisation and then communicating about it, reporting on it, aligning people with it, and managing performance to deliver the results demanded The Balanced Scorecard is…
  • 25. Creating a Balanced Scorecard is a Full Contact Sport
  • 26. But it’s worth it!
  • 27. Towson University (Baltimore) – Gary Rubin’s Journey: Full Contact Sport
  • 28. 31Proprietary & Confidential6/8/2014 Slide 31
  • 29. 32Proprietary & Confidential6/8/2014 Slide 32
  • 30. • Integrated team: some senior (Directors) people had to go and new people brought in – healthy change • The President is on board • Fundraising results are already improved in retention and acquisition and average gift! The End Result
  • 31. SickKids Foundation - A Case Study on Making Good, Critical Decisions for Fundraising • A Shaken Foundation in 2009: – Negotiated resignation of the CEO – Staff turnover of 40% – Total fundraising revenue of $86.5 million – Cost per dollar of 40 cents – Granted $64.5 million – Media reports questioning fundraising practices, salaries – No annual report or publicly available financial statements – Staff discouraged from participating in conferences/training events – Strained relationship with the Hospital
  • 32. SickKids Foundation – A Case Study on Making Good, Critical Decisions for Fundraising • My mandate: – Re-structure and stabilize the Foundation – Re-build public reputation – Repair relationship with the Hospital – Reduce cost per dollar while increasing fundraising revenue – Launch a $200 million fundraising campaign to build a new facility for research & learning, without compromising core funding commitments to the Hospital – Identify opportunities for strategic growth – Prepare for significant Board turnover – 60 % of Board members’ terms ending over 2010-12 period
  • 33. • Short-term actions: – Reduced operating costs by 25% and incurred one-time re-structuring costs of $3.5 million – Re-structured senior staff team and aligned business around four core fundraising channels: Direct Marketing, Events, Corporate Partnerships, and Major Gifts – value in revenue diversification – Beefed up Major Gifts and Gift and Estate Planning staff resources – needed quick early wins to bolster revenue at lower cost – Developed a strategic plan with Board and Hospital input – Launched the Research & Learning Tower Campaign with no pre-planning or lead gifts secured – Published our first annual report in years
  • 34. • Short-term actions: – Built early rapport with the Hospital CEO – Re-vamped fundraising policy framework with the Hospital – Established a new fundraising priority-setting process – Established our Fundraising Enhancement Initiative – a levy against designated gifts so as to free up unrestricted fundraising revenue – Overhauled the Board nominations process – Outreach to key media to establish rapport and share our plans – Became first Hospital Foundation in Canada to become accredited under the Imagine Canada Standards Program – highest commitment to transparency and accountability
  • 35. • Medium-term actions: – Once cost per dollar back to acceptable levels, began strategic reinvestment in fundraising programs, brand enhancement, and operational supports: • Direct Marketing new donor acquisition • Signature Events program • Corporate Sponsorship • Community Outreach programs (Chinese community, Muslim community, South Asian community, Caribbean community) • Brand extensions – Healthy & Happy Campaign, National donor recognition • Web and social media development – Priority to raise more unrestricted fundraising revenue (target of 40% of total revenue) – Strategic recruitment of 17 new Board members – next generation leaders
  • 36. • Medium Term Actions: – Investment in staff: • Strategic recruitments • Staff Development investment • Mentorship program • Competitive compensation • Promoting sector engagement – Investment in business process improvements/data analytics – Investment in improved granting processes/flow of restricted funds – Investment in improved donor stewardship – Investment in enhancing the culture of philanthropy at the Hospital – Investment in strategic fundraising partnerships – Organizational focus on the donor experience and innovation
  • 37. • The Foundation in 2014: – Fundraising revenue of $125 million (45% growth over 2009) – Cost per dollar of 30 cents (25% improvement from 2009) – Granted $129 million (100% improvement over 2009) – Staff turnover <10% – Successfully completed $200 million campaign for the Research & Learning Tower – Unrestricted fundraising revenue accounts for 41% of total revenue – Attracted major transformational gifts ($30 million, $40 million, $20 million, plus soon to be announced gift) – Strong relationship with the Hospital – High degree of staff and Board engagement
  • 38. • The Future: – Continued strategic investments to grow fundraising programs – Investment in people, process, and systems to support fundraising – Focus on the best donor experience and best in class stewardship – Investment in further building the brand and brand reputation – Enhanced use of volunteers for expertise, leverage, and philanthropic support – Building out platform and priorities for the next comprehensive campaign for SickKids
  • 39. Conclusion – Data is more important than ever to make good strategic and tactical choices – Boards demand (more sophisticated), and need, better data than ever to make more informed choices – A more competitive environment now means that risk capital and piloting new ideas are need data backup – Proof points derived from good data are necessary to get Board commitments of investment cash for fundraising – Using more sophisticated models of operation (BSC, Strategy Map, Donor Journey Mapping) need to be tied to good data – Investing more in people and capacity is vital but need good data to truly leverage vastly improved skills of staff