2
Indian Scenario of
Engineering Services
Outsourcing (ESO) Business
Excellence through Quality
Samrachana Engineering Ser...
3
Around the world, Indian IT vendors have shown their accomplishment reaching the pinnacle by
setting an example of achie...
4
To capitalize on its opportunity, India must equip five to seven cities with world-class
infrastructure over the next 12...
5
The total engineering spend is highly fragmented by industry verticals with Automotive at 19%,
Aerospace at 8%, Utilitie...
6
Dr. Subhash Deo 5
Over the years, for instance outsourced product engineering (mechanical) services have
graduated from ...
7
The following table outlines the scope of engineering services (with indicative service
offerings) currently considered ...
8
The ITO and software industry is continuously renewing itself and seeking to grow by addressing
newer service lines and ...
9
The fourth category includes companies such as Infotech, QUEST Global, Quantech Global,
Geometric Software, Plexion Tech...
10
For India, Engineering Services Offshoring presents a tremendous opportunity – it is not only a
significant revenue gen...
11
As might be expected in such a burgeoning market, the engineers who work for these vendors in
the ESO industry have onl...
12
Along with quite a few advantages, at the same time, India faces substantial challenges as well. If
address the challen...
13
China is likely to be a formidable competitor for India: While India has the advantage in terms of
English language ski...
14
Dr. Subhash Deo 13
o Leverage local industry „offsets‟
- The government should take a structured approach to leveraging...
15
Dr. Subhash Deo 14
Finally, it can be well understood that the stakes for India are even higher than the loss of one
po...
16
Dr. Subhash Deo 15
(ix) A Fatigue Analysis and Life Estimation of Crankshaft- A review, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek
Sunnapwar,...
17
Dr. Subhash Deo 16
(xix) Forge Steel Automotive Crankshaft Fatigue Life Estimation and Comparison using Stress
and Stra...
18
Dr. Subhash Deo 17
(xxx) Comparative Evaluation of Fatigue Assessment Techniques on a Forged Steel Crankshaft
of a Sing...
19
Dr. Subhash Deo 18
(xliii) CFD Simulation of Calendria Flow and Temperature Distribution Inside Nuclear Reactor,
Dr. Su...
20
Dr. Subhash Deo 19
(liv) Business Plan on Engineering Services Company in India – A complete business plan for
opening ...
21
Dr. Subhash Deo 20
(lxiii) Aero and Auto Modeling Methodologies, 21-22 September 2012, Mentoring of Aero Club
Vignan at...
22
Samrachana Engineering Services & Sourcing Solutions Pvt. Ltd.
Road No.1, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad - 500 005 (AP)
• Pho...
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Today the scope of outsourced engineering services has expanded beyond product design and R&D services to include industrial services such as New Product Induction from conceptual design to final product development and validation, process engineering and its improvement, plant automation and enterprise asset management.

To capitalize on its opportunity, India must equip five to seven cities with world-class infrastructure over the next 12 years (by 2020). It must expand its opportunities for engineering education. And it must market itself in a systematic way, to let corporate decision-makers around the world know that Indian engineers can do much more than code. Without serious investments in education and physical plants, and an unprecedented campaign that joins business and government leaders to meet these demands, ESO could be a missed opportunity for India—and part of another country’s boom.

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  1. 1. 2 Indian Scenario of Engineering Services Outsourcing (ESO) Business Excellence through Quality Samrachana Engineering Services & Sourcing Solutions Pvt. Ltd.
  2. 2. 3 Around the world, Indian IT vendors have shown their accomplishment reaching the pinnacle by setting an example of achieving strength after strength as providers of Information Technology Outsourcing (ITO) and Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) services to companies worldwide. Moreover, recent global trend shows that the rest of the world is looking at India as an engineering knowledge hub which has created a new possibility for India to add a third major services growth stream—Engineering Services Outsourcing (ESO)—to its rapidly evolving economy. However significant potential still lies relatively unexplored. The study conducted on Engineering Services Outsourcing (ESO) by leading business intelligence major such as International Data Corporation (IDC) and other consultancy firms like Giga, Forrester Research, McKinsey & Company, NASSCOM and Booz Allen Hamilton depicts that the engineering services outsourcing market is huge. Global spending for engineering services in 2004 was US$750 billion per year. By 2020, the worldwide spend on engineering services is expected to increase to more than $1.1 trillion. Of the $750 billion spent today, only $10-15 billion is currently being offshored—a tiny fraction of the total. India brings home about 12 percent of today‘s offshored market. By 2020, it has been estimated that as much as 25 to 30 percent of a much larger $150 to $225 billion market for offshored engineering services could belong to India—as much as $50 billion in annual revenue. Today the scope of outsourced engineering services has expanded beyond product design and R&D services to include industrial services such as New Product Induction from conceptual design to final product development and validation, process engineering and its improvement, plant automation and enterprise asset management. However, India has the single largest pool of engineering talent (28%) among the emerging countries capable of taking on this kind of work—more than Russia (11%) and China (10%) combined, but India must also overcome some serious challenges if it is to succeed. First, although India trains more engineers suitable for BPO and ESO than any other low-cost countries, not all are equipped with the skill sets required to succeed in this market. Even allowing for a healthy growth rate of 4% a year in the number of graduates, the projected number of engineers with the right specialized skills will not be nearly enough to meet the potential demand. Second, India‘s weak engineering and physical infrastructures are likely to hamper growth as well. As opposed to ITO/BPO, ESO has close links with manufacturing and it may be difficult for India succeed without significantly enhancing manufacturing capabilities – not easily accomplished given the infrastructural constraints. ITO/BPO success has been driven by companies investing in almost ―standalone‖ facilities to de-risk themselves; however, this won‘t work with manufacturing. Dr. Subhash Deo (1) INTRODUCTION 2 Excellence through Quality
  3. 3. 4 To capitalize on its opportunity, India must equip five to seven cities with world-class infrastructure over the next 12 years (by 2020). It must expand its opportunities for engineering education. And it must market itself in a systematic way, to let corporate decision-makers around the world know that Indian engineers can do much more than code. Without serious investments in education and physical plants, and an unprecedented campaign that joins business and government leaders to meet these demands, ESO could be a missed opportunity for India—and part of another country‘s boom. Dr. Subhash Deo (2) POTENTIAL MARKET 3 Excellence through Quality The various leading global business intelligence and consultancy firms have conducted several independent studies on Engineering Services Outsourcing (ESO) business scenario globally as well as locally considering India. Among them the major are International Data Corporation (IDC) and other consultancy firms like Giga, Forrester Research, McKinsey & Company, NASSCOM and Booz Allen Hamilton. Almost all have predicted and reasoned more or less similar numbers. The joint study for the potential of outsourcing engineering services to India conducted by NASSCOM and Booz Allen Hamilton depicts that engineering services outsourcing is a huge market: Global spending for engineering services in 2004 was US$750 billion per year, an amount nearly equal to India‘s entire gross domestic product. By 2020, the worldwide spend on engineering services is expected to increase to more than $1.1 trillion. Of the $750 billion spent today, only $10-15 billion is currently being offshored—a tiny fraction of the total. India brings home about 12 percent of today‘s offshored market, which it currently shares with Canada, China, Mexico and Eastern Europe. By 2020, it has been estimated that as much as 25 to 30 percent of a much larger $150 to $225 billion market for offshored engineering services could belong to India—as much as $50 billion in annual revenue—if the country builds the capacities, capabilities, infrastructure, and the international reputation it needs to become the preferred destination for these complex, high-value services. It has been seen that global demand for ESO across five sectors—Automotive, Aerospace, Hi- tech/Telecom, Utilities, and Construction/Industrial, which together represent a high percentage of the global engineering spend. For each of those sectors, the trend is across different kinds of service offerings—product and component design, plant design, process engineering, plant maintenance & operations and core innovation services. Along with the above industries one can include the complete gamut of industries can be benefited from the ESO services are such as Automotive, Aerospace, Power, Ship Building, Marine, Turbo-machinery, Chemical, Mechanical, Heavy Engineering, Medical & Health Care, Consumer products, Military & Defense, Electric, Petroleum, Large structures, Construction, Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Telecommunication, Embeded, Opto Electronics industry along with other associated industries.
  4. 4. 5 The total engineering spend is highly fragmented by industry verticals with Automotive at 19%, Aerospace at 8%, Utilities at 3%, Construction/Industrial 8%, Hi-tech/Telecom 30%, Defense 20% and others 12% in 2004. Hi-tech/Telecom is the dominant and fastest growing sector, with 30% of the market depicts it is more towards Hi-tech design services at $ 175 Billion and is estimated to reach $ 300 Billion by 2020. Hi-tech is also estimated to have the largest engineering spend and is the most open to global engineering processes. India enjoys a relatively strong position in the automotive and hi-tech/telecom engineering services market with a US$25 billion opportunity by 2020. Aerospace offers the greatest potential for expansion – though it is also one of the toughest opportunities to tap because of its close association with the defense sector. The area wise offshoring business depicts that USA contributes maximum spend in Engineering services outsourcing along with Europe specifically Germany, UK, France and Italy. Moreover, Japan has 21% share of the global spend of around US$ 750 Billion in 2004. It has also been found that 36% of companies sent some of their engineering offshore, 31% offshored some research and development, and 16% shipped out a portion of their product design. The offshoring of innovation services has largely been done in advanced countries — only 9% of the world‘s budget for engineering found its way to low-cost countries. Many companies begin offshoring to cut costs, but then expand their commitments for more strategic reasons. Consider the Automotive sector, for example, which offshores engineering. While some companies—such as GM—use offshoring primarily as a tactical tool to help cut costs, others—such as Toyota—see the offshoring of product development in more strategic terms, as a way to help open up new markets and boost overall productivity and quality. This more strategic view will become increasingly prevalent over time. Executives in many industries are now beginning to believe that sending product development offshore is a smart way not only to reduce the price tag of product innovation, but to accelerate speed to market and add to the sheer quantity of innovation. Dr. Subhash Deo 4 Excellence through Quality (3) EVOLUTION OF ENGINEERING SERVICES OUTSOURCING Today, globalization of innovation is being spearheaded by the largest spenders on innovation, in terms of both regions and sectors and Engineering Services Offshoring is being used to expand global innovation capacity.
  5. 5. 6 Dr. Subhash Deo 5 Over the years, for instance outsourced product engineering (mechanical) services have graduated from basic drawing conversions and CAD migration assignments, through 2D - 3D modeling and digital mock-ups, conceptual design, analysis and validation; complete design outsourcing, manufacturing coordination, CPC / PDM; overall process quality improvement, e- engineering solutions, remote monitoring and system architecture development. An ESO evolution figure is presented below, which clearly shows that there are tremendous opportunities exist to cultivate and then successfully reap out at its maturity. Activities listed in the above figure are indicative of the increasing maturity of outsourced engineering services in product design (mechanical) and may not be exhaustive. Engineering design is a very iterative process and equally importantly these iterations take place across different user groups such as Product design teams, manufacturing teams, suppliers and finally, consumers. What this means is that in order to become a truly world-class engineering design company, an organization must develop the capability and capacity to seamlessly work with these different user groups and provide value. Moreover, today increasing levels of digitization have resulted in much of the product development process being performed virtually using computing technologies. Further, the development of common enterprise management applications and technology platforms have driven information integration across the value stream to facilitate more efficient planning, deployment and management of capital assets and production. Excellence through Quality
  6. 6. 7 The following table outlines the scope of engineering services (with indicative service offerings) currently considered outsource-able. Product Design (Mechanical & Electronic) Plant Automation Services Engineering analysis Design Optimization Electronics and embedded software Knowledge based engineering PLM solutions Control System Integration Production Optimization Manufacturing Execution system Life estimation & improvement Automated systems Consolidation Plant Design / Process Engineering Enterprise Asset Management Detailed plant design Process planning & process improvement Construction and commissioning support TPM solutions Product implementation OEM solutions There are several innovative technologies being used in product design and development. These technologies are primarily aimed at improving the engineering efficiency, collaborative engineering and improving the performance and functionality of products. CAX technologies have been extremely useful in achieving all of these and more. Increasingly, in industries where product safety and reliability are of utmost importance, these latest technologies will help simulate the actual environment in which the product will be used and thereby help companies design products that will meet the regulations as well as user preferences. It is important to note that these technologies are also driving the costs down in product design. In the engineering services space which is being addressed by the Indian IT industry, companies need to focus on technologies that enable faster, safer and easier transfer of large volumes of data. They must also focus on collaborative working technologies that will enable different teams in different parts of world to concurrently work together. Excellence through Quality Dr. Subhash Deo 6
  7. 7. 8 The ITO and software industry is continuously renewing itself and seeking to grow by addressing newer service lines and the latest one being engineering services. Companies in India have developed capabilities and skill sets, and invested in technology platforms to leverage this opportunity. The growth in engineering services signifies the need for global corporations to expand their R&D pool beyond their home countries and hence all important stakeholders including the government of India, academic institutions, service providers and trade bodies such as NASSCOM will need to undertake a series of important measures. Exponential growth in Engineering Services Outsourcing business can be witnessed from the amount of investment made from the top IT firms in India referring quite a few names such as TCS, Infosys, Wipro, Satyam etc. In India, the Engineering Services are offered by four different categories of companies. a. IT Companies, which also offer Engineering Services b. Manufacturing companies, which offer Engineering Services c. Large MNCs who have their own captives in India d. Third party vendors, plain Engineering Service provider There are at least eight to ten key players in each of the above four categories. First category of the company includes, TCS, Wipro, Infosys, Satyam, HP, IBM, Patni Computer, HCL Tech, HCL Insys, L&T Infotech, Tech Pacific, Redington, Ingram Micros, NIIT, Mahindra BT and CMC, etc. The major chunk of ESO services revenue is shared by these companies only and which is nothing but the half of the industry pie. The second category includes Tata Autocomp, Tata Technologies, Mahindra Engineering Services, L&T, Samtel, Sona Engineering Services, Tequmche, Hero Group, TVS Group, Kinetic Group, Lokesh technologies, etc. The third category includes such as GE, Boeing, Airbus, Rolls Royce, Scecma, Honeywell, EDAG, Emerson, Whirlpool, Tower Automotive, Ford, Caterpillar, John Deere, Eaton Corporation, Delphi, Daimler Chrysler, GM, Toyota Motor, Honda, Nissan Motor, Mitusbishi, Opel, Volvo, Hyundai and Johnson Controls, Lear Inc, United Technologies, Johnson Controls, Ingersoll Rand, etc. Dr. Subhash Deo (4) INDIAN ESO SERVICE PROVIDERS 7 Excellence through Quality
  8. 8. 9 The fourth category includes companies such as Infotech, QUEST Global, Quantech Global, Geometric Software, Plexion Technologies, Onward Technologies, Cadestech, Axis IT&T, CSM Software, Easitech, Designtech, Emug Technologies, Harita, Rolta India, Neilsoft, etc. Based on the above categories and the present business scenario, among the big three of Indian ITO and ESO service providers, TCS happens to be in almost all the areas. Wipros‘ positioning on other hand needs a bit of explaining. It may come as a surprise that Wipro draws most of its engineering services revenues from telecom and semiconductor. Wipro is more of an R&D services player than an engineering services player. The clear tilt towards telecom and semiconductor is because R&D constitutes a significant part of these outsourced services. However, with the acquisition of Quantech, it should strengthen its position in automotive, aerospace, and consumer products as well. Infosys ranks fairly high in the list though traditionally not known as a product engineering company. Almost all of its revenue from engineering services comes from manufacturing. But the contribution of engineering services to the overall revenue is on a steady decline. The most interesting story in engineering services pertains to the next tier companies. The next three multi-services firms, without exception, identified engineering services as the differentiator. Satyam, which does not boast about its engineering services capability, fares quite impressively with as much as 6.5% of its revenue coming from this area. Also, Satyam, like TCS, has a balanced portfolio with automotive, aerospace, consumer products, and construction all contributing significantly. HCL, the next player, is the other extreme. It draws more than 85% of its engineering services revenue from aerospace. But by far, Patnis engineering services is the most mature. Not only has it a balanced portfolio in terms of industries addressed, its geographical presence is also most diverse. Japan, which according to the 2006 Nasscom-Booz Allen Hamilton report on engineering services, accounts for 21% of global engineering services spend, is not penetrated well enough by anyone other than Patni. The real surprise comes in the form of the No 2 ranked Tata Technologies. This specialized engineering services firm started as an in-house IT and engineering services division of Tata Motors. Tata Technologies grew impressively by virtue of a single large acquisition that of INCAT. The estimated revenues exclude that from India and other businesses like training and ERP implementation. INCAT is extremely strong in training. The next specialized firm, Infotech Enterprise, comes at No 7. The company that boasts among its clientele, aerospace players such as Pratt & Whitney, Boeing and Airbus. Like Infotech, most niche players are focused on one industry or two. For example, Neilsoft is fairly focused on construction and industrial automation. L&T Infotech is focused on construction and Geometric Software is focused on automotive and consumer products. Dr. Subhash Deo 8 Excellence through Quality
  9. 9. 10 For India, Engineering Services Offshoring presents a tremendous opportunity – it is not only a significant revenue generator, but will also place India on the global innovation map. Attaining, training and retaining talent will be a critical next step for India to maintain its current advantage. India possesses some formidable strength as a potential powerhouse of engineering services. At the top of the list is the widespread availability of highly skilled, English speaking engineers. At present, India accounts for 28 percent of all of the available ESO and BPO talent in low-cost countries. The next largest sources of low-cost supply, Russia and China, contribute only 11% and 10%, respectively. The strong track record of Indian vendors in BPO and ITO is also likely to boost the confidence of would-be global clients in India‘s capabilities. It‘s hardly a secret that many marquee name companies have found India to be a reliable service partner. Indeed, many multinationals could easily have an ―India Inside‖ label printed on their products. The Booz Allen study found that in innovation, for example, firms that outsourced such development work to India met projected savings goals. A third positive factor for India is the fact that many of the vendors who will evolve into engineering services providers are likely to already have a great deal of experience winning and retaining BPO and ITO contracts. The delivery models are well established, and after a decade or more in business, these vendors are likely to have developed the ability to maintain a very high level of quality control. Indeed, quality levels among current Indian providers of engineering services are already high and climbing fast— matching or exceeding the ―first time right‖ levels of the firm‘s own engineers. If it is handled well, India‘s share of the global ESO market could take off at the same time as worldwide demand for ESO increases. India has the potential to control 20 to 25% of the global market for offshored engineering services by 2010. By 2020, that number could be 25 to 30%, or $50 billion of the expected $150 to $225 billion market. Of India‘s total market share in offshored engineering services, Hi-tech/Telecom will likely represent the largest slice, capitalizing on India‘s existing relationships and expertise. Automotive will most likely be the second-largest sector. Of course, India‘s potential depends in part on the amount of experience and expertise available, which vary substantially between sectors. Unsurprisingly, vendors have the most years of ESO experience in Hi-tech/Telecom, with an average of 12 years of work experience. This number is nearly matched by 10 years‘ average experience for vendors in the automotive industry. Construction/ Industrial, Aerospace, and Utilities vendors, on the other hand, are all relative youngsters, with averages of 5, 5.4 years experience respectively. Dr. Subhash Deo (5) INDIA‟S ADVANTAGES 9 Excellence through Quality
  10. 10. 11 As might be expected in such a burgeoning market, the engineers who work for these vendors in the ESO industry have only a few years experience. Right now, the average level of work experience for individual engineers is less than 5 years, across all five sectors. Automotive and Construction/Industrial have the highest level of average experience, about 5.0 years, followed by High-Tech/Telecom (4.6 years), Aerospace (4.1 years) and Utilities (3.0 years). Given the rapid expansion of the Indian economy, it is unlikely that these numbers will change appreciably any time soon. To a degree, this problem will continue to be managed through the supervision of much more senior engineers. These senior managers are either experienced local engineers or returning expatriates, whom companies have found especially useful in bridging cultural gaps between foreign clients and local engineers. Automotive senior managers had the most experience on average, with 18 years‘ experience on their profile. Hi-tech/Telecom followed closely behind, with an average of 17 years of work experience. Aerospace and Construction/Industrial senior engineers had 16 and 15 years‘ experience respectively. Only Utilities managers, in fact, were substantially lower, averaging only 10 years of experience. Yet vendors‘ ascent on the ESO learning curve may well be more rapid than those figures indicate, as has been the case with BPO and ITO. As noted above in the statistic on ―first time right‖ designs, Indian capacities have often developed much more quickly than might have been expected. Beyond the capacities of individual firms, India‘s growing economic clout is also expected to act as an increasingly attractive lure for many global companies. The Economist Intelligence Unit forecasts that by 2015, India‘s GDP is likely to have grown to 2.5 times its current size, with a strong emphasis on personal consumption—a boon for consumer products companies. This trend may prove to be a powerful additional incentive for potential ESO clients to use Indian engineering services as a way to increase their presence in and knowledge of the Indian market. The increasing GDP may also become a useful lever for policymakers, who may be able to make a commitment to increase local sourcing of engineering services part of a larger deal to increase the company‘s domestic market access. Dr. Subhash Deo 10 Excellence through Quality (6) INDIA‟S CHALLENGES Engineering Services, like every business in this world is competitive. What companies need to do is understand the unique characteristics of this market segment, buyer preferences and demands to strategize. Indian companies continue to provide their services to overseas customers at an affordable cost, acceptable quality, and on time. Over the years, these have become hygiene factors and clients are now looking for value propositions reflecting on competence, capability, capacity, and experience.
  11. 11. 12 Along with quite a few advantages, at the same time, India faces substantial challenges as well. If address the challenges appropriately, engineering services offshoring (ESO) can help the Indian offshore services industry further consolidate its leadership position and build a significant skill- value advantage over the competition. The most crucial challenge, perhaps, is the cultivation of talent. Right now, approximately 35,000 engineers work in engineering services. By 2020, India could need as many as 250,000 to truly reach its potential in terms of market share. While India is already the largest producer of engineers suitable for BPO and ESO outsourcing among other low-wage countries, it will not have enough trained professionals to handle the projected volume of work as the ESO space develops. Although India has almost 1,400 engineering schools, only a handful of schools are recognized as providing a world-class engineering education. Discussion with vendors suggests that recruiters consider candidates from only a fraction of these schools. Furthermore, not all of the engineering graduates from these institutions are suitable for engineering services, given the skill requirements and domain knowledge. Unlike BPO, where the primary requirement is English- speaking capability, engineering services calls for candidates with a good grasp of engineering fundamentals. Shortages will be especially acute in sectors other than Hi-tech/Telecom, since computer science, electronics and electrical engineering account for more than 60% of majors, drawn by rising salaries in the sector and the general excitement surrounding the IT boom. Effectively, this means that the number of graduates suitable for ESO work today is actually a small percentage of today‘s 220,000 graduating engineers. Even in the most popular sector, Hi- tech/Telecom, shortages are expected. Infrastructure is another key issue. While the IT infrastructure is adequate for current needs, India still lags other key Asian countries in most respects. In speed and cost of Internet access, road infrastructure, port infrastructure, air infrastructure, and telecom infrastructure, Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore are all still ahead of the game. In fact, of those five types of essential infrastructure, only India‘s telecom infrastructure can be considered adequate. Perhaps more significantly, India also lags behind China in such metrics as roads, airports, and telecom infrastructure—all of which may be of crucial importance as China is likely to become India‘s main competitor for this business. A key consideration for India in its bid to become the dominant player in offshored engineering services is its competition from other low-cost countries. Within the developing world, a number of countries are likely to participate in the growth of ESO. Participants who can provide low-end services are likely to include small countries unfamiliar to players in the BPO markets, such as Nigeria and Vietnam. When it comes to high-end, complex tasks, however, the most likely scenario is that India and China will bring home the most contracts, since there are very few (if any) countries that can pose a threat, given their lack of scale relative to India and China. Dr. Subhash Deo 11 Excellence through Quality
  12. 12. 13 China is likely to be a formidable competitor for India: While India has the advantage in terms of English language skills, cultural compatibility with the West, a robust political and legal system, and relatively strong protection of intellectual property (IP), China has a much stronger infrastructure and a well-developed manufacturing base. Dr. Subhash Deo 12 Excellence through Quality To target the maximum potential revenue of $50 billion by 2020 – all important stakeholders including the government of India, academic institutions, service providers and trade bodies will need to undertake a series of important measures. A carefully thought out strategy that combines strong marketing efforts – such as the development of an ‗Engineered in India‖ brand, with investments in infrastructure, workforce and expertise and the very least is required. In addition, it‘s important for all stakeholders to get together and think about how India‘s domestic growth can become a strategic advantage in the long term. To realize this opportunity, India needs to develop a multi-pronged strategy for success. Some of the recommended actions are broader in scope, related to those required to sustain its lead in ESO along with ITO & BPO business as a cumulative – and are already at various stages of planning and execution. Others are more specific, targeted at addressing the engineering services market. o Build the “Engineered in India” brand - Marketing India as a destination of choice by creating a division which specifically addresses this segment. - Establishing industry specific international trade bodies, conducting regular trade shows and leveraging Indian consulates for educating local and international governments on benefits of offshoring. o Build domain expertise through symbiotic relationships with experts - In public sector entities within India. - Acquiring design houses in the US, Europe and Japan to gain requisite expertise and hiring experts from other countries. o Focus on infrastructure creation - With an island of infrastructure approach for physical infrastructure and consortium based approach for engineering infrastructure. o Undertake initiatives to improve workforce - Address quantity issues with investment in academic institutions, special national level technical diploma programs, allow for private spend to increase quantity. - Address quality issues by standardizing curricula, training and certification programs and investment in long-term internships and solicit government help in retention. (7) STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS
  13. 13. 14 Dr. Subhash Deo 13 o Leverage local industry „offsets‟ - The government should take a structured approach to leveraging industry – for e.g. large imports in Aerospace, Defense, and Utilities should be leveraged through offset programs. o Align government policy and incentives - Policy towards facilitation of adequate visas is available for professional services. - Policy towards conducive bilateral relations between the institutions, organizations and even countries as well. - Policy towards investment in infrastructure and strengthen law to enhance IP protection. - Incentives for investing in R&D and innovation. For India to become a global hub for engineering services, building an eco-system with high quality engineers, world-class infrastructure, investments in building domain knowledge, research and development, and growing domestic manufacturing industry are very vital. If address properly the Indian ESO service providers will increasingly create competitive advantage by accessing and building core innovation capabilities in a world-class global network. The ESO services offshoring in India is vast and that too is on very discrete domain of wide and varied industries such as Automotive, Aerospace, Hi-tech/Telecom, Utilities, and Construction/Industrial, which together represent a high percentage of the global engineering spend. Yet like all large opportunities, it won‘t stay available for long. Particularly in those industries where it is most advanced, India has little time before other countries make more inroads into the market. In Hi-tech/Telecom, for instance, we forecast that only one to three years remain before multinationals begin looking for global partners in developing their high-end engineering projects. In Automotive, that number is probably between 3 to 5 years. In other sectors, it‘s likely to be 6 to 10 years before ESO matures. The ESO market, like other market, is going to become progressively more difficult to break into over time, particularly as cost is unlikely to be the most important factor in sourcing a project design. That is good news for the countries that capture that market early and keep it, and not so good for those that waits for the market to mature. Excellence through Quality (8) CONCLUSION
  14. 14. 15 Dr. Subhash Deo 14 Finally, it can be well understood that the stakes for India are even higher than the loss of one potential market. Current service relationships in BPO and ITO could well be impacted if India fails to help its engineers further ascend the value chain. If BPO and ITO are seen merely as cost- saving commodities, sooner or later, outsourcers will look elsewhere for a lower price. To maintain their current, hard-won relationships, vendors will need to add more value— the kind of value that a mature engineering services provider will be able to offer. (liv) Globalization of Engineering Services – The next frontier for India - A joint study on the potential of outsourcing engineering services to India by NASSCOM and Booz Allen Hamilton. (lv) Business Plan on Engineering Services Company in India – A complete business plan for opening an Engineering Services Company in India, including the timeline and financials by Dr. Subhash Deo hiwase, 2003, 2005, 2008, 2012, 2013 & 2014. (lvi) An approach to guesstimate the fatigue life of an industrial shaft using stress life and strain life assessment techniques, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, ASME Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition (IMECE), 2014. (lvii) Assessment of an industrial shaft for its fatigue strength and life estimation using strain life evaluation technique, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, International Journal of Mechanical & Materials Engineering (IJMME), SPRINGER Publisher, (2013). (lviii) Fatigue Strength and Life Prediction of Forged Steel Crankshaft by using Fracture Mechanics Approach, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, (2013), SAE Technical Paper, 2013-26-0141, doi:10.4271/2013-26-0141. (lix) Fatigue Strength and Life Prediction of Forged Steel Crankshaft by using Fracture Mechanics Approach, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, SAE Paper No. 2013-026-141, Symposium on International Automotive Technology (SIAT) organized by ARAI Pune, Proceeding by SAE International USA, 9-11 January 2013. (lx) Evaluation of FEM based fracture mechanics technique to estimate life of an automotive forged steel crankshaft of a single cylinder diesel engine, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, Vidya Sagar Anki, Mahendra Dumpa, (2013), Journal of Procedia Engineering, ELSEVIER, Vol 51 (2013), pp 567-572. Doi:10.1016/j.proeng.2013.01.080. (lxi) Multidimensional modeling of direct injection diesel engine with multiple stage fuel injections, Subhash Hiwase, S Moorthy, Hari Prasad, Mahendra Dumpa, Rajesh Metkar, (2013), Journal of Procedia Engineering, ELSEVIER, Vol 51 (2013), pp 670-675. Doi:10.1016/j.proeng. 2013.01.095. Excellence through Quality (9) REFRENCES
  15. 15. 16 Dr. Subhash Deo 15 (ix) A Fatigue Analysis and Life Estimation of Crankshaft- A review, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, (2011), International Journal of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, (IJMME), SPRINGER UK, Vol 6, No 3, PP 425-430. (x) Modal Analysis for High Cycle Fatigue Life Estimation of Crankshaft, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, (2011), International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, (IJAER), Volume 6, Number 21 (2011) pp. 2485-2490, ISSN 0973-4562. (xi) Prediction of Fatigue Failure in Engineering Component by using Critical Distance Approach, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, (2011), International Review of Mechanical Engineering (I.RE.M.E.), November 2011, Vol. 05, N.7, pp 1254-1257, ISSN:1970 – 8734. (xii) Comparative Evaluation of Fatigue Assessment Techniques on a Forged Steel Crankshaft of a Single Cylinder Diesel Engine, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, ASME 2012 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, Houston, Texas, USA- November 20-22 2012. Volume 3, Paper No. IMECE2012-85493, pp. 601-609; doi: 10.1115/IMECE2012-85493. (xiii) Comparative Evaluation of Fatigue Assessment Techniques on a Forged Steel Crankshaft of a Single Cylinder Diesel Engine, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Proceedings of the ASME 2012, International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition IMECE2012, IMECE2012-85493, November 9-15, 2012, Houston, Texas, USA. (xiv) Evaluation of FEM based fracture mechanics technique to estimate life of an automotive forged steel crankshaft of a single cylinder diesel engine, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, 3rd, Nirma University, International Conference on Engineering, (NUiCONE 2012), 6-8 December 2012, Published by ELSEVIER, Procedia Engineering. (xv) Multidimensional modeling of direct injection diesel engine with multiple stage fuel injections, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Hiwase, 3rd, Nirma University, International Conference on Engineering, (NUiCONE 2012), 6-8 December 2012, Published by ELSEVIER, Procedia Engineering. (xvi) Fatigue life prediction of IC engine crankshaft: a comparison between the stress life and strain life approach, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Vidya Sagar Anki, Mahendra Dumpa, Front. Mech. Eng., Higher Education Press and SPRINGER- Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011. (xvii)Assessment of fatigue life of an industrial plate using stress life and strain life estimation technique, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Vidya Sagar Anki, Mahendra Dumpa, Int. J. Computer Aided Engineering and Technology (IJCAET), Vol. x, No. x, xxxx. (xviii) Assessment of an Industrial Shaft for its Fatigue Strength and Life Estimation Using Strain Life Evaluation Technique, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Jalgam Ravinder Rao, Vidya Sagar Anki, International Journal of Mechanical and Materials Engineering (IJMME). Excellence through Quality
  16. 16. 17 Dr. Subhash Deo 16 (xix) Forge Steel Automotive Crankshaft Fatigue Life Estimation and Comparison using Stress and Strain life Assessment Techniques, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Jalgam Ravinder Rao, Mahindra Dumpa, Journal of the Brazilian Society of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering. (xx) Forge Steel Automotive Crankshaft Fatigue Life Estimation and Comparison using Stress and Strain life Assessment Techniques, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Iranian Journal of Science and Technology (IJST)-Transaction B: Engineering, 2013. (xxi) A Fundamental Study of an Industrial Shaft For its Fatigue Life Estimation Using Stress Life Assessment Technique, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Jalgam Ravinder Rao, Vidya Sagar Anki, The Archive of Mechanical Engineering. (xxii)Fundamental Study Of An Industrial Shaft For Its Fatigue Life Estimation Using Stress Life Assessment Technique, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, International Journal for Engineering, Sciences and Management, 2013. (xxiii) Fatigue Life Estimation of Shaft by using Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, International Journal of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, (IJMAE), World Academy of Science, Engineering & Technology, USA. (xxiv) Modeling of In-Cylinder Processes in Direct Injection Diesel Engine with Multiple Stage Split Fuel Injections, Subhash Deo Hiwase, S. Moorthy, Hari Prasad, Mahendra Dumpa, Rajesh M. Metkar, ASME 2013 Summer Heat Transfer Conference, July 14-19, 2013, Minneapolis, MN. (xxv)The Recent Emerging Trends in IC Engine Combustion Modelling, Subhash Deo Hiwase, S. Moorthy, Hari Prasad, Mahendra Dumpa, Rajesh M. Metkar, 9th-12th January 2013, SIAT, India, Will be published in SAE International (Accepted), SAE-2012-26-0514. (xxvi) Fatigue strength and Life Prediction of Forged Steel Crankshaft by using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Symposium on International Automotive Technology 2013, SAE International, Paper No. 2013-26-0141. (xxvii) Fatigue strength and Life Prediction of Forged Steel Crankshaft by using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, 9th - 12th January 2013, SIAT, India, Paper No. SAE-2012-26-0043. (xxviii) Evaluation of FEM based fracture mechanics technique to estimate life of an automotive forged steel crankshaft of a single cylinder diesel engine, Rajesh M. Metkar, Vivek K. Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Vidya Sagar Anki, Mahendra Dumpa, 3rd Nirma University International Conference on Engineering (NUiCONE 2012), will be published in Procedia Engineering (2012), ELSEVIER. (xxix) Multidimensional Modeling of Direct Injection Diesel Engine with Multiple Stage Fuel Injections, Subhash Deo Hiwase, S. Moorthy, Hari Prasad, Mahendra Dumpa, Rajesh M. Metkar, 3rd Nirma University International Conference on Engineering (NUiCONE 2012), will be published in Procedia Engineering (2012), ELSEVIER. (xxx) Excellence through Quality
  17. 17. 18 Dr. Subhash Deo 17 (xxx) Comparative Evaluation of Fatigue Assessment Techniques on a Forged Steel Crankshaft of a Single Cylinder Diesel Engine, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, Proceedings of the ASME 2012, International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition IMECE2012, IMECE2012-85493, November 9-15, 2012, Houston, Texas, USA. (xxxi) Fatique analysis and life estimation of crankshaft – A review, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, International Journal of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, (IJMME), Vol.6 (2011), No.3, pp. 425-430, ISSN 1823-0334, Indexed by Scopus. (xxxii) Modal Analysis for high cycle fatique life estimation of crankshaft, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, ISSN 0973-4562, Volume 6, Number 21 (2011) pp. 2485-2490. (xxxiii) Prediction of Fatigue Failure in Engineering Component by using Critical Distance Approach, Rajesh Metkar, Vivek Sunnapwar, Subhash Deo Hiwase, International Review of Mechanical Engineering (I.RE.M.E.), November 2011, Vol. 05, n. 7, pp 1254-1257, ISSN:1970-8734. (xxxiv)Entropy Balance and Exergy Analysis of Droplet Combustion and Modeling of In-Cylinder Processes in a Reciprocating Four Stroke Direct Combustion Diesel Engine, S.D.Hiwase, Ph.D. Thesis, IIT, Kharagpur, India. (xxxv) Entropy Balance and Exergy Analysis of the Process of Droplet Combustion, S.D.Hiwase, A.Dutta, S.K.Som, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics 31 (1998) 1601-1610, Printed in UK. (xxxvi)Entropy Balance and Exergy Analysis of the Process of Droplet Combustion, S.D.Hiwase, A.Dutta, S.K.Som, ISHMT-ASME, Heat and Mass Transfer Conference, 1997, IIT Kanpur, India. (xxxvii) IC Engine combustion Modeling Methodology and Practice, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, XVII National Conference on I.C. Engines and Combustion, Dec 2001, NIT, Surathkal, India. (xxxviii) The Recent CFD Meshing Techniques in Aerospace Engineering, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, Annual Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Symposium, 2002, GTRE, Bangalore, India. (xxxix)The use of Computational Fluid Mechanics Technology in Automotive Industry, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, One Day National Workshop on Emerging Trends in Information Technology in Automotive Industry, October 24, 2002, SAE India, IIT Chennai, India. (xl) Recent Advances in CFD Modeling of an IC Engine, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, In house Toptech Program on Diesel Engine Technology for CVRDE Engineers and Scientists, December, 2-6, 2002, SAE India, Southern India Section, CVRDE, Chennai, India. (xli) External Aerodynamic Study of a Wing Structure, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, Annual Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Symposium, 2003, IISc Bangalore, India. (xlii) An Overview on V2F Turbulence model, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, 2003, Lecture at Mechanical Engineering Department, IIT Chennai. Excellence through Quality
  18. 18. 19 Dr. Subhash Deo 18 (xliii) CFD Simulation of Calendria Flow and Temperature Distribution Inside Nuclear Reactor, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., 30th National Conference on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power, December 11-13, 2003, NIT Surathkal, India. (xliv) Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of the Flow Inside a Model Can -Type Gas Turbine Combustor by using STAR-CD, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., 18th National & 7th ISHMT-ASME, Heat and Mass Transfer Conference, January 4 - 6, 2006, IIT Guwahati, India. (xlv) Optimization of Foot Rest Assembly of a Three-Wheeler Automobile, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., International Conference on Recent Developments in Structural Engineering (RDSE – 2007), 30, 31 August and 01 September 2007, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal – 576 104, Karnataka, India. (xlvi) FEA Analysis on Calibration and Performance of Non-Linear Elastomer Engine Mounts, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., International Conference on Recent Developments in Structural Engineering (RDSE–2007), 30, 31 August and 01 September 2007, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal–576 104, Karnataka, India. (xlvii) Development of 395 CC DI Diesel Engine to meet proposed BS-III Emission norms, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., International Conference & XX National Conference on I.C. Engines and Combustion, December 6-9, 2007, JNTU Hyderabad, India. (xlviii) CNG – Gasoline Bi-Fuel Air Cooled Engine Development for Compliance with Proposed Bharat Stage -III Norms, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., International Conference & XX National Conference on I.C. Engines and Combustion, December 6-9, 2007, JNTU Hyderabad, India. (xlix) Multidimensional Modeling of Direct Injection Diesel Engine with Multiple Injections, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., International Conference & XX National Conference on I.C. Engines and Combustion, December 6-9, 2007, JNTU Hyderabad, India. (l) Modeling of In-Cylinder Processes in a DI Diesel Engine and Study of Influence of Operating Parameters on Performance and Emission Characteristics, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., International Conference & XX National Conference on I.C. Engines and Combustion, December 6-9, 2007, JNTU Hyderabad, India. (li) Comparative Study of Turbulence Models in a Gas Turbine Combustor by using Fluent, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., 19th National & 8th ISHMT-ASME, Heat and Mass Transfer Conference, January 3 - 5, 2008, JNTU College of Engineering, Hyderabad, India. (lii) A Study of Gas-Solid Heat transfer in Cyclone Heat Exchanger by using CFD, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase et. al., 19th National & 8th ISHMT-ASME, Heat and Mass Transfer Conference, January 3 - 5, 2008, JNTU College of Engineering, Hyderabad, India. (liii) Recent Trends in IC Engine Combustion Modeling, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, A three day National Workshop on Emerging Trends in Automobile Engineering, 03-05 July 2008 at NIT Warangal. Excellence through Quality
  19. 19. 20 Dr. Subhash Deo 19 (liv) Business Plan on Engineering Services Company in India – A complete business plan for opening an Engineering Services Company in India, including the timeline and financials by Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, Published on net. (lv) Indian Scenario of Engineering Services Outsourcing (ESO) Business in India - A study on the potential of outsourcing engineering services to India, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, Published on net. (lvi) Applications of Product Life Cycle management Technique and Procedures in a New Product Development Environment, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, National Seminar Cum Exposition on New Product Development, Confederation of Indian Industry, CII-CFM, 16-17 Sep 2010, Hotel Fortune, Hyderabad, India. (lvii) PLM Based Automotive Engineering Simulations, Dr. Subhash Deo Hiwase, National Conference on Recent Trends in Mechanical Engineering, 4-5 November 2011, Gyan Ganga Institute of technology and Management, Bhopal, India. (lviii) Genesis of Fluid Mechanics and Computational Fluid Mechanics, Faculty Development Program on ―ALTERNATE FUELS FOR IC ENGINES‖, 12-15 March 2012, Organized by Department of Mechanical Engineering Poojya Doddappa Appa College of Engineering (An Autonomous Institution Approved by AICTE, Accredited by NBA & Affiliated to VTU Belguaum, Gulbarga, Karnataka, Supported & canalized by Vision Group on Science & Technology, Government of Karnataka, Bangalore & Vishvesvaraya Technological University, Belgaum. (lix) Recent Trends in IC Engine Combustion Modeling, Faculty Development Program on ―ALTERNATE FUELS FOR IC ENGINES‖, 12-15 March 2012, Organized by Department of Mechanical Engineering Poojya Doddappa Appa College of Engineering (An Autonomous Institution Approved by AICTE, Accredited by NBA & Affiliated to VTU Belguaum, Gulbarga, Karnataka, Supported & canalized by Vision Group on Science & Technology, Government of Karnataka, Bangalore & Vishvesvaraya Technological University, Belgaum. (lx) An Overview on Axis and its Engineering Services Offerings – People, Process and Projects, 4th Annual TPO Conference, 9th June 2012, Rangrut.com, Hyderabad, http://rangrut.com/tpo-conference-hyderabad/speakers.php. (lxi) Automotive Product Life Cycle Management Trends and Practices, 31st July 2012, An Expert Technical Talk as a Chief Guest at Inaugural Function of Association of Mechanical Engineers (ASME & SAE Student Section), Vignan Institute of Technology & Science, Hyderabad, India. (lxii) Aeronautical Engineering – A way towards Future, 16-17 August 2012, An Inaugural Talk as a Chief Guest at Technical Fest–Vignan‘s Praudhyogiki-2K12, Vignan‘s Institute of Technology & Aeronautical Engineering, Hyderabad, India. Excellence through Quality
  20. 20. 21 Dr. Subhash Deo 20 (lxiii) Aero and Auto Modeling Methodologies, 21-22 September 2012, Mentoring of Aero Club Vignan at Technical Fest–Vignite-12, Vignan‘s Institute of Technology & Aeronautical Engineering, Hyderabad, India. (lxiv) Aero modelling show, 30-08-2013, Demonstration of the Flight of Aero-model at Sreenidhi Institute of Science and Technology at Roboveda-13, Sreenidhi Institute of Science and Technology, Hyderabad, India. (lxv) Aero and Auto Modeling Methodologies, 23-01-2014, Mentoring of Aero and Auto Club at Technical Fest, SR Engineering College, Warangal, India. (lxvi)Aero and Auto Modeling Methodologies, 31-01-2014, Mentoring of Aero and Auto Club at Technical Fest, Sagar Institute of Science and Technology, Hyderabad, India. Excellence through Quality
  21. 21. 22 Samrachana Engineering Services & Sourcing Solutions Pvt. Ltd. Road No.1, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad - 500 005 (AP) • Phone: +91 9949 6133 91 • Fax: +91 9949 6133 91 • subhash.deo.s@gmail.com • www.samrachana.com ABOUT SAMRACHANA Samrachana is an Engineering Services & Sourcing Solution Company. Its head office is located at Hyderabad. Samrachana is an independently governed organization founded by a team of qualified and experienced professionals from Industry and also partnering with several Industries and Institutions for their technology works. In addition, it represent globally through direct or our partners‘ offices in India and USA. Samrachana delivers complete engineering solutions to enterprises worldwide. Our service offerings combine the state-of-the-art technology, the best practices with the best of breed professionals. In essence, we provide the best return on investment (ROI) to our customers. Our development capabilities and partnerships with the leading technology companies, give us an edge in expertise and in our ability to deliver enterprise class technology solutions in all the relevant areas of our business groups Engineering & Engineering Enabled Services. We thrive on delivering managed services, solutions and products by intelligent application of current and emerging technologies. We work on cost-quality-time matrix to provide end-to-end solutions to the technology driven businesses across the globe with a perfectly balanced blend of experience, commitment, innovation and personal service to deliver professional and substantially remarkable results in Engineering & Manufacturing as well as Project Consulting and Outsourcing, which have made us evolve as an Enterprise Applications Consulting Associate. Combining proven expertise in the latest and ever emerging state-of-the-art technologies with a thorough understanding of new-economy business domains, we deliver complete solutions that create an environment suitable for a seamless flow of transactions with improved efficiency of operations and optimized performance. Our partnership with leading manufacturing houses has helped us build distinctive and functional competence to deliver unique competitive advantages to our enterprising customers over their competitors. With more than 5000 man-years of Services Experience of our flagship, we understand that the most effective services implementations are industry driven – hence we practice accordingly. Excellence through Quality

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