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Women in the medical profession Mr McDonald
Lesson Objectives: <ul><li>See how nursing developed  </li></ul><ul><li>See the impact of Florence Nightingale and Mary Se...
Nursing in the nineteenth century <ul><li>In 1850, nursing was seen as lowly occupation. </li></ul><ul><li>The reputation ...
Florence Nightingale <ul><li>Nightingale went to the Crimea where Britain was engaged in a war. </li></ul><ul><li>She had ...
Nightingale in the Crimea <ul><li>She wasn’t warmly welcomed at first by the army. </li></ul><ul><li>The army believed tha...
Nightingale’s legacy <ul><li>In 1859 she write Notes on Nursing which described her methods and rationale. </li></ul><ul><...
Mary Seacole <ul><li>Born in Jamaica in 1805. </li></ul><ul><li>She ran a boarding house for invalid soldiers. </li></ul><...
Mother Seacole <ul><li>She got her nickname from the soldiers she sold medicines too and treated. </li></ul><ul><li>She al...
Women Doctors <ul><li>Elizabeth Blackwell was an American born in Britain who attended New York University and received a ...
Women Doctors: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson <ul><li>Elizabeth Garrett Anderson worked first as a nurse. Then she tried to en...
Women Doctors: Sophia Jex-Blake <ul><li>She gained a place at Edinburgh University with four women in 1869. </li></ul><ul>...
Women in the 20 th  century <ul><li>Women continued to make a significant contribution in the twentieth century. </li></ul...
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Women In The Medical Profesion

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Transcript of "Women In The Medical Profesion"

  1. 1. Women in the medical profession Mr McDonald
  2. 2. Lesson Objectives: <ul><li>See how nursing developed </li></ul><ul><li>See the impact of Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole. </li></ul><ul><li>The impact of women as doctors in the nineteenth century. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Nursing in the nineteenth century <ul><li>In 1850, nursing was seen as lowly occupation. </li></ul><ul><li>The reputation of nurses was based on one of uncaring drunks with little training. </li></ul><ul><li>However steps were made to improve the reputation of nurses. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1853, Theodor Fliedner set up a training course for women of ‘good character’. </li></ul><ul><li>Elizabeth Fry, founded a nursing school in England. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Florence Nightingale <ul><li>Nightingale went to the Crimea where Britain was engaged in a war. </li></ul><ul><li>She had already had to fight her parents wishes to become a nurse and had run a nursing home for rich sick women. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1854, she was asked to go to Crimea and run a hospital for wounded British soldiers. </li></ul><ul><li>The conditions in Scutari were awful with disease and overcrowding rife. </li></ul><ul><li>She left Britain with a team of 38 nurses. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Nightingale in the Crimea <ul><li>She wasn’t warmly welcomed at first by the army. </li></ul><ul><li>The army believed that women did not bring discipline to the wounded men. </li></ul><ul><li>Nightingale worked on the hygiene of the hospital as well as sanitation, and food for the patients. </li></ul><ul><li>By early 1856 the death rate had fallen from 42% to just 2%! </li></ul><ul><li>When she returned to England, she became a beacon for the female nursing profession. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Nightingale’s legacy <ul><li>In 1859 she write Notes on Nursing which described her methods and rationale. </li></ul><ul><li>Nightingale was able by public funds to set up a nursing school. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards for nursing were established and nursing was seen in a more favourable light. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1900 there were 64,000 trained nurses and in 1919 the Registration of Nurses act was established which laid down qualifications nurses needed to enter nursing. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Mary Seacole <ul><li>Born in Jamaica in 1805. </li></ul><ul><li>She ran a boarding house for invalid soldiers. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1854 she went to England and said she was willing to go to the Crimea. </li></ul><ul><li>The government refused her request. </li></ul><ul><li>This was chiefly due to her race. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead she went to the Crimea on her own! She set up a medical store and tended to injured soldiers. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Mother Seacole <ul><li>She got her nickname from the soldiers she sold medicines too and treated. </li></ul><ul><li>She also met Florence Nightingale although she was not invited to join her team. </li></ul><ul><li>When she returned home she did not get the same treatment as Nightingale – again due to race. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead public sympathy helped secure her future income. She wrote a life story in 1857 and whilst she was well off when she died, no-one used her medical knowledge on nursing. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Women Doctors <ul><li>Elizabeth Blackwell was an American born in Britain who attended New York University and received a medical degree in 1849. </li></ul><ul><li>However most of the medical profession did not like women in the profession as they believed they were ‘too emotional’ for such work. </li></ul><ul><li>By the 1860s the attitude has changed due in part to the work by Nightingale and other key individuals (Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Sophia Jex-Blake) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Women Doctors: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson <ul><li>Elizabeth Garrett Anderson worked first as a nurse. Then she tried to enter medical school. She was rejected by every medical school. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1865 she was finally accepted by the Society of Apothecaries and soon had a large practice in London </li></ul><ul><li>Hard work and determination had paid off! </li></ul>
  11. 11. Women Doctors: Sophia Jex-Blake <ul><li>She gained a place at Edinburgh University with four women in 1869. </li></ul><ul><li>However they were soon dismissed by the Courts. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead she founded the London School of Medicine for Women in 1874 and gained a medical degree from Bern University. </li></ul><ul><li>She was also the first female doctor to set up practice in Scotland! </li></ul>
  12. 12. Women in the 20 th century <ul><li>Women continued to make a significant contribution in the twentieth century. </li></ul><ul><li>The two world wars allowed women to make a significant contribution to medicine. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1975 the Sex Discrimination Act made jobs such as doctors were to be given on the basis of skill rather than gender. </li></ul>
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