Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Wireless Networks
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Wireless Networks

308
views

Published on

It is a presentation on wireless networking. In this presentation the main topic is connection via Wi-Fi

It is a presentation on wireless networking. In this presentation the main topic is connection via Wi-Fi

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
308
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. A PRESENTATION ON WIRELESS NETWORKS Presented By:- Himanshu Derwal ID - 10EE020 ANAND INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING A PRESENTATION ON WIRELESS NETWORKS Presented By:- Himanshu Derwal ID - 10EE020 DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
  • 2. WIRELESS NETWORKSWIRELESS NETWORKS
  • 3. Management Center (Database large storage, analysis) BSC (Base Station Controller, Preprocessing)BTS Wireless Sensor Machine Monitoring Medical Monitoring Wireless SensorWireless Data Collection Networks Data Acquisition Network Animal Monitoring Vehicle Monitoring Wireless networks Submarine Monitoring PDA Wireless (Wi-Fi 802.11 2.4GHz BlueTooth Cellular Network, -CDMA, GSM) Data Distribution Network Printer Wireland (Ethernet WLAN, Optical) Online monitoring Server transmitter Any where to monitor and any where to access Notebook Cellular Phone PC
  • 4. Presentation Outline • History • Wireless Technology overview • The IEEE 802.11 WLAN Standards • Secure Wireless LANs • Migrating to Wireless LANs (Cutting the cord) • History • Wireless Technology overview • The IEEE 802.11 WLAN Standards • Secure Wireless LANs • Migrating to Wireless LANs (Cutting the cord)
  • 5. The beginning… • Most credit Guglielmo Marconi, “the father of radio”, with the initiation of wireless technology • 1894 Marconi experimented with Hertzian Waves (radio waves) to produce and detect waves over long distances • 1896 Marconi established the Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company, the first radio factory • 1901 St John’s, New Foundland, Marconi received the first trans-Atlantic wireless signal from Poldhu, England • 1905 the first distress signal sent using Morse Code • 1919 Radio Corporation of America (RCA) was incorporated, and consumer radio broadcasts for news and entertainment soon became popular • Most credit Guglielmo Marconi, “the father of radio”, with the initiation of wireless technology • 1894 Marconi experimented with Hertzian Waves (radio waves) to produce and detect waves over long distances • 1896 Marconi established the Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company, the first radio factory • 1901 St John’s, New Foundland, Marconi received the first trans-Atlantic wireless signal from Poldhu, England • 1905 the first distress signal sent using Morse Code • 1919 Radio Corporation of America (RCA) was incorporated, and consumer radio broadcasts for news and entertainment soon became popular
  • 6. US Military jumps into Wireless • During World War II the US Military used wireless signals with encryption to send battle plans and instructions • US Military started the shift to radio data transmission technology
  • 7. Wireless Networking: Birth of the Wireless Network • 1971 network technologies met radio technologies when the first wireless Local Area Network (LAN) was established at the University of Hawaii during the experiment, ‘ALOHANET’ • ALOHANET used a bidirectional star topology consisting of (7) computers over (4) islands • 1971 network technologies met radio technologies when the first wireless Local Area Network (LAN) was established at the University of Hawaii during the experiment, ‘ALOHANET’ • ALOHANET used a bidirectional star topology consisting of (7) computers over (4) islands
  • 8. Wireless Networking: Cellular • 1973 Dr Martin Cooper, Motorola Labs, invented the first personal mobile cellular telephone (weighed 2.5 lbs, 30 individual circuit boards, no display screen, 9”x5”x1.75”, 10 hours to charge for 35 minutes of use) • 1983 marked American entry into the commercial cellular service market • 1987 FCC allows and encourages cellular service providers to use alternate technologies in the 800Mhz radio spectrum to prompt use of digital transmission • 1973 Dr Martin Cooper, Motorola Labs, invented the first personal mobile cellular telephone (weighed 2.5 lbs, 30 individual circuit boards, no display screen, 9”x5”x1.75”, 10 hours to charge for 35 minutes of use) • 1983 marked American entry into the commercial cellular service market • 1987 FCC allows and encourages cellular service providers to use alternate technologies in the 800Mhz radio spectrum to prompt use of digital transmission
  • 9. Wireless Networking: IEEE • 1990 IEEE 802 Executive Committee established the 802.11 Working Group to create a wireless LAN standard. • 1997 working group approved IEEE 802.11 as the world’s first wireless LAN standard • New standards are continuously being developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers • 1990 IEEE 802 Executive Committee established the 802.11 Working Group to create a wireless LAN standard. • 1997 working group approved IEEE 802.11 as the world’s first wireless LAN standard • New standards are continuously being developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
  • 10. Wireless? • A wireless LAN or WLAN is a wireless local area network that uses radio waves as its carrier. • The last link with the users is wireless, to give a network connection to all users in a building or campus. • The backbone network usually uses cables • A wireless LAN or WLAN is a wireless local area network that uses radio waves as its carrier. • The last link with the users is wireless, to give a network connection to all users in a building or campus. • The backbone network usually uses cables
  • 11. How do wireless LANs work? Wireless LANs operate in almost the same way as wired LANs, using the same networking protocols and supporting the most of the same applications. Wireless LANs operate in almost the same way as wired LANs, using the same networking protocols and supporting the most of the same applications.
  • 12. How are WLANs Different? • They integrate into existing networks through access points which provide a bridging function • They let you stay connected as you roam from one coverage area to another • They have unique security considerations • They have specific interoperability requirements • They require different hardware • They offer performance that differs from wired LANs. • They integrate into existing networks through access points which provide a bridging function • They let you stay connected as you roam from one coverage area to another • They have unique security considerations • They have specific interoperability requirements • They require different hardware • They offer performance that differs from wired LANs.
  • 13. Integration With Existing Networks • Wireless Access Points (APs) - a small device that bridges wireless traffic to your network. • Most access points bridge wireless LANs into Ethernet networks, but Token-Ring options are available as well. • Wireless Access Points (APs) - a small device that bridges wireless traffic to your network. • Most access points bridge wireless LANs into Ethernet networks, but Token-Ring options are available as well.
  • 14. Integration With Existing Networks
  • 15. Roaming • Users maintain a continuous connection as they roam from one physical area to another • Mobile nodes automatically register with the new access point. • Methods: DHCP, Mobile IP • IEEE 802.11 standard does not address roaming, you may need to purchase equipment from one vendor if your users need to roam from one access point to another. • Users maintain a continuous connection as they roam from one physical area to another • Mobile nodes automatically register with the new access point. • Methods: DHCP, Mobile IP • IEEE 802.11 standard does not address roaming, you may need to purchase equipment from one vendor if your users need to roam from one access point to another.
  • 16. Security • In theory, spread spectrum radio signals are inherently difficult to decipher without knowing the exact hopping sequences or direct sequence codes used • The IEEE 802.11 standard specifies optional security called "Wired Equivalent Privacy" whose goal is that a wireless LAN offer privacy equivalent to that offered by a wired LAN. The standard also specifies optional authentication measures. • In theory, spread spectrum radio signals are inherently difficult to decipher without knowing the exact hopping sequences or direct sequence codes used • The IEEE 802.11 standard specifies optional security called "Wired Equivalent Privacy" whose goal is that a wireless LAN offer privacy equivalent to that offered by a wired LAN. The standard also specifies optional authentication measures.
  • 17. Hardware • PC Card, either with integral antenna or with external antenna/RF module. • ISA Card with external antenna connected by cable. • Handheld terminals • Access points • PC Card, either with integral antenna or with external antenna/RF module. • ISA Card with external antenna connected by cable. • Handheld terminals • Access points
  • 18. Hardware CISCO Aironet 350 series Wireless Handheld TerminalCISCO Aironet 350 series Semi Parabolic Antenna BreezeCOM AP
  • 19. Microstrain G-Sensor Microstrain Wireless Sensors Microstrain V-Link Transceiver Microstrain Transceiver Connect to PC RFID node
  • 20. Berkeley Crossbow Sensor Crossbow transceiver
  • 21. Performance • 802.11a offers speeds with a theoretically maximum rate of 54Mbps in the 5 GHz band • 802.11b offers speeds with a theoretically maximum rate of 11Mbps at in the 2.4 GHz spectrum band • 802.11g is a new standard for data rates of up to a theoretical maximum of 54 Mbps at 2.4 GHz. • 802.11a offers speeds with a theoretically maximum rate of 54Mbps in the 5 GHz band • 802.11b offers speeds with a theoretically maximum rate of 11Mbps at in the 2.4 GHz spectrum band • 802.11g is a new standard for data rates of up to a theoretical maximum of 54 Mbps at 2.4 GHz.
  • 22. 802.11a Vs. 802.11b 802.11a vs. 802.11b 802.11a 802.11b Raw data rates Up to 54 Mbps (54, 48, 36, 24,18, 12 and 6 Mbps) Up to 11 Mbps (11, 5.5, 2, and 1 Mbps) Range 50 Meters 100 Meters Bandwidth UNII and ISM (5 GHz range) ISM (2.4000— 2.4835 GHz range) Modulation OFDM technology DSSS technology
  • 23. Authentication Means: • Based on cryptography • Non-cryptographic • Both are identity-based verification mechanisms (devices request access based on the SSID – Service Set Identifier of the wireless network). Means: • Based on cryptography • Non-cryptographic • Both are identity-based verification mechanisms (devices request access based on the SSID – Service Set Identifier of the wireless network).
  • 24. Security Problems • Security features in Wireless products are frequently not enabled. • Use of static WEP keys (keys are in use for a very long time). WEP does not provide key management. • Cryptographic keys are short. • No user authentication occurs – only devices are authenticated. A stolen device can access the network. • Identity based systems are vulnerable. • Packet integrity is poor. • Security features in Wireless products are frequently not enabled. • Use of static WEP keys (keys are in use for a very long time). WEP does not provide key management. • Cryptographic keys are short. • No user authentication occurs – only devices are authenticated. A stolen device can access the network. • Identity based systems are vulnerable. • Packet integrity is poor.
  • 25. Antenna Selection and Placement • Permanently attached. • Remote antennas connected using an antenna cable. • Coax cable used for RF has a high signal loss, should not be mounted more than a 1 or 2 meters away from the device. • Placement: consider building construction, ceiling height, obstacles, and aesthetics. Different materials (cement, steel) have different radio propagation characteristics. • Permanently attached. • Remote antennas connected using an antenna cable. • Coax cable used for RF has a high signal loss, should not be mounted more than a 1 or 2 meters away from the device. • Placement: consider building construction, ceiling height, obstacles, and aesthetics. Different materials (cement, steel) have different radio propagation characteristics.
  • 26. Vendor Information • CISCO Systems Wireless http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/44/jump/wi reless.shtml • 3Com Wireless http://www.3com.com/products/en_US/prodlist .jsp?tab=cat&pathtype=purchase&cat=13&selcat =Wireless+Products • Breeze Wireless Communications http://www.breezecom.com • Lucent Technologies http://www.wavelan.com • Symbol Technologies http://www.symbol.com • CISCO Systems Wireless http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/44/jump/wi reless.shtml • 3Com Wireless http://www.3com.com/products/en_US/prodlist .jsp?tab=cat&pathtype=purchase&cat=13&selcat =Wireless+Products • Breeze Wireless Communications http://www.breezecom.com • Lucent Technologies http://www.wavelan.com • Symbol Technologies http://www.symbol.com
  • 27. References • CISCO Packet Magazine, 2nd Quarter 2002 http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac123/ac11 4/ac173/ac168/about_cisco_packet_issue_home. html • 3Com University – Wireless LANs A Technology Overview www.3com.com/3comu • National Institute of Standards and Technology Wireless Network Security http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/drafts/draft- sp800-48.pdf • CISCO Packet Magazine, 2nd Quarter 2002 http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac123/ac11 4/ac173/ac168/about_cisco_packet_issue_home. html • 3Com University – Wireless LANs A Technology Overview www.3com.com/3comu • National Institute of Standards and Technology Wireless Network Security http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/drafts/draft- sp800-48.pdf
  • 28. QueryQuery
  • 29. Thank YouThank You