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Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
Power point method
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Power point method

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  1. NAMA : ELLA RAHAYU SEMESTER/UNIT : VI/6 METHOD OF TEACHING ENGLISH
  2. SITUATIONAL LANGUAGE TEACHING
  3. Developed by British in the 1930s to the 1960s. 1. Developed by British in the 1930s to the 1960s.
  4. The language that is being taught is realistic, all the words and sentences must grow out of some real situation or imagined real situation.
  5. THE ASPECTS OF APPROACH Vocabulary control Grammar control
  6. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF APPROACH Language teaching begins with the spoken language. The target language is the language of the classroom. New language points are introduced situationally. Vocabulary selection procedures are followed. Items of grammar are graded following the principle that simple forms should be taught before complex ones. Reading and writing are introduced once sufficient lexical and grammatical basis is established.
  7. Approach Design
  8. a. Theory of language It can be characterized as a type of British “structuralism”.It can be characterized as a type of British “structuralism”. Language as speech/Language was identified with speech,Language as speech/Language was identified with speech, and speech ability was approached through oral practice ofand speech ability was approached through oral practice of structure.structure. b. Theory of learningb. Theory of learning Behaviorist habit-learning theory. Primarily processes rather than the conditions of learning.
  9. 2. DESIGN a. OBJECTIVES  A practical command of the four basic skills of a language through structure  Accuracy in both pronunciation and grammar  Errors are to be avoided at all costs  Automatic control of basic structures and sentence patterns
  10. b. THE SYLLABUS Structural syllabus A word list c. TYPES OF LEARNING AND TEACHING ACTIVITIES  A situational presentation of new sentence patterns  A drill-based manner of practicing ( chorus repetition, dictation, controlled oral- based reading and writing tasks)
  11. d. Learner roles  Listening and repeating what the teacher says  Responding to questions and commands  No control over the content of learning e. Teacher roles ♦ A model (modeling the new structure for students to repeat) ♦ A skillful manipulator (using questions, commands, etc to make the learner produce correct sentences) ♦ A review organizer (timing, oral practice, revision, testing and developing language activities)
  12. f. The role of instructional materials A textbook (as a guide) Visual aids (wall charts, flashcards, pictures, stick figures and so on)
  13. 3. Procedure a. Procedures move from controlled to freer practice of structures. b. Procedures move from oral use of sentence patterns to their automatic use in speech, reading and writing.
  14. 4. Advantages  Suitable for introduction to the language  Values practical grammar and vocabulary  An accessible method for teachers if they have good curriculum  Inexpensive to use 5. Disadvantages •Teacher-controlled •Ineffective •Boring

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