SCC 301 WEEK 1
How Media Firms and Markets
Operate.
Media Company definition
 A media company is a company that is
specialised in production and delivery of media in
the for...
What is a Media Company
today?
 1) Tolman Geffs, Managing Director, The
Jordan, Edmiston Group, Inc.: "Media companies
br...
What is a Media Company
today?
 2) A former journalist turned technologist at a
major media company: "I define a media
co...
What is a Media Company
today?
 3)David M. Scott, Freshspot Marketing LLC: "A
media company should be defined not by
tech...
 Based on this definition, I believe that
Amazon.com is a highly successful media
company because it aggregates an audien...
Media Markets
 A media market is a region where the population
can receive the same (or similar) television and
radio sta...
Media Market & Audience
 Media markets are widely used in audience
measurements, which are compiled in the United
States ...
 Markets are identified by the largest city, which
are usually located in the center of the market
region.
 Geography an...
 AM band and FM band radio ratings are
sometimes separated, as are broadcast and
cable television.
 Market researchers a...
Changing Media Markets
 According to Robert G. Picard, (academic expert
on media economics) there is a shift of media
mar...
Technology and Media Markets
 Seth Norton (Prof. Business) believes the media
market is more competitive than ever and ne...
 Viewership of TV stations and use of the Internet
are also shaping the market.
 “It gets tricky as to what constitutes ...
James Bond & Sony
Relevance of the phone?
 April 13, 2011 – Sony Pictures Entertainment will
remain in the James Bond business after
reachi...
Reflection Paper
 Consider the classroom analysis of the James
Bond film, „Skyfall‟ and the Sony Xperia mobile
phone. Sea...
Details of your Reflection Paper
1. The films „Skyfall‟ and „Man of Steel‟ have both
signed content distribution deals wit...
Week 1 how media firms and markets operate
Week 1 how media firms and markets operate
Week 1 how media firms and markets operate
Week 1 how media firms and markets operate
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Week 1 how media firms and markets operate

225 views

Published on

This presentation is focused on media companies and media markets. While there are standard definitions of these terms, it is evident that technology is making a difference in the way we define different sectors of the media. The aim is to understand the way technology is key in media growth, and reaching a wider audience by forming partnerships with other companies outside the media industry.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
225
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Week 1 how media firms and markets operate

  1. 1. SCC 301 WEEK 1 How Media Firms and Markets Operate.
  2. 2. Media Company definition  A media company is a company that is specialised in production and delivery of media in the form of digital, audio, video, print and events.  Media companies are designed to connect and strengthen the relationship between the medium's audience and the sponsor of the medium.  The media has long been referred to as the Fourth Estate. A societal or political force or institution whose influence is not consistently or officially recognized.
  3. 3. What is a Media Company today?  1) Tolman Geffs, Managing Director, The Jordan, Edmiston Group, Inc.: "Media companies bring content to audiences. That's what Google does, with the content comprising unique aggregated search results. Aggregation may seem like a new form of content, but directories have been around forever. Yes, Google is also a navigation tool. So is the telephone, but that does not mean that yellow pages directories are not
  4. 4. What is a Media Company today?  2) A former journalist turned technologist at a major media company: "I define a media company as an organization whose core competency is the CREATION of information content which is sold as a 'product' and disseminated to information consumers via one or more publishing technologies, including print publishing, radio & TV broadcasting, and internet publishing. ... I feel that CREATION is the key to defining a media company, as CREATORS and their content really define a media company's position in the marketplace and their corporate culture."
  5. 5. What is a Media Company today?  3)David M. Scott, Freshspot Marketing LLC: "A media company should be defined not by technology, nor business model (advertising- supported vs. paid), but rather by the audience. Any property that successfully aggregates an audience through content is a media company.
  6. 6.  Based on this definition, I believe that Amazon.com is a highly successful media company because it aggregates an audience by successfully delivering content from book publishers and product manufacturers (in the form of product definitions and specifications) as well as reviews of books and other products contributed by consumers." - David M. Scott
  7. 7. Media Markets  A media market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content.  Media markets can coincide or overlap with 1 or more metropolitan areas, though rural regions with few significant population centers can also be designated as markets.  Conversely, very large metropolitan areas can sometimes be subdivided into multiple segments. Market regions may overlap, meaning that people residing on the edge of one media market may be
  8. 8. Media Market & Audience  Media markets are widely used in audience measurements, which are compiled in the United States by Nielsen Media Research (television) and Arbitron (radio).
  9. 9.  Markets are identified by the largest city, which are usually located in the center of the market region.  Geography and the fact that some metropolitan areas have large cities separated by some distance can make markets have unusual shapes and result in two, three, or more names being used to identify a single region (such as Langata- Kibera, Nairobi;).  In North America, radio markets are generally a bit smaller than their television counterparts, as broadcast power restrictions are stricter for radio than TV, and TV reaches further via cable.  This information is used by advertisers to determine how to reach a specific audience.
  10. 10.  AM band and FM band radio ratings are sometimes separated, as are broadcast and cable television.  Market researchers also subdivide ratings demographically between different age groups, genders, and ethnic backgrounds; as well as psychographically (study of personality, values, attitudes, interests, and lifestyles) between income levels and other non- physical factors.  In countries such as the United Kingdom, a government body defines the media markets. In the United States, media regions are defined by a privately held institution, without government
  11. 11. Changing Media Markets  According to Robert G. Picard, (academic expert on media economics) there is a shift of media market definitions from traditional platform-based definitions to functional definitions.  Media product platform definitions are losing their specificity and uniqueness due to digitalization and cross-platform distribution developments.  Newspapers are becoming news providers, delivering news and information via print, online, mobile, and other platforms; broadcasters are moving off the radio spectrum, exploiting not only other streaming and video-on-demand opportunities, but also text- based communication on web and mobile
  12. 12. Technology and Media Markets  Seth Norton (Prof. Business) believes the media market is more competitive than ever and new forms of media are expanding the market, which will affect everyone in the media business.  “For people in the existing media it may cause some problems. It will affect your life, too. I view it favorably, and most people view it favorably as consumers.”  Consumers have more options than ever to get news, a market is no longer defined by just a town's newspaper.
  13. 13.  Viewership of TV stations and use of the Internet are also shaping the market.  “It gets tricky as to what constitutes a market, I don't know the exact answer to that.” As people are seeking different media sources, like the Internet, media monopolies are weakened.  Media conglomerates like The New York Times and Chicago Tribune, companies that own newspapers, radio and television stations, aren't true conglomerates because they aren't expanding into other industries.  Media conglomerates tend to be narrower than traditional conglomerates in other industries, but they are getting broader by going into movie production and the Internet.
  14. 14. James Bond & Sony
  15. 15. Relevance of the phone?  April 13, 2011 – Sony Pictures Entertainment will remain in the James Bond business after reaching an agreement with MGM to co-finance and theatrically market and distribute Bond 23 worldwide, it was announced today by MGM Co- Chairmen and Chief Executive Officers Gary Barber and Roger Birnbaum and Sony Pictures Chairman and CEO Michael Lynton and Co- Chairman Amy Pascal.  Sony will release the next film (Skyfall) in this iconic franchise on November 9, 2012 throughout the world except for select International territories, where MGM will directly oversee distribution.
  16. 16. Reflection Paper  Consider the classroom analysis of the James Bond film, „Skyfall‟ and the Sony Xperia mobile phone. Search online for an article that details „Nokia and Warner Bros. Digital Distribution Announce Mobile Content Agreement‟
  17. 17. Details of your Reflection Paper 1. The films „Skyfall‟ and „Man of Steel‟ have both signed content distribution deals with mobile phone companies. What is the link between the Superman „Man of Steel‟ film and the Nokia Lumia phone? Do you notice any differences between the two deals? 2. Would you be interested in watching media content on your mobile phone? Why is this so? 3. Are such deals only relevant to developed nations or can they work in a country such as Kenya? Why do you think so?

×