What are learning styles? <ul><li>Learning styles are simply different approaches or ways of learning. </li></ul><ul><li>H...
What are the types of learning styles? <ul><li>Visual Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>learn through seeing ...                ...
<ul><li>Auditory Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>learn through listening...   </li></ul><ul><li>They learn best through verbal...
<ul><li>Tactile/Kinesthetic Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>learn through , moving, doing and touching...      </li></ul><ul><...
What is Multiple Intelligence? <ul><li>Conceived by Howard Gardner, Multiple Intelligences are seven different ways to dem...
<ul><li>Visual/Spatial Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to perceive the visual . These learners tend to think in pic...
<ul><li>Verbal/Linguistic Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to use words and language.  These learners have highly de...
<ul><li>Logical/Mathematical Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to use reason, logic and numbers.  These learners thin...
<ul><li>Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to control body movements and handle objects skillfully....
<ul><li>Musical/Rhythmic Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to produce and appreciate music.  These musically inclined...
<ul><li>Interpersonal Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to relate and understand others . These learners try to see t...
<ul><li>Intrapersonal Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to self-reflect and be aware of one's inner state of being.  ...
Brain Based Education
Principles of Brain-Based Learning <ul><li>Malleable memories </li></ul><ul><li>Memories are often not encoded at all, enc...
<ul><li>Reward and addiction dependency  </li></ul><ul><li>Humans have a natural craving for positive feelings, including ...
<ul><li>Brain seeks and creates understanding </li></ul><ul><li>The human brain is a meaning-maker and meaning seeker. The...
<ul><li>Input Limitations  </li></ul><ul><li>Several physical structures and processes limit one’s ability to take in cont...
<ul><li>Malleability/Neural Plasticity  </li></ul><ul><li>The brain changes every day and more importantly, we influence t...
<ul><li>Information obtained from the following sites </li></ul><ul><li>Eric Jensen's Brain Expo </li></ul><ul><li>Howtole...
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What Are Learning Styles

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Learning Styles of students in the classroom

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What Are Learning Styles

  1. 1. What are learning styles? <ul><li>Learning styles are simply different approaches or ways of learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Howtolearn.com - Unleash The Hidden Power of Your Unique Learning Style! </li></ul>
  2. 2. What are the types of learning styles? <ul><li>Visual Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>learn through seeing ...                    . </li></ul><ul><li>These learners need to see the teacher's body language and facial expression to fully understand the content of a lesson. They tend to prefer sitting at the front of the classroom to avoid visual obstructions (e.g. people's heads). They may think in pictures and learn best from visual displays including: diagrams, illustrated text books, overhead transparencies, videos, flipcharts and hand-outs.  During a lecture or classroom discussion, visual learners often prefer to take detailed notes to absorb the information. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Auditory Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>learn through listening... </li></ul><ul><li>They learn best through verbal lectures, discussions, talking things through and listening to what others have to say. Auditory learners interpret the underlying meanings of speech through listening to tone of voice, pitch, speed and other nuances. Written information may have little meaning until it is heard. These learners often benefit from reading text aloud and using a tape recorder. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Tactile/Kinesthetic Learners: </li></ul><ul><li>learn through , moving, doing and touching...    </li></ul><ul><li>Tactile/Kinesthetic persons learn best through a hands-on approach, actively exploring the physical world around them. They may find it hard to sit still for long periods and may become distracted by their need for activity and exploration. </li></ul>
  5. 5. What is Multiple Intelligence? <ul><li>Conceived by Howard Gardner, Multiple Intelligences are seven different ways to demonstrate intellectual ability. </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple Intelligences -- Assessment </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Visual/Spatial Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to perceive the visual . These learners tend to think in pictures and need to create vivid mental images to retain information. They enjoy looking at maps, charts, pictures, videos, and movies. </li></ul><ul><li>Their skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>puzzle building, reading, writing, understanding charts and graphs, a good sense of direction, sketching, painting, creating visual metaphors and analogies (perhaps through the visual arts), manipulating images, constructing, fixing, designing practical objects, interpreting visual images. </li></ul><ul><li>Possible career interests: </li></ul><ul><li>navigators, sculptors, visual artists, inventors, architects, interior designers, mechanics, engineers </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Verbal/Linguistic Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to use words and language. These learners have highly developed auditory skills and are generally elegant speakers. They think in words rather than pictures. </li></ul><ul><li>Their skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>listening, speaking, writing, story telling, explaining, teaching, using humor, understanding the syntax and meaning of words, remembering information, convincing someone of their point of view, analyzing language usage. </li></ul><ul><li>Possible career interests: </li></ul><ul><li>Poet, journalist, writer, teacher, lawyer, politician, translator </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Logical/Mathematical Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to use reason, logic and numbers. These learners think conceptually in logical and numerical patterns making connections between pieces of information. Always curious about the world around them, these learner ask lots of questions and like to do experiments. </li></ul><ul><li>Their skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>problem solving, classifying and categorizing information, working with abstract concepts to figure out the relationship of each to the other, handling long chains of reason to make local progressions, doing controlled experiments, questioning and wondering about natural events, performing complex mathematical calculations, working with geometric shapes </li></ul><ul><li>Possible career paths: </li></ul><ul><li>Scientists, engineers, computer programmers, researchers, accountants, mathematicians </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Bodily/Kinesthetic Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to control body movements and handle objects skillfully. These learners express themselves through movement. They have a good sense of balance and eye-hand co-ordination. (e.g. ball play, balancing beams). Through interacting with the space around them, they are able to remember and process information. </li></ul><ul><li>Their skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>dancing, physical co-ordination, sports, hands on experimentation, using body language, crafts, acting, miming, using their hands to create or build, expressing emotions through the body </li></ul><ul><li>Possible career paths: </li></ul><ul><li>Athletes, physical education teachers, dancers, actors, firefighters, artisans </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Musical/Rhythmic Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to produce and appreciate music. These musically inclined learners think in sounds, rhythms and patterns. They immediately respond to music either appreciating or criticizing what they hear. Many of these learners are extremely sensitive to environmental sounds (e.g. crickets, bells, dripping taps). </li></ul><ul><li>Their skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>singing, whistling, playing musical instruments, recognizing tonal patterns, composing music, remembering melodies, understanding the structure and rhythm of music </li></ul><ul><li>Possible career paths: </li></ul><ul><li>musician, disc jockey, singer, composer </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Interpersonal Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to relate and understand others . These learners try to see things from other people's point of view in order to understand how they think and feel. They often have an uncanny ability to sense feelings, intentions and motivations. They are great organizers, although they sometimes resort to manipulation. Generally they try to maintain peace in group settings and encourage co-operation. They use both verbal (e.g. speaking) and non-verbal language (e.g. eye contact, body language)  to open communication channels with others. </li></ul><ul><li>Their skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>seeing things from other perspectives (dual-perspective), listening, using empathy, understanding other people's moods and feelings, counseling, co-operating with groups, noticing people's moods, motivations and intentions, communicating both verbally and non-verbally, building trust, peaceful conflict resolution, establishing positive relations with other people. </li></ul><ul><li>Possible Career Paths: </li></ul><ul><li>Counselor, salesperson, politician, business person </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Intrapersonal Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>ability to self-reflect and be aware of one's inner state of being. These learners try to understand their inner feelings, dreams, relationships with others, and strengths and weaknesses. </li></ul><ul><li>Their Skills include: </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing their own strengths and weaknesses, reflecting and analyzing themselves, awareness of their inner feelings, desires and dreams, evaluating their thinking patterns, reasoning with themselves, understanding their role in relationship to others </li></ul><ul><li>Possible Career Paths: </li></ul><ul><li>Researchers, theorists, philosophers </li></ul>
  13. 13. Brain Based Education
  14. 14. Principles of Brain-Based Learning <ul><li>Malleable memories </li></ul><ul><li>Memories are often not encoded at all, encoded poorly, changed or not retrieved. The result is that students rarely remember what we think they should. Memories are strengthened by frequency, intensity and practice under varying conditions and contexts. </li></ul><ul><li>Non-conscious experience runs automatic behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>The complexity of the human body requires that we automate many behaviors. The more we automate, the less we are aware of them. Most of our behaviors have come from either “undisputed downloads” from our environment or repeated behaviors that have become automatic. This suggests potential problems and opportunities in learning. </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Reward and addiction dependency </li></ul><ul><li>Humans have a natural craving for positive feelings, including novelty, fun, reward and personal relationships. There is a natural instinct to limit pain even if it means compromising our integrity. For complex learning to occur, students need to defer gratification and develop the capability to go without an immediate reward. </li></ul><ul><li>Attentional Limitations </li></ul><ul><li>Most people cannot pay attention very long, except during flow states, because they cannot hold much information in their short-term memory. It is difficult for people to maintain focus for extended periods of time. Emotions, meaning making, ultradian rhythms and glucose uptake all affect attention span. Some brain mechanisms facilitate attention by processing the desired areas and others facilitate attention by inhibiting unwanted inputs. Adapting the content to match the learner provides better attention and motivation to learn. </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>Brain seeks and creates understanding </li></ul><ul><li>The human brain is a meaning-maker and meaning seeker. The more important the meaning, the greater the attention one must pay in order to influence the content of the meaning. </li></ul><ul><li>Rough Drafts </li></ul><ul><li>Brains rarely get complex learning right the first time. Instead they often sacrifice accuracy for simply developing a “rough draft” of the learning material. If, over time, the learning material maintains or increases in its importance and relevance, the brain will upgrade the rough draft to improve meaning and accuracy. To this end, prior knowledge changes how the brain organizes new information. Goal-driven learning proceeds more rapidly than random learning. Learning is enhanced by brain mechanisms with contrasting output and input goals. </li></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>Input Limitations </li></ul><ul><li>Several physical structures and processes limit one’s ability to take in continuous new learning. The “slow down” mechanisms include the working memory, the synaptic formation time for complex encoding and the hippocampus. </li></ul><ul><li>Perception influences our experience </li></ul><ul><li>A person’s experience of life is highly subjective. Many studies show how people are easily influenced to change how we see and what we hear, feel, smell and taste. This subjectivity alters experience, which alters perception. When a person changes the way they perceive the world, they alter their experience. It is experience that drives change in the brain. </li></ul>
  18. 18. <ul><li>Malleability/Neural Plasticity </li></ul><ul><li>The brain changes every day and more importantly, we influence those changes. New areas of brain plasticity and overall malleability are regularly discovered. It is known that experience can drive physical changes in the sensory cortex, frontal lobes, temporal lobes, amygdala and hippocampus. In addition whole systems can adapt to experience such as the reward system or stress response system. </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional-Physical State Dependency </li></ul><ul><li>Both emotional and body states influence attention, memory, learning, meaning and behavior. These states become more stable over time and will resist change. For example, the longer one is angry or depressed, the more comfortable he or she becomes with that state. This has profound implications for the social and behavioral role of education. </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Information obtained from the following sites </li></ul><ul><li>Eric Jensen's Brain Expo </li></ul><ul><li>Howtolearn.com - Unleash The Hidden Power of Your Unique Learning Style! </li></ul>
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