“ It’s OK to get a ‘C’”—Differentiated Grading in the general education classroom Presenter: Baylor Del Rosario Based on t...
What is Differentiated Grading?   <ul><li>·  Curriculum Layering is one type of differentiated instruction. </li></ul><ul>...
Why Differentiate Grading?  <ul><li>Teachers must teach to a variety of students— </li></ul><ul><li>·  Multiple languages ...
Advantages <ul><li>One size does NOT fit all. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards/requirements are present (everyone has to do at ...
HOW TO BEGIN <ul><li>Introduce gradually (with what you do now and add one component). Don’t try and do this for ALL activ...
What Does Differentiated Grading Look Like?   <ul><li>Students pick and choose on a “menu” (see handout) of a C, B or A gr...
C  Grade <ul><li>Basic knowledge, understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself, “What concept[s] are a must?” </li></ul>
B  Grade <ul><li>Application or manipulation of the information learned or covered in the C Grade. </li></ul><ul><li>Add  ...
A  Grade ·  Critical Thinking and Analysis.  ·  This level can require students to critically analyze a real-world current...
Do you Differentiate? <ul><li>Administrators are sometimes at a loss on teacher-observations—there are all kids of activit...
Some Questions <ul><li>Q:  What do you do with students who finish the C Grade and then quit? </li></ul><ul><li>A:  Try no...
Some Questions <ul><li>Q:  What do you do if a student absolutely cannot comprehend basic concepts at his/her grade level ...
Some Questions <ul><li>Q:  What do you do if a student is capable, but does not want to work on what he/she is asked to do...
Sources <ul><li>·   Law, Kay. (Oct. 18, 2004) Seminar.  Strengthening Instruction for Gifted Students Through Differentiat...
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Differentiated Grading Layering Slides

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Using Differentiated Grading in the classroom.

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  • Example: Ask audience if they have ever taken college level English course beyond English 1A and 1B? Ask audience, “Is it typical/normal for everyone in the course to receive a letter grade ‘A’?” The point is not everyone deserves an “A”. The point is that students need to take responsibility for their learning? The point is teachers shouldn’t have to nag students to keep working—if we set up clear criteria for earing each grade, then our work is done!
  • Comment: Not all 5 th graders are at grade-level for example. However, all of them (unless they are on the alternate curriculum—only 1%) are expected to take the CRTs so they need the basics at the very least. Another example (put on board for people to see) if we are working in Investigations and students are being taught “Arrays” for 18 x 14 (as shown in the teacher’s manual) we could present: A grade = Show latice array for 18x14, 20x10, and 5x2 B grade = Show lattice array for 20x10 and 5x2 C grade = Show lattice array for 5x2 (the best this kid can hope for on this assignment is a C and that is OK!).
  • Comments: Teacher must make sure expectations for each assignment are clear to all students. Allow students to self-determine (with encouragement) their level of work. Less “teacher control” MORE “student control.” Provide the handout (take a math investigations lesson/literally a lesson that is taking place in the building and break up for people of paper). #4 HAS TO BE KID FRIENDLY. KIDS NEED TO KNOW/READ WHAT THEY ARE WORKING FOR.
  • The very best part of layered curric. Is the one-on-one time you get with every student, everyday. You meet them face-to-face in their territory ( their desk, not yours) to build those wonderful relationships which drive us back to the classroom year after year. Layered Curric. Is student-centered. Most teacher evaluation check sheets are teacher-centered. Observers are trained to watch the actions of the teacher and who they start, sustain, and close the day’s lesson. It is a bit of challenge for them in a room where the students have the main role. Certainly, you will always be their coach, but learning is an active participation sport. No one wants to enjoy basketball by watching the coaches demonstrate the technique all day, everyday. They want to play. So do students. Set the boundaries, establish the goals, then give them the playing field.
  • Differentiated Grading Layering Slides

    1. 1. “ It’s OK to get a ‘C’”—Differentiated Grading in the general education classroom Presenter: Baylor Del Rosario Based on the “Layering the Curriculum” work by Kathie Nunley
    2. 2. What is Differentiated Grading? <ul><li>· Curriculum Layering is one type of differentiated instruction. </li></ul><ul><li>· It allows students to learn at their own level and using their own learning style. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why Differentiate Grading? <ul><li>Teachers must teach to a variety of students— </li></ul><ul><li>·  Multiple languages </li></ul><ul><li>·  Various cultures </li></ul><ul><li>·  Different learning styles </li></ul><ul><li>·  Individual abilities </li></ul><ul><li>·  Multiple levels of achievement </li></ul><ul><li>EVERYONE IS AT A DIFFERENCE PLACE ON THE “CONTINUUM” OF COMPETENCE IN A GIVEN AREA. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Advantages <ul><li>One size does NOT fit all. </li></ul><ul><li>Standards/requirements are present (everyone has to do at least “C-Level” work) but opportunity to do more—or not—is available (student responsibility). </li></ul><ul><li>Increase student responsibility. </li></ul>
    5. 5. HOW TO BEGIN <ul><li>Introduce gradually (with what you do now and add one component). Don’t try and do this for ALL activities in the school day. </li></ul><ul><li>Start with one or two units in a subject area (e.g., math). </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm with a special ed. Teacher or another general ed. Teacher. </li></ul>
    6. 6. What Does Differentiated Grading Look Like? <ul><li>Students pick and choose on a “menu” (see handout) of a C, B or A grade. </li></ul>
    7. 7. C Grade <ul><li>Basic knowledge, understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself, “What concept[s] are a must?” </li></ul>
    8. 8. B Grade <ul><li>Application or manipulation of the information learned or covered in the C Grade. </li></ul><ul><li>Add assortment of projects students can complete to demonstrate an application of the knowledge and skills gained in the level. Problem solving and other higher-level thinking tasks are met at this level. </li></ul>
    9. 9. A Grade · Critical Thinking and Analysis. · This level can require students to critically analyze a real-world current issue that relates to the unit of study. It requires the highest and most complex thinking. The upper echelons of Bloom’s taxonomy are met at this level.
    10. 10. Do you Differentiate? <ul><li>Administrators are sometimes at a loss on teacher-observations—there are all kids of activities happening at the same time. </li></ul><ul><li>By the middle of the year, students run the classroom as if my presence makes little difference! </li></ul>
    11. 11. Some Questions <ul><li>Q: What do you do with students who finish the C Grade and then quit? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Try not to give that as an option. Students are never allowed to just sit and do nothing. The only students who can earn a C are those few who really do take the entire time to complete the C Grade (a few, but not all special ed. Students, some ELL students, and some general ed. Students who are not familiar with our curriculum especially math). </li></ul>
    12. 12. Some Questions <ul><li>Q: What do you do if a student absolutely cannot comprehend basic concepts at his/her grade level for the curriculum being taught? </li></ul><ul><li>A: If a student is scheduled to take the CRT then he/she should be able to learn basic concepts of the curriculum using differentiated grading. The alternate assessment is reserved for those with “severe cognitive impairments.” if this Is the case speak with the student’s casemanager. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Some Questions <ul><li>Q: What do you do if a student is capable, but does not want to work on what he/she is asked to do? </li></ul><ul><li>A: Provide more grading choices. Make it very clear (in writing) for everyone what the expectations are to earn a C, B, or A on an assignment. You may want to do this for letter grades D and F if need be. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Sources <ul><li>· Law, Kay. (Oct. 18, 2004) Seminar. Strengthening Instruction for Gifted Students Through Differentiated Teaching Strategies K-12. El Paso, Texas. </li></ul><ul><li>· Nunley, Kathie. Dr. Kathie Nunley’s Layered Curriculum Web Site for Educators . http://www.help4teachers.com/ .  2004. Accessed Sep. 23, 2004. </li></ul>
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