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Social Media: Introduction to the Basics Webinar for Jan. 18, 2011

Social Media: Introduction to the Basics Webinar for Jan. 18, 2011

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  • Using Social Media to Build Buzz, Community and Support Do you have questions about using social media effectively? Is social media fully integrated into your communications plan? We will discuss social media plans, how to use the applications to further your cause, how to determine the right message for the audience and more. Bring your questions and we'll explore how to grow support for your organization though social media.
  • Beth’s overview… Those hours are per week folks! In december Demetrio will be back to talk about the rest of these boxes, or we can chat about some of the others but the focus of the discussion right now is just on the first box to the left. Who’s on what? Notice that there is overlap. Interesting facts that nonprofits are leaders in many of these. CMW-Springboard Aug. 14, 2008
  • So what tools to use? Where do you start?
  • What does it mean to you?
  • Many of you may have been wondering what this Orange button is on some websites. This button stands for RSS feed (or Really Simple Syndication). This is a new way to receive information. Rather than going back to a particular website every day to see if something has changes, RSS enables the information that has been updated to come to you.
  • I note the type of content and engagement. Questions Link to an article with a question Link to an article summarizing best tip Post w/ a live experiment or sharing something I did on the Fan Page  I've looked at frequency of posting and the sweet spot for me is 3-5 times per week.  I haven't analyze day of the week because it was extra piece of data to collect and was more interested in click thrus by day of the week and found a good secondary study . It is also important to track exactly how you promote your Facebook page and what helps you recruit more fans.  I keep notes on when I've tweeted a link, speaking dates, posting updates in my status about my fan page and all the multi-channel ways you need to promote your page. I also do the same sort of notes for different promotional techniques and I look at the increase (or decrease) in the number of fans: Suggest to friends Status updates Tagging photos Tagging a person Visiting other fan pages and participating Promoting through other channels (blog post, Twitter, speaking engagement, etc) I've also discovered that it is important to identify as many opportunities to set up experiments that you measure and learn as you go . This is where I've gleaned most of my insights - a combination of quantitative metrics culled from Insights and what people are saying on the page. As look back on my Facebook page experience, collecting some data points related to objectives and spending some time to think about what it means is very valuable.   What are you learning from your measurement strategy?   How have you kept your data collection trim, fit, and actionable?  What is the most compelling thing you learned about your Facebook Page through measurement?
  • I note the type of content and engagement. Questions Link to an article with a question Link to an article summarizing best tip Post w/ a live experiment or sharing something I did on the Fan Page  I've looked at frequency of posting and the sweet spot for me is 3-5 times per week.  I haven't analyze day of the week because it was extra piece of data to collect and was more interested in click thrus by day of the week and found a good secondary study . It is also important to track exactly how you promote your Facebook page and what helps you recruit more fans.  I keep notes on when I've tweeted a link, speaking dates, posting updates in my status about my fan page and all the multi-channel ways you need to promote your page. I also do the same sort of notes for different promotional techniques and I look at the increase (or decrease) in the number of fans: Suggest to friends Status updates Tagging photos Tagging a person Visiting other fan pages and participating Promoting through other channels (blog post, Twitter, speaking engagement, etc) I've also discovered that it is important to identify as many opportunities to set up experiments that you measure and learn as you go . This is where I've gleaned most of my insights - a combination of quantitative metrics culled from Insights and what people are saying on the page. As look back on my Facebook page experience, collecting some data points related to objectives and spending some time to think about what it means is very valuable.   What are you learning from your measurement strategy?   How have you kept your data collection trim, fit, and actionable?  What is the most compelling thing you learned about your Facebook Page through measurement?
  • I note the type of content and engagement. Questions Link to an article with a question Link to an article summarizing best tip Post w/ a live experiment or sharing something I did on the Fan Page  I've looked at frequency of posting and the sweet spot for me is 3-5 times per week.  I haven't analyze day of the week because it was extra piece of data to collect and was more interested in click thrus by day of the week and found a good secondary study . It is also important to track exactly how you promote your Facebook page and what helps you recruit more fans.  I keep notes on when I've tweeted a link, speaking dates, posting updates in my status about my fan page and all the multi-channel ways you need to promote your page. I also do the same sort of notes for different promotional techniques and I look at the increase (or decrease) in the number of fans: Suggest to friends Status updates Tagging photos Tagging a person Visiting other fan pages and participating Promoting through other channels (blog post, Twitter, speaking engagement, etc) I've also discovered that it is important to identify as many opportunities to set up experiments that you measure and learn as you go . This is where I've gleaned most of my insights - a combination of quantitative metrics culled from Insights and what people are saying on the page. As look back on my Facebook page experience, collecting some data points related to objectives and spending some time to think about what it means is very valuable.   What are you learning from your measurement strategy?   How have you kept your data collection trim, fit, and actionable?  What is the most compelling thing you learned about your Facebook Page through measurement?
  • What’s the difference between Twitter and Facebook? -use of hashtags # -there are common hashtags that people use #Michigan #nonprofit, etc to find things about Michigan and about nonprofits. It’s a great way to outreach to people who may be unfamiliar with your organization. Not Popular with Teens While teens are bigger users of almost all other online applications, Twitter is an exception. 8% of internet users ages 12‐17 use Twitter. This makes Twitter as common among teens as visiting a virtual world, and far less common than sending or receiving text messages as 66% of teens do, or going online for news and political information, done by 62% of online teens. Older teens are more likely to use Twitter than their younger counterparts; 10% of online teens ages 14‐17 do so, compared with 5% of those ages 12‐13. High school age girls are particularly likely to use Twitter. Thirteen percent of online girls ages 14‐17 use Twitter, compared with 7% of boys that age. Using different wording, we find that 19% of adult internet users use Twitter or similar services to post short status updates and view the updates of others online. Young adults lead the way when it comes to using Twitter or status updating. One‐third of online 18‐29 year olds post or read status updates.
  • Once you figure out what you tweet, you can get a sense of what’s working, what’s getting retweeted, when people are dropping off, etc.
  • “ The basics are what most organizations are missing. Obsessing about this is far more effective than managing the latest fad.” I didn’t say that, but I agree with it 100%. Marketing maven Seth Godin said it during a May 2008 online chat about nonprofit marketing hosted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Your online strategy will be a lot easier to create if you have the basics covered.
  • What people want is access, ultimately. They want to find information in under 1 minute Let them access their own hopes and dreams. Give them the technological tools and digital information to tell their friends in the way that they want to. Give them a sneak peek into the future, a backstage glimpe, or anything to keep them interested.

Intro to social media Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Allison Treppa [email_address] @highwayt & @MNAonline Social Media: Introduction to the Tools
  • 3. About Me
    • Allison Treppa
    • Director of Marketing & Communications
    • Michigan Nonprofit Association
    • [email_address]
    • Website: www.MNAonline.org
    • Blog: http://MNAonline.wordpress.com
    • Twitter: @MNAonline
    • Facebook: www.facebook.com/MNAonline
    • LinkedIn: search for Michigan Nonprofit Association
  • 4. Goals for Today
    • Discuss social media plans
    • Explore how to use social media applications (RSS, Facebook, and Twitter specifically) to further your cause
  • 5. What’s Different Today? Source: Slide 10 from “What’s Next in Media?” by Neil Perkin
  • 6.  
  • 7. Flickr: Hamed Saber Your supporters are the message
  • 8.  
  • 9. http://hwyt.me/aBBEz9
  • 10.  
  • 11. You Need a Road Map…
  • 12. Creating a Strategy Map
    • A social media strategy map helps your organization think through objectives, audience, strategy, tools, and measurement to support your organization’s communications and Internet strategy.
  • 13. How do we integrate our social strategy with our communications plan?
  • 14. Source: Inside Obama’s Social Media Tool Kit
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20.
    • What are the top 6 social media fears?
  • 21.
    • Loss of control over your organization's branding and marketing messages
    • Dealing with negative comments
    • Addressing personality versus organizational voice
    • Fear of failure
    • Perception of wasted of time and resources
    • Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more
    Look at each one and brainstorm how you might turn it around...
  • 22.  
  • 23. http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2008/10/how-much-time-d.html
  • 24.  
  • 25. Social Media!
  • 26.  
  • 27.
    • What’s Effective?
    • It depends on your audience
    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • LinkedIn
    • Flickr
    • You Tube
    • Blogs
    Great Resource: Beth’s Blog: http://beth.typepad.com/
  • 28. Beth Kanter’s 8 Principles for Using Social Media Flickr photo by CyboRoZ
  • 29.
    • Listen
    • Engage
    • Relationships with influencers
    • Make it easy to remix and distribute
    • Staff time and expertise
    • The right metrics
    • Small pilots and reiterate
    • Assess organizational culture
    Flickr photo by Melolou
  • 30. What does it mean to listen? Flickr photo by Fe llya
  • 31. Google Alerts
  • 32. Google Alerts www.alerts.google.com
  • 33. What does it mean to engage? Flickr photo by timoni
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36. August 20, 2009 Email from C.S. Mott Foundation http://bit.ly/CaaBO
  • 37. http://hwyt.me/FoundationMedia
  • 38.  
  • 39. www.commoncraft.com/rss_plain_english
  • 40.  
  • 41.  
  • 42. www.netvibes.com/andywolber
  • 43.  
  • 44. http://hwyt.me/95DXa8
  • 45. Flickr photo: laiklosse Let’s Talk Facebook
  • 46. http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • 47.  
  • 48. Facebook
    • What’s Your Goal? What do you want to share here?
    • Experiment and try, try again
      • Tagging a person
      • Adding photos
      • Suggesting to friends
      • Promoting other channels
  • 49. Facebook (con’t)
    • Frequency goal – what works for you?
      • What do you have time for?
      • What kind of new content can you regularly generate?
      • Consider the day and time of the week (or night/weekend)
    • Track how you promote your Facebook page
      • Do you see any changes in insights?
  • 50.  
  • 51. Measuring Results (from Beth Kanter)
  • 52. Facebook Demographics
  • 53. Facebook (cont’d)
  • 54. Facebook (cont’d)
    • Significant spike in domain searches for 2009
    • Algeria, Ethiopia, and Uruguay all experienced the largest increases.
    • Demographically, there were increases in older users, the 35-45 age group, and the 45-54 age group.
    Source: Ignite Social Media: http://www.ignitesocialmedia.com/2009-social-network-analysis-report/
  • 55. http://exchange.causes.com/resources/nonprofits/
  • 56. www.johnhaydon.com
  • 57. http://hwyt.me/9EYvm6
  • 58. http://hwyt.me/DiosaNP
  • 59. Flickr photo by Shovelling Son What’s up with Twitter?
  • 60.  
  • 61.  
  • 62. Twitter
    • What’s Your Goal? What do you want to share here?
    • Twitter’s own personality
    • Experiment and try, try again
      • Sharing photos
      • Linking to other resources
      • Acknowledging donors/volunteers
      • Promote upcoming events/recruit
  • 63. Figure Out What You Tweet
    • Beth Kanter’s Tweet Types:
    • Retweets of others
    • Share Links w/Brief Comment
    • Live Tweeting
    • Closing the Triangle:  ( This is a network weaving technique of introducing people in your network.)
    • Crowdsourcing Questions:  (I use this when I'm developing training materials, particularly for case studies or sometimes for demos of Twitter as a crowdsourcing tools.   Usually I ask a question, and try to get people to answer in another place like a google document or wiki .)
    • Bytes of Wisdom or humor:  (I share some geek humor now and then.  I also share some meta reflections or wisdom about what works or doesn't work in using social media for nonprofits.)  
  • 64.  
  • 65. Twitter Demographics
  • 66. Twitter (cont’d)
  • 67. Twitter (cont’d)
    • Searches for Twitter continue to rise sharply.
    • Increases in Twitter searches are occurring across the board from the US, to Europe, to Asia, to Africa, and the Middle East.
    • Females now search for Twitter more than males.
    • Significant increase in searchers from 0-17 year olds, and thus, those with less than a high school diploma.
    • An increase in searchers in the income brackets of $25,000 to $74,999
    Source: Ignite Social Media: http://www.ignitesocialmedia.com/2009-social-network-analysis-report/
  • 68. www.hootsuite.com
  • 69.  
  • 70. http://posterous.com/help/autopost
  • 71. Redefining a Peer Group
    • The trusted “peer group” is changing to include both “real-life” and online friends, blog writers, reviewers, Twitter followers, etc.
    • Blogs and social media have emerged as key trusted and inspirational sources to discover brands and products
    http://www.marketingcharts.com/interactive/gen-y-women-respond-to-interactive-non-intrusive-campaigns-11337/ Flickr photo: maxymedia
  • 72. Reality Check
    • Most nonprofits are missing the basics. Start there.
    • Basics include:
      • Website
      • Good email marketing
      • Telling good stories
      • Saying thank you
      • Becoming a trusted source for others
    • Then move onto:
      • Facebook
      • Twitter
      • Other social media
    Flickr photo: andrewcoulterenright www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com
  • 73. This is NOT your only website:
  • 74. This is also your website:
  • 75.  
  • 76. Getting Linked In Flickr photo by Matti Mattila
  • 77.  
  • 78. LinkedIn
  • 79. LinkedIn (cont’d)
  • 80. LinkedIn (cont’d)
    • Major increase in searches
    • Much of that increase is due to continued high domain search traffic in the US and India.
    • Younger, less educated, and less wealthy audiences are increasing in their searches for linkedin.com.
    Source: Ignite Social Media: http://www.ignitesocialmedia.com/2009-social-network-analysis-report/
  • 81. What do you do? Flickr photo from DC Central Kitchen
  • 82. Photo Sharing
    • Photos can be uploaded to sites like Flickr, tagged, grouped, and shared
    • Tagging allows photos to be organized by subject matter
    • Groups allow multiple users to upload photos that share a common theme
  • 83. SERVE STRENGTHEN TRANSFORM COMMUNITIES http://www.flickr.com/MNAOnline Photo Sharing
  • 84. Flickr photo from Thomas Hawk
  • 85. Blogs
    • A blog is a contraction of the term “web log,” meaning an online journal or log comprised of multiple entries posted by the user. The entries are generally displayed in reverse chronological order
    • A blog can contain thoughts, ideas, photos, video, audio, links to other web sites, and forums in which discussion can take place through comments
    • A blog can easily act as a hub of an organization’s accounts/presences and facilitate relationship building MNA Blog
    • A blog can also contain a fundraising widget for raising money
  • 86. Nuts About Southwest Blog http://www.blogsouthwest.com/ Video/ YouTube Photos/Flickr Blog Poll News Feed
  • 87. Let My People Go! Flickr photo: zinesklavos
  • 88. Additional Resources
    • Shorten URLs
      • Use www.bit.ly to shorten URLs for your tweets and Facebook updates
    • Facebook Metrics
      • Beth’s Blog www.bethkanter.org
    Flickr photo: nigelmaine
  • 89. Great Book Great Website www.nonprofitmarketingguide.com
  • 90.  
  • 91. http://socialmedia.policytool.net/
  • 92. Another Great Book Order Here: www.MNAonline.org/bookstore.aspx
  • 93. http://hwyt.me/SocMedCalendar
  • 94. SERVE STRENGTHEN TRANSFORM COMMUNITIES http://www.commoncraft.com A Great Resource for Basic Videos:
  • 95. http://highwayt.org/resources
  • 96. Thank You!
  • 97.