Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College  "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Impact of Social Emotional Factors in Our Approach to College "Readiness" - Dr. Adriennie Hatten

564

Published on

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
564
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • My name is Adriennie Y. Hatten. I am in Cohort 19 in the Doctoral Studies Program here at Cleveland State University. This afternoon, I will be presenting on my dissertation study entitled Common Factors that African American Adults Attribute to Their Graduation from a Predominantly African American Midwestern School District: A Case Study.I must say that I have found this study very exciting and informative. While the overall process was challenging I am very pleased with the outcome and to have the opportunity to present my work today.
  • My name is Adriennie Y. Hatten. I am in Cohort 19 in the Doctoral Studies Program here at Cleveland State University. This afternoon, I will be presenting on my dissertation study entitled Common Factors that African American Adults Attribute to Their Graduation from a Predominantly African American Midwestern School District: A Case Study.I must say that I have found this study very exciting and informative. While the overall process was challenging I am very pleased with the outcome and to have the opportunity to present my work today.
  • Read SLIDE then_ by eliciting the African American experience as told by adults who graduated from an American public school. This Study focuses on Education in its broadest sense, spanning from k-12 through lifelong learning opportunities. The role of the neighborhoods in students perspectives of academic success shed light on the importance of understanding the role of neighborhoods in social services provision. THIS IS READINESS TODAY, IN CONTEXT OF ACADEMICALLY PREPARED OR NOT ACADEMICALLY PREPARED
  • B. It is the belief of this researcher that eliciting stories from African American adults such as those who successfully graduated from a Midwestern suburban high school in a district where for over 30 years, the overwhelming majority of the students were African American. Will provide information that can improve academic success for African American students of all ages, thereby reversing the original paradigm
  • The community at-large appears to have provided support in both tangible and intangible ways, from the provision of valuable resources to supporting education activities, to providing motivation for students to participate in school and community activities and leadership, to just coming out as a physical presence of support.their expectations for high school graduation were set at home, first and then reinforced by caring adults at school, in community and that they came in to contact with through other exposure opportunities.NOW: most participants suggested that they do not believe that students in the same community today receive the same level of support which they believe is a part of the challenge that is leading those students to struggle to succeed academically.
  • While several mentioned the support an additional motivation they received from others, many felt certain that they entered high school guided by their own level of motivation, and feeling that success was inevitable. Several even stated that they never considered failing to graduate from hs as an option for themselves.Several other participants noted that they were compelled to succeed in high school because they were motivated by the goals they hoped to obtain for themselves “after high school.” Several participants also reflected on the fact that “they always knew they were going to go to college.” When they spoke about college, there was always a sentiment that college meant “going away”. Individuals indicated that they saw their high school experience as serving a role in preparing them to leave the community and /or city. However, while adults in this study narrated the expectation for success was set at home as was the expectation that their schools were there to help them, Their focus was always on their life after high school. several participants noted that the latter expectation sometimes was challenged. Various reasons for feeling disconnected but often connected to a challenging relationship with a teacher.For two participants in particular, they were compelled to succeed by teacher indifference. The Last comment was from an athlete who felt the teachers did not expect him to be smart because he was an athlete. Joel Spring found some indication from school administrators who worked in schools with high AA or other minority populaqtions, that teachers sometimes possess personal values that lead to disconnects for students.
  • Healthy competition from peer groups as a motivation for graduation from high school was another interesting theme that arose in this analysis. This important social network motivated students to succeed, in most cases in a variety of ways. Peer networks also appear to be fostered by neighborhood connections. The reflections of the participants suggest that friendships that existed in high school continued throughout their lives. It is also noted that several of these friendships began prior to high school and were based on where people lived. Engagement in extra-curricular activities was commonly referred to as a form of motivation and support for the participants during their high school years. Another role that participation in extracurricular activities played was that it gave students the opportunity to discover and build upon their natural talents. One participant reported that she discovered her talent for singing in an English class when the teacher “stood up and applauded when I finished my report.” The participant noted that from that point on she sang in whatever projects and classes she could because she “thought she must be pretty good at it.” This individual also noted that she was very shy and had a limited social presence until she decided to use her singing in theater, which also brought much recognition to the school and was very well supported by the community. Students saw grades as important and a must before you did anything else
  • The Literature also suggests that there are several factors other than just standards, assessment, and teacher professional development that impact the successful education of African-American students in America.Ogbu, Wiggan, 2007, p.317 Teacher Beliefs. Bernstein (1971), Bourdieu and Passeron (1977), and Coleman in 1966.- provide perceptions of negative home environments of AA that they believe do not value education in practice or principalD. Culturally relevant teachers utilize students’ culture as a ‘vehicle’ for learning. E. Participation rates of AA’s in higher education also appears to influence the quantity and quality of research on AA student success
  • Several Themes Arose out of the narratives that reflect commonalities in the experiences shared by the participants and responds to the theoretical frameworks identified in the literature review. Again broader than prepared or not.
  • The findings suggest that a “need to feel successful” and to “successfully comprehend the materials” was important to participants. Other commonaliites included THE SLIDE. “Taking what you are given and actually being able to use that once you are out of school in order to contribute to society and hold your own. I think that is academic success.” The way we define the problem will impact the solutions we create. How are we measuring true academic preparation in the current reality. Is it truly student ability?While some individuals mentioned the value of getting good grades, many felt that the school was a part of meeting longer term goals they and their families had for them- after high school.Participants often reflected on the need for knowledge to be useful and on the value of experiential learning experiences in high school. Reflections on exchange opportunities, opportunities to participate in civic activities, participation in the traditional 12th Grade Shakespeare Festival, chess clubs, literacy clubs, and Junior Achievement, were given as samples of useful and fun learning opportunities they undertook while in high school
  • Transcript

    • 1. THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL EMOTIONAL FACTORS in OUR APPROACH TO COLLEGE „READINESS‟Adriennie Y. Hatten, Ph.D6/11/12
    • 2. THE STUDY• Common Factors that African American Adults Attribute to Their Graduation from a Predominantly African American Midwestern School District: A Case Study
    • 3. Purpose of this study• The purpose of this study is to understand the African American students perception of factors that contributed to their high school graduation based on personal experience
    • 4. Statement of the Problem• The problem is that the African American voice is missing from the dialog on how to improve the African American students experiences in American public schools.• Need to include this voice in setting strategies to impact and define college readiness.• Ready or Not- is interesting paradigm
    • 5. DATA COLLECTION Online Request Volunteer Contact Narrative Interviews
    • 6. DATA ANALYSIS 3-WayNarrative Analysis AxialInquiries of Data Coding
    • 7. FINDINGS
    • 8. Common Success FactorsFull Community Support Positive Caring Adults “The businessmen supported our sports “my friend‟s parents” programs….” “I mean every little thing, even speech meets” “They challenged us” “They gave back to the school;” “Graduation was always the expectation”
    • 9. Influences on ChoicesInternal Motivation Negative Adults “was never an option they considered”. “liked boys better”. …feeling “proud” about her accomplishment “I was put on punishment at home, all year and ability to stick to her personal goal. (because of him)” “after high school.” “I had to show those teachers that I could”.
    • 10. Personal Growth and Development Extra CurricularPeer Relationships Activities “The fact that I paid the money and I took “we formed a little youth group in the school the extra time to take this course with one of because we wanted a good environment to my other friends and ended up successful pray in school.” made me feel great.” “And we had friends who just said „ok you are not “thought she must be pretty good at it.” doing well in that so let‟s figure out why.‟” “We motivated each other to do our best.” “then you did everything else.”
    • 11. Using Literature and Research toAddress HECC Focus• We need to • Several factors Understand other that contribute to factors that greater contribute to a academic deficit based success INCLUDE: approach to – Socialization African American – Student student success perceptions of such as: the environment As well as the – Negative role of Perceptions of cultural values – Culturally Relevant – J. Ogbu‟s Curriculum and Student Teachers Oppositional Identity theory & – Participation Rates – Teacher Beliefs • Influence on Results • Influence on Research
    • 12. Several Other Themes Arose• Evidence of Internal Motivation• Importance of School Pride• Post Secondary options vary(college, war/military, career)• Limited Support for Post Secondary Success• Connection with the Outside World• Commonalities in the Definition of Academic Success
    • 13. Definitions ofAcademic SuccessAccording to the participants

    ×