Academic honesty
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  • 1. + Academic writing An introduction for international students Karen Marie Øvern – September 13, 2013
  • 2. + On the agenda today  Academic honesty vs dishonesty  Writing your term paper/ essay  What does it mean to have access to ”everything”?  IMRAD-structure vs. Essay structure  Guidelines  Referencing  EndNote  Vancouver and Harvard systems for bibliographies
  • 3. + Academic honesty  Three principles:  When you said you did the work yourself, you actually did it.  When you rely on someone else’s work, you cite it.  When you present research materials as data, documents etc, you present them fairly and truthfully. (Lipton 2004, p.3)
  • 4. + Academic DIShonesty  Common cases:  Incorrect/non-exsistent citation  Data corruption (wilful or as accident)  Copying papers with or without permission  Using copyrighted material without proper authorization  Reasons:  Competition and pressure  Conviction  Ambitions  Difficult to detect
  • 5. + Avoiding academic DIShonesty  Follow the guidelines (for the school)  Cite what you use  Be open about your data and analysis  Plan your papers well  Remember the three principles..
  • 6. + Having access to ”everything”  From remembering to understanding  Databases  ACM Digital library  ISI Web of science  ScienceDirect  SpringerLink  Google Scholar  Images  Creative commons  Colourbox
  • 7. + Writing your paper/essay  Articles and reports:  IMRAD structure (Introduction, Method, Results and Discussion)  Essays:  Not the same requirement for structure, but..  Group your arguments  Find an interesting angle  Build your argument, one point at the time  Both:  Correct referencing and bibliography  The three principles of academic honesty..
  • 8. + Referencing  Direct quotation  Indirect quotation  Harvard style  Author-date  Ex. ”80 percent of students find academic writing difficult” (Lastname 2013, p. 3).  Vancouver style  Numbered  Ex. ”80 percent of students find academic writing difficult” (1).
  • 9. + Examples in-text  Vancouver:  Connor says "due to the international aspect, the definition of evidence-based knowledge has changed over time"(1), and this is concurred by several others (2-5). Connor can therefore lean on the public opinion when she claims that it is hard to come by one, unified and good definition (1).  Harvard:  Connor says "due to the international aspect, the definition of evidence-based knowledge has changed over time”(Connor 2007, p. 7), and this is concurred by several others (Martin 2006; Smith 2009; Oppenhouse 2011). Connor can therefore lean on the public opinion when she claims that it is hard to come by one, unified and good definition (2007).
  • 10. + Example reference list  Vancouver:  1. Connor E. Evidence-based librarianship: case studies and active learning excercises. Oxford: Chandos publishing; 2007.  Harvard:  Connor, E. (2007) Evidence-based librarianship: case studies and active learning excercises. Oxford: Chandos publishing
  • 11. + Bibliography  Lipton, C. (2004) Doing honest work in college. Chicago: University of Chicago  Suggested reading:  Guntlett, D. (1998) Essay-writing: the essential guide. [online]. Study Skills Institute of Communication Studies. URL: http://www.theory.org.uk/david/essaywriting.pdf (05.09.2013).