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    Connectivism Connectivism Presentation Transcript

    • Connectivism Learning Theory EDIT 451: Survey of Instructional Media and Technology / Dr. Pearl Chen Wednesday, November 3, 2010 Nora Mossessian Renee Rodriquez Teresa Wu
    • Connectivism The idea that knowledge exists everywhere and is accessed and organized by the learner
    • Contributing Theories Behaviorism "Philosophy and values associated with the measurement and study of human behavior" (Reiser & Dempsey 11).   Cognitivism "Learning is viewed as a process of inputs, managed in short term memory, and coded for long-term recall" (Siemens 3).   Constructivism Vygotsky -2 important Elements: Language & Scaffolding   Constructionism Papert - Learning occurs through learners' engaging in creative experimentation and activity (Kop & Hill 6).  
    • Connectivism A newly developed theory of learning that started within the blogosphere in 2005 and from there has been, and continues to be, developed into a learning theory for the digital age
    • "Learning is a process that occurs within nebulous environments of shifting core elements – not entirely under the control of the individual" (Siemens 5).
    • Principles of Connectivism
        • Diversity of Options
        • Connecting nodes or information sources
        • Reside in non-human appliances
        • Capacity to know more
        • Nurturing & maintaining connections
        • Ability to see connections
        • Currency is the intent
        • Decision-making is a learning process
    • Application of Connectivism - Online Learning Asynchronous - students can access the online material at any time.   Synchronous - Real time interaction between students and instructor.  
    • Benefits of Online Learning
        • Individualized instruction and material designed based on learner's needs and current level of expertise
        • Promote deep, meaningful and contextual learning with constant support in the process
        • Instruction can incorporate strategies and theories from all three different schools of learning (Behaviorist, Cognitivist, and Constructionist)
    • Commonalities in Application of the Different Schools of Learning in Online Learning
        • Use of technology to highlight important information and facilitate maximum sensation.
        • Provide opportunities for learners to process, reflect and make the lesson relate to the learners
        • Learners are intrinsically motivated with extrinsic motivational support.
    • Commonalities (con't)
        • Material are inclusive of different learning styles
        • Simulation of real-life situations.
        • Learners are given opportunities to construct their own knowledge through collaborative and cooperative learning.  
        • Learning process are interactive and promote higher level learning and social presence, and helps develop personal meaning. 
    • Connectivism in the Classroom
        • Google Learning Suite - Docs, iGoogle, RSS, Scholar, etc.
        • Social Bookmarking - Delicious
        • PageCast - Pageflakes
        • Interactives - VoiceThread, Glogster, podcasting, wiki,
        • Study Tools - Quizlets, NoodleBib, Lingt
    • ~ Critics Of Connectivism ~
        • Previous learning theories are sufficient; technology is merely an addition
      •  
        • Not a theory of instruction or learning, but a theory on curriculum/content
      •  
        • Really just a branch of constructivism with the addition of technology
    • ~ Defending Connectivism ~
        • Previous learning theories were developed in a pre-digital era and are outdated
      •  
        • Network formation *is* learning; both content and context matter; new research taking place
      •  
        • It can complement constructivism; ability to co-exist with others
      •  
        • Many theories across disciplines support fostering connections
    • ~ Useful Websites & Resources ~ *Connectivism: Networked and Social Learning   George Siemens' WordPress on various connectivist and digital learning topics http://www.connectivism.ca   *elearnspace George Siemens' main e-learning website, also contains a blog and several articles on the theory and related ideas. http://www.elearnspace.org   *Stephen's Web Stephen Downes' website, also full of resources on connectivism and related topics http://www.downes.ca   *Connectivism & Connective Knowledge Official website of the large online open course taught by Siemens/Downes in 2008 and 2009 on connectivism. Contains course recordings, transcripts, blogs, and wikis. http://ltc.umanitoba.ca/connectivism
    • ~ Discussion + Q&A ~ ~Any questions or comments about this topic? What do you think of this theory? ~How do theories of learning, theories of instruction, and epistemological constructs (aka: definitions of knowledge) work together? ~What type of learning research can better support this theory?
    • ~ Bibliography ~ Ally, M. (2004). Foundations of educational theory for online learning [Chapter 1]. Retrieved from http://cde.athabascau.ca/online_book/ch1.html   Hamilton, B. (2009). Transforming information literacy for nowgen students. Knowledge Quest , 37 (5), 48-53.    Kop, R., & Hill, A. (2008). Connectivism: Learning theory of the future or vestige of the  past?. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning , 9 (3), Retrieved from http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/523/1103   Reiser, R., & Dempsey, J. (2007). Trends and issues in instructional design and technology. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill Prentice Hall. Siemens, G. (2004). Connectivism: A learning theory for the digital age . Retrieved from http://www.elearnspace.org/articles/connectivism.htm   Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism: Learning as network-creation . Retrieved from http://www.astd.org/LC/2005/1105_seimens.htm      
    • ~ Bibliography ~ (continued) Siemens, G. (2006). Connectivism: Learning theory or pastime for the self amused? Retrieved from http://www.elearnspace.org/articles/connectivism.htm   Verhagen, P. (2006). Connectivism: A new learning theory?. Retrieved from http://www.surfspace.nl/nl/Redactieomgeving/Publicaties/Documents/Connectivism%20a%20new%20theory.pdf20theory.pdf