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Betty Sutton for OHIO. Betty Sutton for OHIO. Document Transcript

  •                                      
  •                     BETTY SUTTON for OHIO BUILDING A BETTER OHIOAllison Green ★ Aviv Halpern ★ Evan Currie ★ John Stefos ★ Miriam Diemer ★ Vitali Shkliarou    
  • TABLE of CONTENTSExecutive Summary 4Political Environment 6Strategic Assumptions 9Candidate Research 13Opposition Research 17Polling 32Campaign Structure 37Messaging 43Targeting 53Field 69Communications 81Finance 95Budget 108Scheduling 112Appendix 117   3   View slide
  • Executive Summary 1C ongresswoman   Betty   Sutton   (D   -­‐   Ohio)   is   running   for   reelection   to   the   U.S.     House  of  Representatives  in  2012.    As  a  result  of  the  2010  Census  Ohio’s  con-­‐gressional   districts   were   reapportioned.     Congresswoman   Sutton   currently   serves   the  13th   Congressional   District   of   Ohio,   but   in   2012   she   will   be   running   in   the   new   16th  Congressional  District  against  incumbent  Congressman  Jim  Renacci  (R  -­‐  Ohio).      Though  the  new  16th  Congressional  District  includes  pieces  of  both  the  old  13th  and  old  16th,  the  district  lines  exclude  Congresswoman  Sutton’s  base  in  Akron,  Summit  County,  and  Lorain  County.    The  new  16th  Congressional  District  maintains  all  of  Congressman  Renacci’s   supporters   in   Wayne   County   and   Medina   County.     It   also   maintains  Wadsworth,  where  Congressman  Renacci  was  Mayor  prior  to  serving  in  Congress.  The  race  is  considered  a  toss-­‐up  by  The  Cook  Political  Report.    The  voting  history,  geo-­‐graphic  lines,  and  economic  indicators  of  Ohio’s  16th  Congressional  District  signify  that  Betty  will  need  to  outrun  expected  Democratic  performance.        The  goal  of  this  plan  is  to  outline  the  path  to  victory  for  Betty  Sutton.    Our  targeting  indi-­‐cates  an  expected  election  turnout  of  352,402  voters.    Our  vote  goal  is  183,249  voters,  and   we   expect   a   persuasion   universe   of   87,936   voters.     The   major   geographic   GOTV   tar-­‐get   will   be   Cuyahoga   County   and   our   major   geographic   persuasion   target   is   Medina  County.    We  will  work  to  introduce  Betty  to  voters  in  Portage  County  and  will  mitigate     4   View slide
  • loss   as   much   as   possible   in   Wayne   and   Stark   Counties,   which   are   areas   of   strong   Repub-­‐lican  support.      Our  message  for  voters  is  that  Betty  has  a  record  of  voting  to  “Build  a  Better  Ohio.”  We  will  emphasize  her  votes  that  promoted  job  growth,  worked  towards  economic  stability,  and   provided   for   those   in   need.     We   will   contrast   that   record   to   that   of   Jim   Renacci   who  supports  the  “Ryan-­‐Renacci  budget  plan,”  which  will  cost  American  jobs  and  leave  elder-­‐ly  Americans  without  sufficient  healthcare.      We  will  use  coalitions  of  supporters  in  Unions  and  Women’s  organizations  to  assist  with  fundraising   and   field   efforts.     The   campaign   will   purchase   online,   television   and   radio  media  and  send  multiple  direct  mail  pieces  with  the  aim  of  reaching  targeted  base  and  undecided  voters.    Specific  micro-­‐targets  will  be  determined  as  the  campaign  progresses  after  polling  and  ID  calls.      This  plan  will  also  outline  the  organization  of  the  Sutton  campaign,  the  current  political  environment,   research   on   both   Betty   Sutton   and   Jim   Renacci,   the   targeting   universe,  communication  strategies,  and  the  campaign  calendar.     5  
  • Political Environment 2O hio  will  once  again  be  a  battleground  state  in  the  2012  presidential  election.     In   2000,   George   W.    Bush   carried   the   state   by   only   3   percentage   points   and   by  only  2  points  in  his  2004  reelection  campaign.      In  2008,  Barack  Obama  won  the  state  by  4  points  over  John  McCain.      Ohio  is  clearly  a  swing  state  that  is  typically  won  by  just  a  few  percentage  points,  and  the  result  in  the  2012  presidential  race  will  be  similar.      Be-­‐cause  of  this,  both  the  Romney  and  Obama  campaigns  will  be  very  active  in  Ohio,  a  factor  which  will  greatly  affect  down  ballot  races.  Betty  Sutton’s  record  makes  it  difficult  for  her  to  run  away  from  President  Obama,  and  her  opponents  will  gladly  try  to  tie  her  to  his  record.      In  some  parts  of  the  district,  Betty  can  run  closer  to  the  President,  but   the  overall  message  will  have  to  center  on  what  she  has   done   for   Ohio.     However,   as   of   the   writing   of   this   plan   (May   2012),   the   Real   Clear  Politics   polling   average   has   Obama   at   47   percent,   up   by   4.6   points   over   Romney.     Im-­‐proving  popularity  of  the  President  will  be  a  benefit  for  Sutton.    However,  given  Ohio’s  history,  we  can  expect  that  President  Obama  will  continue  to  poll  very  close  to  Romney  statewide  over  the  coming  months.        Romney’s  choice  for  his  Vice  Presidential  nominee  could  also  have  an  impact  on  the  Sut-­‐ton   race.       Republican   Ohio   Senator   Rob   Portman   has   been   mentioned   as   a   potential  running  mate  for  Romney.      In  a  May  2012  Public  Policy  Polling  survey,  Portman’s  ap-­‐proval  was  low  with  31  percent  approving  and  33  percent  disapproving.      A  full  36  per-­‐cent  surveyed  had  no  opinion  on  his  job  performance  which  means  that  there  are  poten-­‐   6  
  • tial   voters  to  win  over.     The   same   poll  tested  how  it  would  affect  the  Republican  ticket   if  Portman   were   selected,   and   found   that   he   helped   narrow   Romney’s   gap   in   Ohio.       If  Portman  is  selected  for  the  ticket,  we  should  expect  that  this  will  pull  media  and  voter  attention  away  from  our  race  to  the  presidential  race.      It  could  also  end  up  driving  Re-­‐publican   turnout  in  the  state,  which  could  end  up  creating  more  down  ballot  votes  for  Republican   candidates.       The   Sutton   campaign   needs   to   be   prepared   to   address   these  potential  effects  if  Portman  is  selected.  Democratic  incumbent  Sherrod  Brown’s  Senate  race  will  also  impact  down  ballot  races.      Brown  is  being  challenged  by  State  Treasurer  Josh  Mandel,  who  is  less  well  known  and  is  trailing  in  recent  public  polling.      However,  Brown’s  approval  rating  has  hovered  in  the  low   40s,   a   sign   that   his   reelection   could   be   tough   race.       With   Republicans   looking   for  every  opportunity  to  take  control  of  the  Senate,  Brown  will  be  a  target.  On   the   positive   side,   the   Obama   and   Brown   campaigns   will   be   registering   voters   and  driving   turnout,   which   will   benefit   down   ticket   races   like   the   16th   Congressional   Dis-­‐trict.     But   those   campaigns   will   also   be   a   drain   on   resources   for   the   Sutton   campaign.        As   higher   profile   races,   the   Obama   and   Brown   campaigns   will   pull   resources   such   as  volunteers  and  support  from  affiliated  groups  like  labor  unions.    The  cost  of  media  re-­‐sources  will  be  affected  by  the  increased  demand  for  advertising  slots  caused  by  up  tick-­‐et  races.      Within  state  government,  Republican  Governor  John  Kasich’s  approval  rating  is  around  44  percent  as  of  March  2012,  and  has  been  rising  from  lows  in  the  30s.    Low  approval  ratings   are   largely   the   result   of   the   Scott   Walker/Wisconsin-­‐style   policies   his   admin-­‐istration  has  pursued.      The  most  well  known  of  these  policies  was  an  effort  to  restrict  collective  bargaining  by  public  sector  unions,  which  was  overwhelmingly  defeated  with     7  
  • more  than  60  percent  voting  “no”  on  the  ballot  issue  in  2011.      Betty  Sutton’s  record  with  labor   and   the   massive   organization   effort   undertaken   by   Ohio   labor   organizations   to  defeat  the  ballot  measure  will  be  important  assets  in  her  reelection  campaign.  The   political   environment   within   the   16th   Congressional   District   is   very   similar   to   the  environment   of   the   entire   state.    Ohio   lost   two   seats   after   reapportionment   in   2010,   and  the   Republican-­‐controlled   state   legislature   collapsed   two   Democratic-­‐held   seats   when  they   drew   the   new   districts.     As   a   result,   two   Democratic   Ohio   Representatives   ran  against  each  other  in  a  primary,  and  incumbent  Betty  Sutton  is  now  facing  fellow  incum-­‐bent,  Republican  Jim  Renacci.    Like  the  state  as  a  whole,  many  of  northeast  Ohio’s  con-­‐gressional  districts  are  swing  seats  that  regularly  switch  between  both  parties.      Howev-­‐er,   during   redistricting,   the   new   16th   district   appears   to   have   been   drawn   to   lean   Re-­‐publican.    Many  of  the  major  cities  that  were  in  Betty’s  former  13th  district  have  been  cut  out,  leaving  a  more  suburban  district.      As  a  result,  Betty  Sutton  will  face  a  tough  and  likely  very  close  race  to  defeat  Renacci.  Though   it   will   be   a   close   race,   there   is   still   a   clear   roadmap   to   victory   for   the   Sutton  Campaign.    The  following  strategic  assumptions  set  the  framework  for  the  campaign  and  help  to  establish  the  context  for  the  race.               8  
  • Strategic Assumptions 3O hio  will  be  a  battleground  state  for  the  Presidential  Election.    Because  of  this,   we   know   that   media   time   will   be   expensive   and   difficult   to   get.     We   know   this  will  drive  turn-­‐out  and  we  can  expect  votes  cast  to  be  closer  in  number  to  2008  rather  than   2010.     We   also   assume   that   both   Parties   will   likely   begin   organizing   coordinated  campaigning  in  Ohio.         o Based  on  recent  polls  in  OH,  we  know  that  Obama  is  running  a  close  race  to  Rom-­‐ ney.     Obama   has   a   slight   lead.     We   expect   this   trend   to   continue   and   to   benefit   Betty  Sutton  as  she  uses  Obama’s  popularity  to  her  advantage.         We   expect   the   Senate   race   in   Ohio   to   be   very   competitive.     We   will   expect   to   coordi-­‐ nate  with  Senator  Brown  during  the  campaign;  we  also  expect  that  this  race  and  the   Presidential  race  will  affect  our  campaign  by  way  of  driving  turn  out.     o We  recognize  there  could  be  some  negative  effects  of  the  Senate  race  on  our  cam-­‐ paign  as  well,  including  fewer  volunteers  in  some  areas  as  they  may  be  dedicated   to  one  of  the  other  Democratic  campaigns.     o In  spite  of  the  other  campaigns  operating  in  the  same  area,  donations  to  the  Betty   Sutton  campaign  have,  so  far,  been  in  excess  of  what  was  raised  in  either  2010  or     9  
  • 2008.    Because  of  the  importance  of  this  house  race  for  both  Democrats  and  Re-­‐ publicans,  we  expect  this  trend  to  continue.         Rob   Portman   is   on   the   short   list   for   Vice   President.     This   could   affect   the   election   by   increasing  turnout  for  the  Republican  Candidate.         We  assume  that  our  opponent  will  attempt  to  demonize  us  by  tying  us  to  a  “failed   administration”,  an  “economy  in  shambles”,  and  a  health  care  plan  that  will  “bank-­‐ rupt”  the  nation  and  strip  money  from  Medicare.     We   know   that   the   district   was   apportioned   to   be   a   Republican   leaning   district.     Though   party   registration   isn’t   required   for   primary   voting   in   Ohio,   this   lean   can   be   studied   through   historical   voter   performance   numbers.     Based   on   voter   histories   and  the  redistricting  lines,  we  assume  that  if  we  turn  out  only  “Democratic”  voters,   we  will  lose  this  election.     We  know  that  the  new  district  contains  large  portions  of  Renacci’s  old  congressional   district  including  all  of  Wayne  county  as  well  as  the  town  of  Wadsworth  in  Medina   county  where  he  was  Mayor.         Wayne  county  had  a  DPI  of  ~40%  in  2008,  and  ~30%  in  2010.    We  expect,  due  to   Renacci’s  ties  to  the  county,  that  we  can  expect  a  DPI  closer  to  2010.    Because  of  this,   we  will  not  spend  a  large  portion  of  time  or  resources  on  this  county.         10  
  •   Portage   county   has   never   voted   for   Sutton   or   Renacci.     Both   name   IDs   will   be   low   in   this   area.     It   will   be   more   important   here   than   anywhere   that   we   define   ourselves   before  Renacci  has  a  chance  to  define  us.         Medina   county   will   be   our   second   largest   voting   block   of   expected   voters   within   the   district.    Medina  is  also  the  only  county  that  has  voted  for  both  Sutton  and  Renacci   (Sutton  in  the  North,  Renacci  in  the  South).    We  believe  this  will  be  our  best  oppor-­‐ tunity   to   compare   ourselves   to   Renacci.     We   will   target   this   county   for   persuasion   votes.         Though  CD16  does  include  portions  of  Cuyahoga  county,  it  does  not  include  any  part   of   the   city   of   Cleveland.     We   adjusted   DPI   to   reflect   performance   in   the   precincts   in-­‐ cluded  in  CD16.    We  expect  to  find  voters  who  commute  into  the  city  for  work,  but   live  in  the  suburbs.    This  will  include  moms,  families,  people  with  slightly  larger  in-­‐ comes,  and  less  racial  diversity  than  the  county  numbers  as  a  whole.    We  still  expect,   based   on   these   numbers,   that   this   will   be   our   largest   “base”   vote,   our   most   progres-­‐ sive   voters,   and   the   most   important   area   to   coordinate   our   campaign   with   the   Party   and  with  the  President.         Job,   Healthcare,   and   the   Economy   will   be   major   themes   in   both   our   campaign   and   Recacci’s.           11  
  •  We  expect  that  the  unemployment  rate  will  hover  around  the  current  7.5%  for  Ohio   through  the  remainder  of  the  campaign.         We   can   assume   that   there   will   be   large   amounts   of   outside   spending   in   this   race,   on   both  sides.  We  expect  that  both  candidates  in  this  race  will  spend  about  $3  million  in  their  campaigns  for  this  seat.   12  
  • Candidate Research 4Betty  Sutton  Bio/Background   B orn   and   raised   in   Barberton,   Sum-­‐ mit  County,  Ohio   Birth  Date  July  31,  1963   The  youngest  of  six  children     Her  mother  was  a  clerk  for  the  local  library   and   her   father,   a   veteran   of   World   War   II,   worked  at  the  local  boilermaker  factory.       Attended  public  schools  in  Barberton   Graduated  from  Kent  State  University  in  1985  having  majored  in  Political  Science   Received  her  J.D.    from  University  of  Akron  in  1990   Worked   as   a   labor   lawyer   and   held   a   private   practice   before   she   moved   into   her   po-­‐ litical  career  at  Attorney,  Faulkner,  Muskovitz  and  Phillips,  LLP   Married  to  Doug  Corwon   Religion:  Methodist         13  
  • Political  Experience    Barberton  Ohio  City  Council  1991-­‐1992    Member  of  the  Ohio  House  of  Representatives  1993-­‐2001    Member  of  the  House  of  Representatives  (2006-­‐present)  Congressional  Committees    Member,  House  Armed  Services  Committee    Member,  House  Natural  Resources  Committee    Member,  Congressional  Task  Force  on  Seniors    Vice-­‐Chair,  Congressional  Automotive  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Career  and  Technical  Education  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Labor  and  Working  Families  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Task  Force  on  Competitiveness    Co-­‐Chair,  Congressional  Task  Force  on  Job  Creation    Member,  Friends  of  Job  Corps  Congressional  Caucus  **For  full  list  of  Caucuses  and  Committees  please  refer  to  Appendix  A    Awards    Distinguished  Service  Award,  Ohio  Automobile  Dealers  Association  (2010)    Automotive  News  All-­‐Star  (2010)    Fighting  Freshman  Award  from  the  U.S.    Business  and  Industry  Council    Legislator  of  the  Year  Award,  Ohio  American  Veterans  Association  (2009)    Graded  A+  from  The  Iraq  and  Afghanistan  Veterans  of  America  (2008)    100%  Score  by  the  Alliance  for  Retired  Americans    Champion  of  Health  Care  Innovation  Award,  Health  Care  Leadership  Council      Defender  Award,  National  Association  of  Community  Health  Centers  (2009)     14  
  •  Elected  President  of  the  Freshman  Class  of  Democrats  (2006)  **For  full  list  of  AWARDs  please  refer  to  Appendix  B    Election  Endorsements  **For  full  list  of  Election  Endorsements  please  refer  to  Appendix  C    Organizations    Member,  Akron  Child  Guidance  Advisory  Council    Member,  American  Bar  Association    Member,  Associates  of  Trial  Lawyers  of  America    Member,  Barberton  Democratic  Party    Member,  Barberton  Womens  Democratic  Party    Member,  Federated  Democratic  Women    Member,  Ohio  Academy  of  Trial  Lawyers    Member,  Summit  County  Democratic  Party    Member,  Summit  County  Trial  Lawyers  Association    Strengths    Has  a  record  of  voting  against  the  Democratic  party  if  it  will  benefit  Ohio  (H.R.     9,  other  bills  protecting  the  Auto  industry)    Introduced   Cash   for   Clunkers   which   was   very   popular   with   Ohioans   and   spiked  auto  sales  in  the  area    Sponsored   a   bill   that   would   require   public   works   to   use   materials   made   in   America,  which  would  give  a  boost  to  the  Ohio  steel  industry  and  other  manu-­‐ facturing  plants  in  the  area.     15  
  •  Voted  in  support  of  the  NLRB  so  it  could  keep  its  authority  and  power  to  re-­‐ strict  or  hinder  businesses  from  outsourcing  their  manufacturing  thus  keep-­‐ ing  jobs  in  Ohio    Did   not   support   the   Ryan   Plan   which   would   have   several   terrible   effects   on   Ohio’s  seniors  and  budget    Supported  the  payroll  tax  cut    Extended  unemployment  benefits  and  fought  to  keep  foreclosure  prevention   and  relief  programs    Vulnerability    Rep.     Sutton   has   one   of   the   lowest   staff   retention   rates   in   the   House   of   Repre-­‐ sentatives  at  19.2%,  which  can  be  used  to  portray  Rep.    Sutton’s  personality   or  paint  the  image  that  there  is  something  wrong  with  the  way  she  runs  her   office.       (http://www.rollcall.com/issues/57_91/Study-­‐Tracks-­‐Staff-­‐Turnover-­‐on-­‐Hill-­‐ 212156-­‐1.html)      Ohio   passed   Issue   3,   which   is   a   proposal   that   prevents   Ohioans   from   being   forced   to   participate   in   the   health   care   system.     This   poses   an   issue   for   the   campaign  because  it  shows  that  Ohioans  don’t  necessarily  want  the  Afforda-­‐ ble   Care   Act,   which   Sutton   supported.     However,   Issue   3   was   an   Ohio-­‐wide   proposal  and  does  not  necessarily  reflect  the  views  of  the  constituents  of  the   16th  district.       (http://www.cleveland.com/politics/index.ssf/2011/11/early_results_in_on_ohio _issue.html)     16  
  • Opposition Research 5Jim  Renacci  Bio/Background   B orn   on   Dec.    3,  1958  in  Monongahe-­‐ la,  Pennsylvania,  a  suburb  of  Pittsburgh   Father  was  a  railroad  worker  and  his  moth-­‐ er  was  a  nurse   Earned  a  Degree  in  Business  Administration   from  Indiana  University  of  Pennsylvania  and   became  a  Certified  Public  Accountant  (CPA)   and  financial  advisor   In   2003,   Renacci   formed   the   LTC   Companies   group,   a   financial   consulting   service   which   included   a   partial   ownership   of   three   Harley-­‐Davidson  dealerships  in  Columbus,  the  Lifestyle  Communities  Pavilion  in  Co-­‐ lumbus,  and  Renacci-­‐Doraty  Chevrolet  in  Wadsworth   Renacci  became  a  partner  and  managing  board  member  of  the  former  Arena  Foot-­‐ ball  League’s  Columbus  Destroyers   Renacci  has  a  wife,  Tina  and  three  kids:  Drew,  Ryan,  Rhiannon   Renacci  also  worked  as  a  volunteer  firefighter       17  
  • Political  Experience    Freshman  Congressman,  elected  in  2010    1993-­‐1994  Wadsworth  Board  of  Zoning  Appeals    1999  President  of  Wadsworth’s  City  Council    2004  Mayor  of  Wadsworth    Congressional  Committees    United  States  House  Committee  on  Financial  Services    Vice-­‐Chair   on   the   Subcommittee   on   Financial   Institutions   and   Consumer   Credit    Subcommittee  on  Oversight  and  Investigations    Republican  Study  Committee    Republican  Main  Street  Partnership    Election  Endorsements  **For  full  list  of  Election  Endorsements  please  refer  to  Appendix  D    Organizations    Sharon  Golf  Club  in  Medina  County  (all-­‐male)    National  Board  of  Accountants           18  
  • Strengths    Has  received  several  big  Republican  endorsements    Has  voted  to  lower  corporate  tax    Voted   against   “Obamacare”  which  Ohio  as  a  whole  was  not  supportive  of.    Ev-­‐ idence   can   be   found   in   the   ballot   Issue   3   which   passed   in   Ohio   stating   that   Ohio  would  eliminate  the  mandatory  aspect  of  the  law.    Was  a  small  business  owner  for  27  years  and  created  jobs  in  Ohio  (self-­‐made   millionaire)    Extended  the  payroll  tax  cut    Vulnerability    Voted   in   Favor   of   the   Ryan   Plan   (the   Republican   Budget   on   Medicare).     Ac-­‐ cording  to  the  Congressional  Committee  on  Energy  and  Commerce,  the  Ryan   Plan  will  affect  OH16  in  the  following  ways:   o Increase  prescription  drug  costs  for  9,000  Medicare  beneficiaries  in  the   district   who   enter   the   Part  D  donut  hole,  forcing  them  to  pay  an  extra   $88   million  for  drugs  over  the  next  decade.       o Eliminate   new   preventive   care   benefits   for   111,000   Medicare   benefi-­‐ ciaries  in  the  district.       o Deny  470,000  individuals  age  54  and  younger   in  the  district  access  to   Medicare’s  guaranteed  benefits.       o Increase   the   out-­‐of-­‐pocket   costs   of   health   coverage   by   over   $6,000   per   year  in  2022  and  by  almost  $12,000  per  year  in  2032  for  the  110,000   individuals  in  the  district  who  are  between  the  ages  of  44  and  54.       o Require   the   110,000   individuals   in   the   district   between   the   ages   of   44   and   54  to  save  an  additional  $25.7  billion   for  their  retirement  –  an  average  of   $182,000  to  $287,000  per  individual  –  to  pay  for  the  increased  cost  of     19  
  • health   coverage   over   their   lifetimes.     Younger   residents   of   the   district   will   have  to  save  even  higher  amounts  to  cover  their  additional  medical  costs.        Raise  the  Medicare  eligibility  age  by  at  least  one  year  to  age  66  or   more  for  59,000  individuals   in  the  district  who  are  age  44  to  49   and  by  two  years  to  age  67  for  363,000  individuals  in  the  district   who  are  age  43  or  younger.      Renacci   accepted   large   campaign   contributions   from   a   Northern   Ohio   busi-­‐ nessman   whose   employees   are   currently   under   federal   investigation.     More   than   $200,000   in   campaign   contributions   from   the   employees   at   the   Suarez   Corporation   were   given   to   Renacci   and   U.S.     Senate   candidate   Josh   Mandel.     Many  of  the  employees  and  their  spouses  that  have  never  given  contributions   before  and  lived  in  modest  homes  with  job  titles  such  as  “copywriter”  donated   $5,000  to  one  or  both  campaigns.       (http://hotlineoncall.nationaljournal.com/archives/2012/05/report-­‐fbi-­‐prob.php,       CantonRep:  http://www.cantonrep.com/news/x358789616/FBI-­‐probes-­‐Suarez-­‐ employees-­‐campaign-­‐contributions       Associated  Press:   http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5jpiLILeA58tBUftO39NGL QTKeE4w?docId=acd6bcec512348bfb2834e6966047307)      In   February   2011,   Renacci   said   that   he   would   support   cutting   the   defense   budget.    He  said  “Those  in  the  military  have  to  be  accountable  like  every  other   department.   (http://www.the-­‐daily-­‐record.com/local%20news/2011/02/07/renacci-­‐s-­‐ business-­‐experience-­‐guides-­‐decisions)      Voted  for  Cuts  to  Local  Child  Support  Enforcement  Agency.    A  spokeswoman   for   Renacci   said   that   while   he   appreciates   the   program   and   the   support   it   provides,   he   must   support   legislation   that   provides   an   offset   to   guarantee   the     20  
  • bill  will  not  spend  more  taxpayer  money.    The  spokeswoman  said  Renacci  will   keep  an  eye  on  the  bill  “will  act  accordingly”     (http://www.the-­‐daily-­‐record.com/local%20news/2011/03/05/csea-­‐braces-­‐for-­‐ fallout-­‐from-­‐loss-­‐of-­‐federal-­‐funds)      In  March  2011,  the  Center  for  Responsive  Politics  published  a  study  of  the  fi-­‐ nances  of  several  congressional  freshman  and  it  was  determined  that  Renacci   was  the  6th  richest  freshman  with  $28.4  million  in  possible  net  worth.    This   helps  spread  the  image  that  he  is  out  of  touch  with  the  everyday  Ohioan     (Washington  Post:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-­‐ dyn/content/article/2011/03/09/AR2011030902631.html)      Renacci  has  stated  that  one  thing  he  learned  was  that  he  must  constantly  be  in   campaign  mode.    He  said  “Guess  what  happens  after  you  get  elected?  You’ve   got   to   start   running   again.”  This  helps  paint  the  image  that  he  is  a  career  poli-­‐ tician.       (Canton  Republic:  http://www.cantonrep.com/stark/x337039533/Jackson-­‐ students-­‐get-­‐answers-­‐from-­‐Renacci)      Rep.     Renacci   has   received   36%   of   his   Campaign   Cash   from   industries   that   he   regulates  in  the  first  quarter  of  2011.    In  April  2011,  the  Sunlight  Foundation   reported   Renacci   received   36%   of   his   political   donations   from   the   banking,   insurance,   and   real   estate   industries.     He   regulates   those   same   industries   in   his  role  as  a  legislator  on  the  House  Financial  Services  Committee.    This  vul-­‐ nerability  greatly  helps  with  the  image  of  Renacci  as  an  out  of  touch  Washing-­‐ ton  insider.       (http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2011/06/jim_renacci_gets_help_fro m_vis.html)      Renacci  is  a  member  of  an  All-­‐Male  Golf  Club  called  the  Sharon  Golf  Club     (http://www.cleveland.com/open/index.ssf/2011/06/ohio_democrats_criticize_r ep_j.html)     21  
  • On the Issues 5a   Betty  Sutton  on  Jobs    B etty   Sutton   has   repeatedly   supported   legislation   aimed   at   keeping   jobs   in   America  rather  than  allowing  them  to  be  outsourced  overseas.    She  has  stat-­‐ed,   “I   know   that   in   these   tough   times,   my   most   important   job   is   getting   Ohio   back   to  work…it   is  time  to  put  working  Americans  first  to  ensure  Northeast  Ohio’s  small  busi-­‐nesses,  job  seekers,  and  manufacturers  get  a  fair  shake.”  Rep.    Sutton  has  voted  in  favor  of   increasing   regulations   on   Wall   Street   to   prevent   another   bailout,   and   voted   against  free   trade   agreements   with   other   countries   such   as   Korea,   Colombia,   and   Panama   that  threaten   Ohio   jobs.     Rep.     Sutton   has   also   sponsored   legislation   focusing   on   “buying  American”  and  requiring  the  use  of  American  made  materials  in  construction.    Further-­‐more,  Representative  Sutton  voted  against  a  bill  that  would  eliminate  the  ability  of  the  National   Labor   Relations   Board   (NLRB)   to   restrict   outsourcing   or   change   the   location   of  manufacturing   plants.     Representative   Sutton’s   position   appeals   to   the   many   labor   un-­‐ions,  and  manufacturing  workers  in  Ohio.  Voting  Record    Sponsored  H.R.    1684  the  Keep  American  Jobs  from  Going  Down  the  Drain  Act   which  would  require  the  use  of  American  iron,  steel,  and  manufactured  goods   in  construction  and  repair  of  public  infrastructure.     22  
  •  Voted  against  H.R.    3078,  H.R.    3079,  H.R.    3080  which  are  trade  agreements   with  Panama  and  Colombia,  and  a  free  trade  agreement  with  Korea.    Voted  against  H.R.    3094  the  Workforce,  Democracy  and  Fairness  Act    which   would  limit  the  authority  of  the  NLRB  to  facilitate  the  unionization  of  work-­‐ ers,  restricting  the  number  and  composition  of  collective  bargaining  units    Voted   against   H.R.     2587   which   would   deny   the   NLRB   the   ability   to   restrict   outsourcing  or  change  in  location  in  business  and  production    Voted  against  the  Democratic  Party  in  order  to  support  H.R.    9  which  would   provide  tax  cuts  to  Businesses  with  500  employees  or  less.    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    4851  the  Unemployment  Benefits  Extension     Jim  Renacci  on  Jobs  Representative  Renacci  is  an  avid  businessman.    He  has  voted  primarily  with  the  Repub-­‐lican   Party   as   can   be   seen   through   his   voting   record   supporting   small   businesses   and  supporting   secret   ballots   for   unions.     In   supporting   small   businesses,   Representative  Renacci  stated  that  his  goal  is  to  keep  America  competitive.    Rep.    Renacci  firmly  believes  that  “we  cannot  tax,  spend  or  regulate  ourselves  into  prosperity,”  (Renacci’s  Campaign  Website).      Voting  Record    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3835  which  extends  the  pay  freeze  for  Congress  and   Non-­‐military  federal  workers    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3094  the  Workforce,  Democracy  and  Fairness  Act     23  
  •  Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    2587  the  Protecting  Jobs  from  Government  Interfer-­‐ ence  Act,  which  denies  the  NLRB  the  authority  or  power  to  restrict  a  business   from  outsourcing  or  changing  location    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    9  which  provides  tax  cuts  for  businesses  with  fewer   than  500  employees    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3079,  H.R.    3078  and  H.R.    3080  which  are  two  free   trade  promotions  and  one  free  trade  agreement  with  Panama,  Colombia  and   Korea  respectively.     Betty  Sutton  on  Health  Care  Rep.   Sutton   has   made   health   concerns   one   of   her   top   priorities.     She   has   promised   to  improve  access  to  quality  and  affordable  care,  curb  skyrocketing  health  care  costs,  and  end  the  discriminatory  practices  of  the  insurance  industry.    With  her  support,  the  gov-­‐ernment  passed  the  Patient  Protection  and  Affordable  Care  Act  which  provides  stability  for   Americans   who   currently   do   not   have   insurance,   expands   access   to   affordable   insur-­‐ance  for  those  who  do  not  currently  have  insurance,  and,  ultimately,  reigns  in  the  cost  of  health  care  for  Ohio  families.  Furthermore,   Rep.     Sutton   voted   in   favor   of   SCHIP   the   State   Children’s   Health   Insurance  Program   which   would   provide   cost-­‐effective   health   coverage   for   millions   of   children  whose  parents  cannot  provide  their  own  insurance.    In  addition,  during  her  time  in  Con-­‐gress,  Rep.    Sutton  sponsored  and  passed  the  Josh  Miller  HEARTS  Act  to  ensure  that  eve-­‐ry  elementary  and  secondary  school  across  the  country  can  obtain  an  automated  exter-­‐nal  defibrillator  which  is  the  most  effective  treatment  for  someone  who  is  experiencing     24  
  • cardiac  arrest.    This  action  earned  her  the  2010  Sudden  Cardiac  Arrest  Coalition’s  Legis-­‐lative  Award.  Regarding   Medicare   and   Medicaid,   Rep.     Sutton   has   consistently   supported   seniors   in  Ohio.    She  voted  against  H.R.    2576  which  would  require  the  inclusion  of  Social  Security  benefits  in  the  calculation  of  modified  adjusted  gross  income  and  significantly  hurt  sen-­‐iors  attempting  to  utilize  the  benefits  that  they  have  earned.    Furthermore,  she  is  public-­‐ly  against  the  Ryan  plan  because  its  negative  effects  to  seniors  in  Ohio  are  too  great.  Voting  Record    Voted  against  H.R.    2576  which  requires  the  inclusion  of  Social  Security  bene-­‐ fits  in  calculation  of  modified  adjusted  gross  income    Voted  against  H.R.    358  which  amends  patient  protection  and  Affordable  Care   Act  to  prohibit  abortion  coverage    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    847  in  2010,  the  9/11  Health  and  Compensation  Act      Voted  in  2007  for  H.R.4  the  Medicare  Prescription  Drug  Price  Negotiation  Act      Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    6331  the  Medicare  Bill  and  also  voted  in  favor  of  over-­‐ riding  the  subsequent  veto.                     25  
  • Jim  Renacci  on  Health  Care  Representative  Renacci  believes  that  America  must  take  measures  to  reduce  costs  and  make  access  to  health  insurance  more  affordable  for  everyone,  yet  he  believes  that  the  2010   health   care   reform   law   failed   to   address   the   fundamental   causes   of   high   health  care  costs.    Representative  Renacci  is  in  favor  of  repealing  the  Affordable  Care  Act  and  believes   that   the   key   to   making   health   care   more   affordable   is   increasing   competition.    In  order  to  increase  competition,  Rep.    Renacci  supports  a  plan  that  allows  purchasing  health  care  across  state  lines.    Furthermore,  Rep.    Renacci  believes  that  legislating  tort  reform   would   help   stop   defensive   medicine   in   which   doctors   prescribe   unnecessary  tests.  On  the  issue  of  Social  Security  and  Medicare,  Rep.    Renacci  believes  that  the  path  to  pro-­‐tecting  benefits  for  seniors  is  aligned  with  reducing  spending  because  such  a  path  would  support   seniors   without   additional   taxes.     Renacci   also   supports   the   Ryan   Plan   which  has  several  negative  effects  on  seniors.  Voting  Record    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    2576  which  requires  inclusion  of  Social  Security  bene-­‐ fits  in  the  calculation  of  modified  adjusted  gross  income  which  would  have  a   negative  effect  on  seniors    Voted  in  favor  if  H.R.    1214  which  would  repeal  funding  for  school-­‐based   health  center  construction    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    1213  which  would  repeal  funding  for  state  health  bene-­‐ fit  exchanges    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    2  which  would  repeal  the  health  care  bill     26  
  • Betty  Sutton  on  Economy  and  Budget  Representative   Sutton   voted   for   the   bailout   of   General   Motors   and   Chrysler.     She   also  supported  the  TARP  stimulus  package  in  an  effort  to  simulate  the  economy.    She  voted  to  modify   bankruptcy   rules   to   reduce   mortgage   foreclosures   and   against   terminating   the  Home  Affordable  Modification  Program.    In  addition,  she  voted  for  the  Credit  Card  Hold-­‐er’s   Bill   of   Rights   and   supported   a   usury   limit   on   credit   card   interest   and   protections  against   hidden   fees.     Furthermore   Representative   Sutton   voted   against   a   Balanced  Budget  Amendment  to  the  Constitution.      Voting  Record    Voted  against  H.J.    Res  2  which  proposes  a  balanced  budget  amendment  to  the   U.S.    Constitution    Voted  against  H.R.    4348  which  would  provide  an  extension  of  Surface  Trans-­‐ portation  funding  and  approval  of  the  Keystone  XL  Pipeline    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3835  extending  the  pay  freeze  for  Congress  and  non-­‐ military  federal  workers    Voted  against  H.R.    1217  which  would  repeal  the  prevention  and  public  health   fund    Voted  against  H.R.    861  which  would  terminate  the  neighborhood  stabiliza-­‐ tion  program    Voted  against  H.R.    836  which  would  terminate  the  Emergency  Mortgage  Re-­‐ lief  program           27  
  • Jim  Renacci  on  Economy  and  Budget  Representative  Renacci  believes  that  Americans  do  not  need  higher  taxes.    Rep.    Renacci  stated   that   his   goals   are   to   simplify   the   system   by   reducing   taxes,   broadening   the   tax  base,  permanently  repealing  the  estate  tax,  reducing  the  corporate  tax,  and  repealing  the  President’s  health  care  bill.  Voting  Record    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    4348  which  would  extend  the  Surface  Transportation   funding  and  approve  of  the  Keystone  XL  Pipeline    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3630  which  reduces  payroll  taxes  and  unemployment   benefits    Voted  in  favor  of  H.    J.    Res.    2    which  proposes  a  balanced  budget  amendment   to  the  U.S.    Constitution    Voted  in  favor  of  S.    627  on  increasing  the  Debt  Ceiling  (Boehner  Bill)     Betty  Sutton  on  Energy  and  Oil  Representative  Sutton  has  a  history  that  reflects  a  belief  in  green  energy  and  a  focus  on  the  reduction  of  greenhouse  gases.    Rep.    Sutton  has  consistently  voted  in  favor  of  sup-­‐porting  renewable  energy  and  providing  incentives  for  energy  production  and  conserva-­‐tion.    Despite  this  belief  however,  Rep.    Sutton  has  supported  the  President  in  legislation  that  would  require  oil  companies  to  drill  on  land  they  have  already  leased  as  many  oil  companies  lease  land  but  do  not  drill  there.    Representative  Sutton  is  not  supportive  of  “fracking”  or  other  oil  collection  methods  that  are  a  danger  to  the  environment  or  that  would  not,  in  her  opinion,  solve  the  problem  they  are  attempting  to  fix,  higher  gas  prices.    Representative  Sutton  does  encourage  reducing  dependence  on  foreign  oil.     28  
  • Furthermore,   Representative   Sutton   has   championed   legislation,   such   as   Cash   for  Clunkers,  or  even  providing  trade-­‐in  vouchers  for  Fuel  Efficient  Cars  in  2009.  Voting  History    Voted  against  H.R.    4348  the  Approval  of  the  Keystone  Pipeline    Supported  H.R.    2751  which  would  provide  trade-­‐in  vouchers  for  Fuel  Effi-­‐ cient  Cars  (in  2009)    Voted  against  H.R.    1230  the  Offshore  Leasing  Act    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.4785  which  would  authorize  loans  for  energy  efficient   purposes    Voted  in  2008  in  favor  of  H.R.    6251  which    is  legislation  to  require  oil  compa-­‐ nies  to  drill  on  land  they  have  already  leased    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3221  the  Renewable  Energy  and  Energy  Conservation   Tax  Act  of  2007  which  would  provide  tax  incentives  for  energy  production   and  conservation       Jim  Renacci  on  Energy  and  Oil  Representative   Jim   Renacci   strongly   opposes   the   “Cap   &   Trade”   energy   tax.     Rep.     Re-­‐nacci   supports   offshore   drilling   and   other   extraction   methods   such   as   “fracking,”   a  method   to   extract   natural   gas   and   gasoline   domestically.     Renacci   supports   initiatives  that  he  believes  will  reduce  oil  prices,  such  as  the  Keystone  pipeline.           29  
  • Voting  Record    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    4348  the  extension  of  Surface  Transportation  funding   and  Approval  of  the  Keystone  XL  Pipeline    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3408  which  authorizes  the  development  of  Oil  Shale   Resources    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    1230  the  Offshore  Leasing  Act    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    910  the  Energy  Tax  Prevention     Betty  Sutton  on  Homeland  Security/Military  Representative  Sutton  has  stated  that  she  is  committed  to  the  security  of  America.    She  has  passed  legislation  to  support  the  Border  Patrol,  security  fencing  and  is  even  a  part  of  the  Law  Enforcement  Caucus  (See  Caucus  List  in  Appendix  A).    Furthermore,  Rep.    Sut-­‐ton  is  in  favor  of  removing  troops  in  Afghanistan  with  an  appropriate  timeline  (H.    Con.    Res  28  was  not  a  realistic  timeline).  Voting  Record    Voted  against  H.    Con.    Res.    28  on  Removing  Troops  from  Afghanistan    Voted  against  H.    Amdt.    16  on  Reducing  Navy  and  Air  Force  Appropriations    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3082  Continuing  Appropriations    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    2965  the  Don’t  Ask,  Don’t  Tell  Repeal  Act    Voted  in  favor  of  H.R.    3159  on  Mandatory  Troop  Rest  Periods  between  De-­‐ ployments  to  Iraq    Co-­‐Sponsored  H.R.    2194  to  toughen  sanctions  on  Iran  and  to  promote  re-­‐ gional  stability  and  ensure  security  for  the  U.S.    and  its  allies       30  
  • Jim  Renacci  on  Homeland  Security/Military  Rep.  Renacci  believes  that  Washington  needs  to  rely  heavily  on  the  advice  of  the  Gener-­‐als   on   the   ground   in   Afghanistan.     He   has   also   committed   to   ensuring   that   the   troops  have   the   equipment   and   support   that   they   need.     Furthermore,   Renacci   believes   that  Washington   must   stay   on   the   offense   in   the   “Global   War   on   Terror.”   Rep.     Renacci  strongly  opposes  the  transfer  of  current  terrorist  detainees  to  the  United  States  as  well  as  access  to  the  United  States  judicial  system.    He  believes  that  Guantanamo  Bay  is  the  only   prison   that   can   safely   detain   individuals   who   pose   a   high-­‐level   security   risk,   and  that  they  must  be  kept  there  until  there  is  another  viable  off-­‐shore  alternative.  Voting  Record    Voted  against  H.    Amdt.    16  on  reducing  Navy  and  Air  Force  appropriations    Voted  against  H.    Con  Res  28  regarding  removing  troops  from  Afghanistan    Voted  against  H.    Con  Res  51  on  removing  armed  forces  from  Libya    Voted  in  favor  of  H.    Res.    292  in  favor  of  keeping  Ground  Forces  in  Libya                   31  
  • Polling                 6    Benchmark  W e  plan  to  send  out  an  initial  Benchmark  poll  at  the  beginning  of  May.    In  this   poll  we  will  ask  questions  to  gauge  interest  in  this  race,  general  sentiment  towards   the   President,   views   about   the   economy,   feelings   about   the   direction   of   the  country,  and  initial  preference  in  the  Presidential  race  between  Barack  Obama  and  Mitt  Romney.      The  Benchmark  poll  will  also  stand  as  our  early  indication  of  basic  name  ID  for  both  Bet-­‐ty  Sutton  and  Jim  Renacci  in  the  new  seat.    On  its  own,  the  benchmark  poll  will  provide  a  good  marker  of  the  work  ahead  for  the  Sutton  Campaign  in  terms  of  basic  introduction  to  the  new  district.  We  will  also  use  this  time  to  test  messages.    As  shown  on  our  message  wheel,  we  want  to  direct  the  campaign  message  toward  “building  jobs”,  “supporting  Ohio  workers’,  “a  bal-­‐anced   approach   to   debt   reduction”,   and   “quality,   affordable   access   to   health   care   for  Ohio.”   In   the   benchmark   poll,   we   will   test   the   saliency   of   these   issues   as   well   as   some  specific  approaches  to  delivering  these  messages.  Sutton   has   several   potential   weak   points   and   we   expect   to   be   hit   by   charges   of   “reckless  spending”,  being  “an  Obama  lackey”,  and  favoring  “big  government.”  In  the  benchmark  poll,  we  will  also  test  the  saliency  of  these  weaknesses  so  that  we  can  fully  understand  our  own  vulnerabilities.         32  
  • The  Benchmark  will  serve  as  a  tool  to  figure  out  our  messaging  strategy  for  hitting  Re-­‐nacci  on  what  we  perceive  are  his  weaknesses.    We  will  ask  voters  if  they  think  he  is  “out  of   touch”   with   Ohioans,   if   they   believe   he   is   “too   tied   to   wall   street”   to   represent   their  interests,  and  if  they  think  his  support  of  the  Ryan  budget  plan  is  too  harsh  for  Ameri-­‐cans   and   Ohioans.     In   addition,   we   will   test   statements   that   he   is   likely   to   use   as   his   own  message;  that  his  is  a  business  owner,  that  he  creates  jobs,  and  that  cutting  taxes  is  the  right  way  to  balance  the  budget.      Our   messages   indicate   that   we   expect   the   economy,   jobs,   the   federal   budget,   and   the  Ryan  plan  to  be  the  most  important  issues  to  voters.    We  will  also  test  this  assumption  to  make  sure  the  campaign  is  headed  down  the  correct  path  with  messaging.         Sample  Questions  for  the  Benchmark  Poll   To  be  administered  in  May,  2012   Prefer  300-­‐400  respondents,  from  the  new  CD  16     Demographics    Are  you  male  or  female?    What  is  your  age?    Are  you  registered  to  vote?   o If  yes,  are  you  registered  for  a  particular  party?   o Democrat  or  Republican  or  Other      What  issues  are  most  important  to  you  in  the  upcoming  election?    Do  you  feel  like  the  economy  is  on  the  right  track,  or  do  you  feel  as  though  it  is   going  in  the  wrong  direction?     33  
  •  Do  you  plan  on  voting  in  the  upcoming  2012  election?   o If  yes:   o Have  you  made  a  decision  on  who  you’ll  be  voting  for  in  the  presidential  election?   If  yes,  who?  (Give  Both  Options)   o Will  you  also  vote  for  the  House  race?   o Do  you  know  yet  who  you’ll  vote  for?   If  yes,  who?  (Give  Both  Options)   o If  no:   o Why  won’t  you  be  voting  in  the  election?  (Open  Ended)        Do  you  know  who  Betty  Sutton  is?   o If  yes:   o How  do  you  feel  about  Betty  Sutton?  (Open  Ended)   o Do  you  think  Betty  Sutton  is  a  strong  leader?  (Yes  or  No  -­‐  Take  Comments)   o Do   you   think   Betty   Sutton   has   what   it   takes   to   help   turn   the   economy   around?   (Yes  or  No  -­‐  Take  Comments)   o Do  you  agree  with  Betty  Sutton’s  vote  to  support  Obamacare?   o Do  you  think  that  Betty  Sutton  has  been  working  to  create  jobs  for  Ohioans?   o Do  you  think  that  Betty  Sutton  spends  government  money  recklessly?   o Do  you  like  that  Betty  Sutton  supports  the  “Buying  American  Made”  movement?   o Do   you   believe   that   Betty   Sutton   works   harder   for   the   Democratic   Party   or   for   Ohioans  regardless  of  party  affiliation?      Do  you  know  who  Jim  Renacci  is?   o If  yes:     34  
  • o How  do  you  feel  about  Jim  Renacci?  (Open  Ended)   o Do  you  think  Jim  Renacci  is  a  strong  leader?  (Yes  or  No  -­‐  Take  Comments)   o Do  you  think  Jim  Renacci  has  what  it  takes  to  help  turn  the  economy  around?  (Yes   or  No  -­‐  Take  Comments)   o Do   you   think   that   Jim   Renacci’s   ties   to   Wall   Street   firms   make   him   a   more   or   less   effective  Representative?   o Do  you  agree  with  Jim  Renacci’s  support  of  the  Ryan  Budget?   o Do  you  support  Jim  Renacci’s  desire  to  eliminate  Obamacare?   o Do   you   agree   with   Jim   Renacci   that   the   best   path   to   a   balanced   budget   is   through   spending  cuts?   o Do  you  think  Jim  Renacci  works  harder  for  Ohioans  or  for  other  special  interests?      Demographic  Questions    How  old  are  you?  (Record  response  on  range)    What  is  the  last  grade  you  completed  in  school?  (Record  response  on  range)    Are  you  currently  employed?  (Employed,  Part-­‐time,  Looking,  Not  Looking,  Re-­‐ tired,  NA)    Do  you  have  children?  (Yes  or  No)    What  is  your  household  income?  (Give  Range)    Are  you,  or  is  someone  in  your  family  a  member  of  a  union?    Do  you  collect  Social  Security  Benefits?    Do  you  receive  Medicare  Benefits?         35  
  • Brushfire  /Tracking  Polls  We   have   budgeted   for   various   brushfire/tracking   polls   throughout   the   course   of   the  campaign.    These  polls  will  become  more  frequent  as  the  campaign  nears  Election  Day.    Brushfire  polls  will  inform  various  tactical  decisions  regarding  media  purchases  and  the  GOTV  effort.  As  a  precaution  against  the  possibility  of  an  unexpected  negative  attack,  we  will  main-­‐tain  enough  money  in  the  budget  for  two  extra  brushfire  polls  in  the  last  months  of  the  campaign.     We   may   not   need   to   use   all   this   money.     Additional   monies   not   used   for   poll-­‐ing  will  be  returned  to  the  general  fund  for  media  buys  or  the  GOTV  effort.      Brushfire/tracking  polls  will  be  used  to  gauge  the  effectiveness  of  our  message  and  our  ID   numbers   throughout   the   course   of   the   campaign.     Because   the   16th   Ohio   congres-­‐sional  district  is  a  new  district,  we  will  plan  to  have  at  least  one  brushfire/tracking  poll  a  month  to  make  sure  we  are  reaching  the  voters  we  intend  to  reach.        Brushfire  /Tracking  Poll:  Questions  to  Consider    ID  for  Betty  Sutton    ID  for  Jim  Renacci    To  be  tracked  for  both  Candidates  On  a  scale  of  1  -­‐  5,  with  1  being  “strongly  agree”  and  5  being  “strongly  disagree:”    Candidate  is  working  to  create  jobs  for  Ohioans.    Candidate  is  a  strong  leader.    Candidate  has  a  plan  to  improve  the  economy.    Candidate  shares  my  values.    Candidate  believes  in  reasonable  solutions  above  extreme  partisanship.           36  
  • Campaign Structure           7             37  
  • Betty  Sutton  Paid  Staff    Campaign  Manager  -­‐  $12,000/month  T his  position  will  be  the  second  hire  of  the  campaign,  after  Finance  Director.     The  Campaign  Manager  will  be  directly  responsible  for  the  senior  staff,  and  directly   accountable   to   the   Candidate.     The   Campaign   Manager   will   be   responsible   for  approving   field   plans,   media   buys,   and   press   releases   when   needed.     The   Campaign  Manager   will   also   have   final   say   over   fundraising   events,   FEC   reports   and   the   candi-­‐date’s  schedule,  but  in  practice  these  things  will  likely  be  done  without  approval  by  the  Campaign   Manager   at   each   step.     The   Campaign   Manager   will   hold   a   staff   meeting   at   the  beginning   of   each   week   and   will   be   responsible   for   the   agenda.     The   Campaign   Manager  will  also  be  the  direct  contact  for  outside  consultants  and  supportive  organizations.    The  Campaign  Manager  will  also  initially  act  as  political  director.    Over  time,  this  designation  may  transfer  to  the  field  director.  Communications  Director  -­‐  $4,500/month  The   communications   director   will   be   an   early   hire,   though   later   than   both   fundraiser  and  Campaign  Manager.    It  will  be  necessary  to  keep  the  press  alerted  to  events  and  re-­‐spond  to  press  requests,  but  early  in  the  campaign,  we  plan  to  have  the  duties  covered  by   other   staffers   until   the   position   becomes   busy   enough   for   a   full   time   staffer.     The  communications  director  will  report  directly  to  the  Campaign  Manager.    The  communi-­‐cations  director  will  work  closely  with  the  researcher  to  fact  check  everything  prior  to  any   type   of   public   release   of   information.     The   communications   director   will   be   a   key  piece  in  the  earned  media  plan,  and  will  work  with  field  staff  in  this  regard.           38  
  • Finance  Director/Fundraiser  -­‐  $9,000/month  The  finance  director/fundraiser  will  be  the  first  hire  of  the  campaign.    The  finance  direc-­‐tor  will  be  responsible  for  planning  events  as  well  as  keeping  the  campaign’s  books.    The  finance  director  will  also  be  responsible  for  compiling  and  filling  FEC  reports  in  consul-­‐tation  with  the  campaign’s  hired  legal  consultant.    The  finance  director  will  be  directly  responsible   for   gathering   a   fundraising   committee   for   the   campaign.     Once   in   place,   it  will   be   the   finance   director’s   responsibility   to   manage   this   committee,   oversee   its   ac-­‐tions,   and   assist   members   in   their   endeavors.     The   finance   director   will   report   to   the  Campaign   Manager,   but   in   practice,   this   will   be   an   independent   position   that   will   also  report  directly  to  the  Candidate.    The  finance  director  will  hire  a  finance  assistant  to  help  with  verifying  names,  planning  events  and  compiling  FEC  reports.  Assistant  Finance  Director  -­‐  $3,500/month  The  assistant  finance  director  will  report  directly  to  the  finance  director.    The  assistant  will  be  on  hand  to  help  with  compiling  and  crosschecking  information  to  ensure  compli-­‐ance  with  FEC  contribution  restrictions.    The  assistant  finance  director  will  also  help  the  finance  committee  with  event  planning  when  necessary  and  any  other  tasks  assigned  by  the  finance  director.  Field  Director  -­‐  $3,500/month  The   field   director   will   plan,   organize,   staff,   and   direct   the   field   component   of   the   cam-­‐paign  plan.    This  includes  preparing  phone  banks,  canvasses,  volunteer  recruitment,  out-­‐reach,  vote-­‐by-­‐mail  drives,  voter  registration  drives,  and  the  GOTV  effort.    The  field  di-­‐rector   will   be   responsible   for   knowing   important   voting   deadlines,   legal   specifics   of  vote-­‐by-­‐mail,  and  fully  understanding  the  targeting  universe.         39  
  • The  field  director  will  report  directly  to  the  Campaign  Manager,  but  will  be  involved  and  included   in   discussions   with   pollsters   and   other   hired   staff   to   discuss   targeting   and   best  practices  for  contacting  targeted  voters.     The   field   director   will   be   in   charge   of   two   field  organizers   and   two   offices.     The   field   director   will   be   responsible   for   determining   the  important  community  events  that  require  the  candidate’s  presence.    In  addition,  the  field  director   will   be   responsible   for   managing   the   organizers   and   following   up   with   voter  contact  to  confirm  that  we  are  reaching  our  vote  goals.      Organizers  -­‐  $3,000/month  Two  organizers  will  be  hired  in  July  to  staff  the  campaign’s  two  field  offices  in  Cuyahoga  County   and   Summit   County.     These   organizers   will   be   responsible   for   implementing  phone   banks   and   canvasses   through   volunteer   recruitment.    They   are   also   responsible  for  their  respective  counties,  for  attending  important  community  events,  and  for  staffing  the  Candidate  when  she  attends  these  events.    The  organizer  will  be  responsible  for  all  things   volunteer   related   such   as:   building   an   audience   for   a   rally,   finding   extras   for   a  media   shoot,   and   staffing   the   office   and   entering   data.     The   organizers   will   be   encour-­‐aged  to  create  an  unpaid  intern  program  to  help  them  in  their  efforts.        Researcher  -­‐  $3,000/month  The  campaign  researcher  will  be  responsible  for  updating  the  research  books  when  nec-­‐essary   and   knowing   the   information   contained   in   the   books.     As   part   of   this   duty,   the  researcher   should   be   familiar   with   the   latest   details   from   the   Renacci   campaign.     The  researcher  will  report  directly  to  the  Campaign  Manager,  but  will  work  closely  with  the  communications   director   as   that   position   will   be   responding   to   press   inquiries,   and  questions  regarding  the  candidates  record  and  stance.    The  researcher  can  request  ac-­‐   40  
  • cess  to  the  candidate  to  verify  information  if  the  need  arises,  but  the  first  line  of  ques-­‐tions  will  need  to  go  to  the   Campaign  Manager.     The  researcher  will  be  brought  into  dis-­‐cussions  with  the  mail  consultant  and  media  consultant  as  letters  and  scripts  are  being  approved.      Scheduler  -­‐  $3,000/month  The  scheduler  will  be  directly  responsible  for  handling  requests  from  both  the  outside  and  from  within  the  campaign.    The  scheduler  is  in  charge  of  the  candidate’s  schedule.    It  will  be  important  for  the  scheduler  to  speak  directly  with  the  candidate  at  the  beginning  of  the  campaign  to  determine  scheduling  needs  for  both  her  and  her  family.    Following  that   initial   conversation,   the   scheduler   will   report   directly   to   the   Campaign   Manager.    The  scheduler  will  be  responsible  for  knowing  what  events  have  been  requested,  which  were  accepted  and  which  were  rejected.    The  scheduler  will  need  to  have  intimate  knowledge  of  the  district,  distances  between  venues  and  drive  times  between  different  areas.    In  addition,  they  will  need  to  determine  what  scheduling  requests  can  be  feasibly  satisfied  in  a  given  day,  and  if  an  event  needs  to  be  declined,  it  is  the  scheduler’s  responsibility  to  reach  out  to  campaign  benefactors.    The   scheduler   will   speak   often   with   the   Campaign   Manager   regarding   geographic   and  issue   targets   so   that   they   will   be   better   able   to   prioritize   the   candidate’s   time.     When   an  event  is  planned  by  the  campaign,  the  scheduler  will  be  responsible  for  booking  neces-­‐sary  accommodation  reservations  for  the  candidate  and  any  staff  that  she  may  be  travel-­‐ing  with.               41  
  • Betty  Sutton  Volunteer  Teams    Finance  Committee  The  finance  committee  will  be  directed  by  the  finance  director.    They  will  be  a  group  of  volunteers  charged  with  planning  high  dollar  events  and  raising  large  dollar  donations.      Election  Protection  Team  The   election   protection   team   will   be   a   group   of   two   volunteer   lawyers   in   each   of   our   six  counties  to  be  in  place  on  Election  Day  to  answer  calls  regarding  polling  location  issues  and   any   other   questions   that   arise   in   regards   to   election   laws.     The   lawyers   will   be  trained  by  the  consultant  lawyer  on  retainer.      College  Fellowship  Program  The   fellowship   program   will   be   recruited   and   managed   by   the   organizers   in   each   field  office.      **For  more  information  on  the  College  Fellowship  Program  please  see  the  Field  section    Consultants    Will  be  hired  for  the  following  positions:    Pollster  /  Lawyer  /  Web  Consultant  /  Media  Consultant  /  Mail  Consultant   42  
  • Messaging 8Theme  and  Message  T he campaign  believes  that  jobs,  healthcare,  and  the  economy  will  be  the  three   most  important  issues  facing  the  majority  of  Ohioans  and,  by  extension,  the  three  primary  issues  of  the  campaign  (for  more  information  please  see  the  strategic  as-­‐sumptions  section).    In  developing  the  strategy  and  message  of  the  Sutton  Campaign,  it  is  important  to  address  these  primary  issues  in  a  way  that  best  represents  Betty  Sutton’s  stance,  and  the  message  this  campaign  wishes  voters  to  take  away  from  her  campaign.  The  core  strategy  of  the  campaign  is  to  determine  how  to  win  by  creating  or  exploiting  appropriate  perceptions  within  a  unifying  message  in  order  to  motivate  available  voters  to  vote  for  Sutton  or  against  Renacci.    The  central  message  of  Sutton’s  Campaign  is  that  she   is   “Building   a   Better   Ohio.”   The   campaign   will   emphasize   this   unified   and   concise  message  to  show  that  Rep.      Sutton  will  continue  her  record  of  standing  up  for  the  mid-­‐dle   class,   supporting   Ohio   workers,   supporting   American   industries,   and   ensuring  healthcare   accessibility   to   everyone.     This   message   is   action-­‐oriented   and   works   well  with  the  campaign’s  strategic  emphasis  on  the  economy.  This  campaign  seeks  to  reinforce  the  idea  that  Rep.  Betty  Sutton  is  constantly  working  to  improve  local  Ohio  industries,  businesses,  and  help  the  middle  class,  while  Jim  Renacci  will  be  portrayed  as  supporting  big  businesses  and  Wall  Street  executives.           43  
  • Message  Grid   Sutton  on  Sutton   Sutton  on  Renacci  o Building  a  Better  Ohio   o Out  of  Touch   Creating  manufacturing  jobs  in   Renacci  is  a  multi-­‐millionaire,  doesn’t   Ohio,  pushing  for  Buy  American   pay  his  taxes  on  time,  and  does  not   provisions,  protecting  Ohio  work-­‐ play  by  the  same  rules  as  hardwork-­‐ ers,  protecting  the  middle  class  and   ing  Ohioans,  he  is  even  a  member  of   small  businesses   an  all-­‐male  golf  club  o One  of  Us   o Supports  the  Ryan-­‐Renacci  Plan   Can  foster  an  emotional  connection   would  increase  the  prescription  drug   to  her  personal  story,  she  works   costs  for  9,000  Medicare  beneficiaries   hard,  works  to  balance  the  budget   in  the  district,  would  deny  470,000   in  the  same  way  that  families  do   individuals  age  54  and  younger  in  the  o Votes  to  Protect  Seniors  and  make   district  access  to  Medicare’s  guaran-­‐ Health  Care  affordable  for  everyone   teed  benefits  and  is  in  general  bad  for   Voted  for  the  Affordable  Care  Act   seniors  (See  Jim  Renacci:  Vulnerabili-­‐ and  supported  many  provisions   ties)   protecting  seniors  for  having  to  ad-­‐ o Not  a  Job  Creator   just  for  social  security  benefits  in   Financial  consultant,  can  be  tied  to  a   their  adjusted  gross  income   narrative  around  Romney  and  Bain  o Is  From  Ohio,  and  is  For  Ohio   Capital,  didn’t  hire  anyone  for  over  a   Voted  against  the  Democratic  party   year  in  his  business   in  order  to  better  represent  Ohio’s   o Voted  against  Ohio  Workers   small  businesses     Supported  free  trade  agreements,   voted  in  favor  of  the  Workforce,  De-­‐ mocracy  and  Fairness  Act  which  hurt   Unions  and  allow  companies  to  out-­‐ source  without  answering  to  the   NLRB   Renacci  on  Sutton   Renacci  on  Renacci  o Betty  Sutton  wants  to  grow  govern-­‐ o Would  get  government  off  of  people’s   ment   backs  o Betty  Sutton  is  a  lapdog  for   Cutting  regulation  for  job  creation,   Obama/Reid/Pelosi   cutting  regulation  for  lower  energy   Will  tie  Sutton  to  the  Obama  admin-­‐ costs,  repeal  Obamacare   istration,  will  call  her  too  liberal   o Pro-­‐business  o Voted  for  Obamacare  and  supports  a   Working  to  create  jobs  by  reducing   government  takeover   regulation,  cutting  taxes,  for  small  o Supports  needless  spending  by  voting   business   for  bills  that  are  not  fiscally  responsible   o Fiscally  responsible  o Keeping  oil  and  energy  prices  artificial-­‐ Voted  to  rein  in  spending  and  cut  the   ly  high  because  she  does  not  support   deficit   efforts  to  increase  drilling  and  or  other   methods  that  would  cause  gas  prices  to   drop     44  
  •  Key  Issues    Jobs         **The  number  one  issue  affecting  Ohioans    Health  Care       **Highest  vulnerability  regarding  this  issue    Economy  and  Budget    Energy  and  Oil    Homeland  Security/Military    Strategy  and  Framing  The   campaign   must   frame   each   issue   in   such   a   way   that   it   benefits   the   campaign.     By  framing  the  debate  and  by  focusing  the  campaign  on  issues  we  wish  first,  it  would  ap-­‐pear   that   all   arguments   that   Renacci   may   make   will   simply   be   in   response   and   it   will  appear   that   he   is   struggling.     By   pointing   out   key   votes   that   he   has   taken   and   framing  issues   to   the   public   in   strategic   ways   the   campaign   aims   to   show   Betty   Sutton   as   the  stronger  candidate  and  better  representative.      There   are   several   strategies   that   the   campaign  will  be  employ  in  order  to  put  itself   at   an  advantage  over  the  Renacci  campaign.  Ryan-­‐Renacci   Plan   –   The   campaign   will   highlight   the   negative   effects   of   the   Ryan   Plan  which  Renacci  supported.    By  tying  the  two  names  together,  it  is  a  simple  way  to  link  the  negatives  that  the  Ryan  Plan  would  produce  in  the  district  if  enacted  and  Renacci.    We  are   hoping   to   frame   the   healthcare   debate   by   focusing   on   the   negatives   of   the   Ryan-­‐Renacci  Plan  rather  than  attempting  to  explain  Obamacare  to  voters  who  have  histori-­‐cally  had  difficulty  understanding  it.    Furthermore,  Obamacare  is  not  popular  with  many     45  
  • Ohioans   as   seen   by   their   vote   on   Issue   3,   which   stated   that   any   individual   cannot   be  forced  to  purchase  or  take  part  in  healthcare.  Radio  Advertising  –  We  are  beginning  advertising  on  radio  earlier  than  our  advertising  on  television.    Whereas  the  television  market  is  very  expensive  and  encompasses  more  than  just  the  16th  district,  radio  provides  a  more  inexpensive  way  to  begin  getting  the  campaign  message  out  to  voters,  earlier  on.    Furthermore,  this  allows  us  to  begin  fram-­‐ing   issues   such   as   Jobs   and   Healthcare,   which   we   predict   the   most   voters   will   identify  with  and  have  strong  feelings  about.  **  For  more  information  please  see  the  Paid  Media  section.  District   Visits   –   Another   way   we   are   going   to   get   our   message   out   is   through   traveling  through  the  majority  of  our  district  while  still  focusing  on  our  target  districts.    By  mak-­‐ing   Rep.     Sutton   more   relatable   and   a   more   familiar   face   in   this   new   and   redistricted  16th  district,  it  is  important  that  she  meets  as  many  voters  as  possible  in  order  to  get  the  message  out  further  and  to  give  herself  an  advantage  over  Renacci.    Voters  are  likely  to  remember  meeting  a  Congressional  candidate  and  any  take-­‐away  from  their  conversa-­‐tion  or  her  speech  compared  to  a  piece  of  persuasion  mail.  **For  more  information  please  see  the  Earned  Media  section.  Highlighting  Rep.  Sutton’s  Experiences  –  Rep.  Betty  Sutton  has  been  a  representative  for  many   unions   including   representing   first   responders   and   other   workers.     This   is   a   great  message  to  highlight  to  the  voters  in  the  district  because  there  are  many  prominent  un-­‐ions   in   the   area   and   further,   her   past   representing   labor   groups   such   as   first   responders  is  a  very  difficult  position  to  attack.    By  highlighting  these  facts  it  also  gives  the  campaign  an  advantage  in  convincing  people  in  those  professions.    Other  aspects  of  her  past  can  be     46  
  • highlighted  to  the  campaigns  advantage  as  well.    Through  her  family  history,  not  only  do  the   new   voters   that   were   districted   into   the   16th   district   get   to   know   Rep.   Sutton,   but  she  can  also  appeal  to  veterans  through  her  father’s  military  experience  and  her  voting  record.     Betty   Sutton   has   consistently   voted   to   increase   veterans   benefits   and   for   job  training  causing  her  to  be  named  the  Ohio  American  Veterans  Association  Legislator  of  the  Year  in  2010.  **For  more  information  about  Betty  Sutton  please  see  Candidate  Research  section.  **For  more  targeted  groups  please  see  the  Targeting  section.                           47  
  • Jobs   Sutton  on  Sutton   Sutton  on  Renacci  o “I  know  that  in  these  though  times,  my   o Says  that  he  is  protecting  jobs  but  is  real-­‐ most  important  job  is  getting  Ohio  back   ly  making  it  harder  for  every  day  Ohioans   to  work.”   to  find  work  o Sponsored  bills  focusing  on  buying   o Didn’t  hire  people  for  over  a  year  and  a   American  made  products  which  are  pri-­‐ half  when  he  owned  his  business   marily  made  in  Ohio   o Voted  in  favor  of  the  free  trade  agree-­‐o Voted  against  several  free  trade  agree-­‐ ments  with  Korea,  Panama,  and  Colombia   ments  protecting  jobs  from  outsourcing   and  voted  for  the  Workforce,  Democracy  o Voted  against  the  Democratic  party  in   and  Fairness  Act  which  make  it  harder  to   order  to  support  a  tax  cut  to  small  busi-­‐ make  a  union  and  makes  it  easier  for   nesses  with  less  than  500  employees   businesses  to  move  overseas  o Introduced  the  widely  popular  Cash  for   o Voted  for  a  Corporate  business  tax Clunkers  Program  which  caused  a  boost   in  the  auto  industry   Renacci  on  Sutton   Renacci  on  Renacci  o Kills  jobs  because  she  voted  for  the  Af-­‐ o “We  cannot  tax,  spend  or  regulate  our-­‐ fordable  Care  Act   selves  into  prosperity”  (Campaign  Web-­‐o Sutton’s  support  of  Obamacare  keeps   site)   small  business  from  hiring  because  they   o Voted  to  support  tax  cuts  for  small  busi-­‐ are  so  unsure  how  the  law  will  affect   nesses  in  addition  to  a  corporate  tax  cut   their  business   o Voted  to  make  American  businesses  o The  regulations  that  Sutton  and  the  Ad-­‐ more  competitive  in  overseas  markets ministration  support  make  it  difficult  for   businesses  to  hire.    Strategic  Implications  Betty   Sutton   has   a   strategic   advantage   on   the   issue   of   job   creation.     Some   of   the   votes  that  Jim  Renacci  has  made  leave  him  vulnerable  for  a  strong  attack  on  his  stance  regard-­‐ing   jobs.     While   he   may   cite   the   statistic   that   he   has   created   jobs,   his   votes   paint   the   pic-­‐ture   that   he   was   detrimental   to   some   of   key   Ohioan   industries.     Betty   Sutton   was   the  “key   architect”   of   programs   such   as   Cash   for   Clunkers,   voted   against   her   party   to   sup-­‐port  small  businesses,  and  can  use  these  to  support  the  message  that  she  has  consistent-­‐ly  been  voting  in  favor  of  Ohioans  rather  than  Washington.     48  
  • Health  Care   Sutton  on  Sutton   Sutton  on  Renacci   o Voted  to  provide  health  care  to  millions   o Voted  for  the  Ryan-­‐Renacci  Plan  which   who  were  not  able  to  find  coverage  due   would  effectively  end  Medicare  turning   to  pre-­‐existing  conditions   it  into  just  another  private  insurance   o Voted  for  SCHIP  the  State  Children’s   company  that  can  pick  and  choose  who   Health  Insurance  Program  which   it  covers.   would  provide  cost-­‐effective  health   o Voted  for  H.R.    2576  which  would  re-­‐ coverage  for  millions  of  children  whose   quire  the  inclusion  of  Social  Security   parents  could  not  support  them   benefits  in  the  calculation  of  modified   o Has  a  proven  past  of  supporting  sen-­‐ adjusted  gross  income  and  significantly   iors     hurt  seniors  attempting  to  utilize  the   o Voted  AGAINST  the  Ryan  Plan  and   benefits  that  they  worked  hard  to  earn   against  the  inclusion  of  Social  Security   o His  alternatives  to  the  Affordable  Care   benefits  in  calculation  of  modified  ad-­‐ Act  don’t  work  and  don’t  provide  any   justed  gross  income  which  would  hurt   care  or  any  protection  for  U.S.    citizens seniors   o Supports  women’s  health  initiatives. Renacci  on  Sutton   Renacci  on  Renacci   o Voted  for  Obamacare  which  “gutted   o American  must  take  measures  to  re-­‐ $500  million  from  Medicare”   duce  costs  and  make  access  to  health   o Needlessly  spending  on  a  bill  that   insurance  more  affordable  for  every-­‐ would  not  effectively  provide  health   one  by  increasing  competition   coverage  to  Ohioans. o Ability  to  purchase  health  insurance   across  state  lines   o Has  always  supported  Seniors  and  pro-­‐ tects  Medicare  Strategic  Implications  On  this  particular  issue,  Betty  Sutton  must  come  out  and  set  the  tone  of  the  debate  first  in  order  to  present  the  issue  in  light  of  Medicare  and  the  Ryan  Plan.    If  Sutton  does  not  come  out  and  set  the  debate  first  by  pointing  to  the  negative  effects  of  the  Ryan-­‐Renacci  plan,  she  will  be  seen  as  just  trying  to  point  the  finger  back  at  Renacci  for  his  critique  of  her  vote  on  Obamacare.  On  healthcare,  Renacci  has  an  advantage  as  there  are  not  many  known  statistics  about  the  Ryan-­‐Renacci  Plan,  while  the  Obama  plan  has  been  highly  politicized.    If  Sutton  can  frame  the  issue  she  will  gain  the  advantage  and  momentum  in  this  issue  area.   49  
  • Economy  and  Budget Sutton  on  Sutton   Sutton  on  Renacci  o Voted  to  help  Ohio  homeowners  by   o Voted  to  terminate  the  Home  Afforda-­‐ modifying  the  bankruptcy  rules  to   ble  mortgage  program  without  offering   avoid  mortgage  foreclosures   any  alternative  o Prevented  terminating  the  Home  Af-­‐ o Voted  to  repeal  funding  for  school-­‐ fordable  mortgage  program   based  health  center  construction  o Voted  against  H.R.    836  which  would   o Doesn’t  run  a  good  business  and   terminate  the  Emergency  Mortgage  Re-­‐ doesn’t  support  a  good  economy   lief  program  while  Jim  Renacci  voted   o Voted  to  support  the  Ryan-­‐Renacci  plan   the  for  the  termination  of  the  program   takes  and  unbalanced  approach  to  bal-­‐o Supports  businesses  and  growth  by   ancing  the  budget.    He  believes  that   voting  against  party  lines  and  voted  in   cutting  taxes  for  the  most  wealthy,  in-­‐ favor  of  H.R.    9  the  Small  Business  tax   creasing  defense  spending  and  denying   cut food  stamps  to  the  needy  and  Medicare   to  seniors  will  balance  the  budget. Renacci  on  Sutton   Renacci  on  Renacci  o Fiscally  irresponsible  and  supports   o As  a  business  owner  knows  the  value  of   needless  spending.    Sutton  voted  for   a  balanced  budget  and  supported  the   the  “most  irresponsible  budget  in   Balanced  Budget  Amendment   American  history”  in  2009  ($3.5  bil-­‐ o Voted  to  pass  the  Republican  House   lion)   Budget  which  “saved  Medicare  while  o Opposes  requiring  a  balanced  budget,   restoring  fiscal  order  to  Washington.”   she  voted  against  the  Balanced  Budget   o Opposes  wasteful  spending  and  is  lead-­‐ Amendment  that  passed  in  the  U.S.     ing  fight  for  fiscal  order   House  of  Representatives   o “American  families  and  business  own-­‐o Supported  the  wasteful  “stimulus”   ers  have  to  balance  their  books  every   spending  package  which  incurred  the   day…why  shouldn’t  the  government” largest  single  year  deficit  in  U.S.    histo-­‐ ry Strategic  Implications   Renacci   has   a   slight   advantage   when   dealing   with   the   subject   of   the   economy   and   the   federal  budget.    Sutton  has  been  in  Congress  for  6  years,  during  which  time  the  economy   has   struggled.     However,   Betty   Sutton   has   taken   important   steps   to   safeguard   and   im-­‐ prove  the  local  Ohio  economy,  such  as  promoting  manufacturing.    We  plan  to  focus  on   these   accomplishments   early   to   prevent   Renacci   from   defining   Sutton’s   stance   on   the   economy.    We  can  predict  that  the  Renacci  campaign  will  likely  attack  some  of  Rep.    Sut-­‐ ton’s   votes   specifically   regarding   the   Balanced   Budget   Amendment   and   her   votes   re-­‐ garding  the  stimulus  package.    It  is  important  that  we  are  able  to  shift  the  focus  to  her   accomplishments   rather   than   allow   the   Renacci   campaign   to   highlight   aspects   of   her   voting  record  that  could  be  politically  spun  in  a  negative  way.     50  
  • Energy  and  Oil   Sutton  on  Sutton   Sutton  on  Renacci  o Believes  in  green  energy  and  the  reduc-­‐ o Supports  the  Keystone  Pipeline  and   tion  of  greenhouse  gases,  Need  to  look   fracking  which  would  pollute  Ohio  riv-­‐ to  the  future  but  still  support  the  past   ers  and  not  solve  the  problem  of  lower  o Supports  Oil  drilling  on  land  that  has   gas  prices   already  been  leased  by  the  Oil  compa-­‐ o Doesn’t  believe  in  clean  energy  or  pro-­‐ nies  rather  than  off-­‐shore  which  would   tecting  the  environment   cause  even  more  negative  environmen-­‐ o Supports  Offshore  drilling   tal  effects   o Does  not  support  the  development  of  o Introduced  the  program  Cash  for   the  clean  energy  business  which  could   Clunkers  which  promoted  use  for  ener-­‐ produce  thousands  of  jobs  in  Ohio   gy  efficient  cars  in  2009  o Voted  to  give  tax  incentives  for  energy   production  and  conservation   Renacci  on  Sutton   Renacci  on  Renacci  o Is  artificially  keeping  the  price  of  oil   o Strongly  opposed  to  the  Cap  and  Trade   high  because  she  does  not  support   energy  tax   things  like  the  Keystone  XL  Pipeline  or   o Supports  offshore  drilling  and  fracking   methods  such  as  fracking   in  order  to  lower  the  price  of  oil  and  in-­‐o Does  not  see  the  benefits  of  adding   crease  the  number  of  jobs  in  Ohio.   good  jobs  to  Ohio  through  developing   fracking  or  other  methods  that  could   lower  gas  prices  in  addition  to  raising   employment.    Strategic  Implications  Betty   Sutton   has   a   slight   advantage   in   relation   to   this   issue.     While   her   stance   on   Energy  and  Oil  is  appealing,  it  is  a  matter  of  framing.    While  this  issue  is  less  of  a  hot  topic  in  the  election,   it   is   related   into   jobs   and   the   economy.     Sutton   needs   to   show   that   she   is   in  support  of  current  types  of  energy  because  of  the  number  of  jobs  in  this  industry.    This  can  be  seen  through  her  support  of  legislation  encouraging  oil  companies  to  drill  on  land  already   leased.     She   must   also   focus   on   moving   on   towards   clean   energy   to   satisfy   the  democratic  base.    Furthermore,  Betty  Sutton  sponsored  the  Cash  for  Clunkers  program  which  was  immensely  popular  in  Ohio  because  it  allowed  Americans  to  afford  more  en-­‐ergy  efficient  cars  while  stimulating  the  auto  parts  industry  in  Ohio.    Jim  Renacci  votes  consistently  against  the  new  energy  business.       51  
  • Homeland  Security/Military   Sutton  on  Sutton   Sutton  on  Renacci  o Committed  to  the  security  of  America   o Supports  keeping  Guantanamo  Bay  o Passed  legislation  to  support  Border   open  and  supports  the  governmental   Patrol,  security  fencing,  and  is  part  of   ability  to  detain  “enemy  combatants”   the  Law  Enforcement  Caucus   without  proper  trial  o Voted  to  in  favor  of  mandatory  troop   o Allowing  all  of  the  atrocities  that  occur   rest  periods  between  deployments  to   at  Guantanamo  to  keep  going  to  keep-­‐ Iraq   ing  it  open  o Co-­‐sponsored  a  bill  to  toughen  sanc-­‐ o Supported  the  extension  of  the  PATRI-­‐ tions  on  Iran  and  promote  regional   OT  Acts  roving  wiretaps   stability  and  ensure  security  for  the   U.S.    and  its  allies  o Voted  against  reducing  Navy  and  Air   Force  Appropriations  o Supports  the  timely  but  strategic  re-­‐ moval  of  troops  from  Afghanistan  o Voted  against  extending  the  wiretaps  of   the  PATRIOT  Act   Renacci  on  Sutton   Renacci  on  Renacci  o She  voted  against  the  Ryan  Plan  which   o Ensuring  all  of  the  military  have  all  of   would  increase  spending  on  the  mili-­‐ the  equipment  they  need   tary   o Washington  needs  to  listen  to  the  ad-­‐o Reckless  with  the  military  because  she   vice  of  the  generals  currently  on  the   voted  to  disregard  the  advice  of  the   ground  in  Afghanistan   generals  in  Afghanistan  and  is  pulling   o Voted  for  the  Ryan  plan  which  would   the  troops  out  too  early   be  an  increase  in  spending    Strategic  Implications  Betty  Sutton  has  strong  positions  supporting  the  military.    Military  issues  are  not  going  to   be   crucial   to   the   2012   election   cycle   while   most   voters   are   focused   on   jobs   and   the  economy.     Rep.     Sutton   voted   to   close   down   Guantanamo   Bay   and   supports   bringing   the  troops  home  from  Afghanistan.    Rep.    Sutton  has  also  voted  to  toughen  sanctions  against  Iran  and  protect  funding  for  the  Navy  and  the  Air  Force.    Jim  Renacci  may  try  to  paint  Sutton  as  anti-­‐military  and  the  campaign  should  be  prepared  to  respond  to  those  attacks  based  off  of  her  record  supporting  veterans  and  protecting  military  funding.     52  
  • Targeting 9
Strategy  Overview  R unning   in   the   newly   redistricted   Ohio   16th   Congressional   District   (CD   16)   will  be  an  uphill  battle  for  any  Democratic  candidate.      It  is  not  unfair  to  say  that   during   the   redistricting   process   the   Republican-­‐controlled   state   legislature   gerry-­‐mandered  this  district  to  be  easier  for  a  Republican  candidate  to  win.  But  there  is  still  a  clear  path  to  victory  for  Betty  Sutton.      The  Sutton  Campaign  will  have  to   go   beyond   average   Democratic   performance   and   reach   out   to   undecided   voters   in  order  to  win.      As  a  three-­‐term  and  former  state  legislator  Betty  Sutton  can  use  her  rec-­‐ord  of  achievement  to  help  win  over  persuadable  voters.  In   CD   16,   Democratic   performance   averages   at   45   percent,   and   the   campaign   can   antici-­‐pate   that   at   least   160,703   votes   will   be   cast   for   Sutton   based   on   past   Democratic   per-­‐formance.      But,  because  the  new  16th  Congressional  District  is  skewed  slightly  Republi-­‐can,  the  campaign  can  expect  that,  if  Sutton  runs  at  historical  Democratic  performance,  the  campaign  will  be  facing  a  vote  deficit  of  22,546  votes.    The  following  section  outlines  key  persuadable  groups  in  the  district,  the  campaign’s  targeting  strategy,  and  the  cam-­‐paign’s  vote  goals.        Turnout  and  Expected  Vote  In   the   2012   election   cycle,   Ohio   will   be   the   focus   of   several   prominent   campaigns.      There  will  be  a  high  profile  Senate  race  between  incumbent  Sherrod  Brown  (D)  and  Josh     53  
  • Mandel  (R),  and  the  state  will  once  again  be  a  battleground  in  the  presidential  election  between  Mitt  Romney  and  Barack  Obama.      As  a  result,  turnout  in  the  16th  Congression-­‐al  district  is  expected  be  high.  Historically,  the  counties  in  the  16th  District  have  had  high  turnout.    In  2004,  the  coun-­‐ties  in  the  16th  District  had  an  average  turnout  of  72.5  percent  and  in  2008,  they  aver-­‐aged  a  turnout  of  68  percent.      Because  this  is  a  new  district  that  does  not  break  down  along  clear  county  lines,  we  have  used  historic  turnout  data  from  the  counties  and  the  old   16th   District   to   project   a   72   percent   turnout   district-­‐wide   for   the   2012   election   (see  chart  below).        To  determine  the  expected  vote  we  multiplied  the  expected  turnout  percentage  by  the  number  of  registered  voters  in  the  district  using  voter  file  data  obtained  from  the  Ohio  Secretary   of   State’s   office.       From   this   data,   we   can   expect   that   352,402   ballots   will   be  cast  in  this  election.        At  the  absolute  minimum,  our  win  number  must  be  176,202  votes,  or  50  percent  of  the  total  expected  vote  plus  1.               54  
  • County   Total   16th  Dis-­‐ Total  Count   Total  Coun-­‐ 16th  Dis-­‐ Estimated   County  %   trict  %   %  Turnout   ty  %  Turn-­‐ trict  %   2012  %   Turnout   Turnout   2004   out  2010   Turnout   Turnout   2008   2008   2010  Cuyahoga   60.54%   78%   68.33%   48.15%   57%   68.96%  Medina   60.54%   72%   72.73%   51.13%   52%   68.30%  Portage   72.05%   75%   70.86%   45.95%   53%   72.68%  Stark   70.09%   77%   71.58%   48.75%   56%   72.92%  Summit   70.76%   79%   76.38%   53.10%   56%   75.32%  Wayne   72.24%   67%   75.48%   48.69%   49%   71.43%    Vote  Goal      Since  this  is  an  incumbent  vs.    incumbent  race,  we  expect  it  to  be  close.    Recent  polls  also  suggest  that  the  race  is  close.    To  account  for  possible  changes  in  turnout  and  to  give  the  campaign   a   safer   margin   of   victory,   we   have   set   a   vote   goal   of   winning   52   percent   of   the  expected  vote,  or  183,249  votes  district-­‐wide.         Counties   2012  Estimated   Win  Number  =  50%  +   Initial  Vote  Goal  =   Turnout   1   52%  Cuyahoga   128,495   64,248   66,817  Medina   54,811   27,406   28,502  Portage   16,234   8,118   8,442  Stark   56,614   28,308   29,439  Summit   42,099   21,051   21,892  Wayne   54,149   27,076   28,158    Total   352,402   176,207   183,249           55  
  • Democratic  Performance  and  Democratic  Base  The  Democratic  Performance  Index  (DPI)  measures  the  percentage  of  the  vote  an  aver-­‐age  Democratic  candidate  can  expect  to  win  in  the  district.      Using  voting  history  from  the   counties   in   the   16th   District,   we   have   estimated   the   DPI   for   each   county   by   taking  the   number   of   votes   for   the   Democratic   candidate   and   dividing   it   by   the   total   number   of  votes  cast.      For  the  majority  of  the  district,  we  have  assumed  the  DPI  for  the  county  will  hold  true  for  the  portion  of  the  county  included  in  the  16th  Congressional  District.    How-­‐ever,   because   Cuyahoga   County   contains   Cleveland,   and   our   district   does   not,   we   have  averaged   the   DPI   for   the   seven   precincts   in   the   county   that   do   not   include   the   city   of  Cleveland.       We   adjusted   the   DPI   for   the   Cuyahoga   County   portion   of   the   16th   District  based   on   the   Democratic   performance   of   16th   District   precincts   in   Cuyahoga   County,  rather  than  using  the  countywide  estimate.          Counties   Dem  Pres-­‐ Dem  Per-­‐ Dem  Per-­‐ Dem  Per-­‐ Dem  Per-­‐ Dem  Per-­‐ idential   formance   formance   formance   formance   formance   perfor-­‐ by  US  Rep*   by  2010   by  Attorney   by  Senate   by  SOS   mance   in  2008   Gov   General   2010   2010   2008   2010  Cuya-­‐ 68.00%   58.66%   58.15%   59.73%   54.58%   54.39%  hoga  Medina   45%   50.44%   36.98%   37.55%   30.08%   31.90%  Portage   52.99%   57.71   45.63%   46.21%   37.22%   40.43%  Stark   51.10%   54.79%   44.88%   45.06%   38.06%   39.88%  Summit   57.28%   57%   47.58%   48.03%   41.78%   42.44%  Wayne   41.05%   47.16%   36.89%   35.08%   27.89%   29.40%           56  
  • Adjusted  Cuyahoga  County  Democratic  Performance   Precinct   DPI  based  on  2008  election  Parma  07F   56.39%  Rocky  River  03A   52.92%  Olmsted  Township  G   50.46%  Olmsted  Township  H   57.86%  Strongsville  03L   52.45%  Strongsville  04C   39.82%  North  Royalton  01D   44.84%  Average   50.67%    District-­‐wide,  we  estimate  that  the  DPI  is  45  percent,  but  it  varies  significantly  across  the  counties  within  the  district.      Using  the  anticipated  Democratic  performance,  we  can  es-­‐timate  the  Democratic  turnout  in  each  county.      Cuyahoga  County  is  the  highest  Demo-­‐cratic  performing  area  and  Wayne  County  is  the  lowest  Democratic  performing  area.  To   determine   the   Democratic   base,   we   used   the   results   for   three   Democratic   candidates  with   major   losses   in   the   2010   Senate,   Secretary   of   State,   and   Treasurer’s   races.       For   the  entire  district,  the  Democratic  base  averages  at  about  39  percent.      However,  some  coun-­‐ties  within  the  district  are  higher  performing  for  Democrats  than  others,  both  in  terms  of  their  DPI  and  the  Democratic  base  vote.      For  the  entire  district,  our  expected  Demo-­‐cratic  vote,  which  is  the  estimated  turnout  multiplied  by  the  DPI,  equals  160,703  votes.           57  
  • County   Initial  Vote  Goal   Dem  Performance  %   Estimated  Dem   Turnout  Cuyahoga   66,817   51%   65,532  Medina   28,502   39%   21,376  Portage   8,442   47%   7,630  Stark   29,439   46%   26,042  Summit   21,892   49%   20,629  Wayne   28,158   36%   19,494  Total   183,249   45%   160,703    Vote  Deficit  and  Persuadable  Voters  The  new  16th  District  is  skewed  slightly  Republican,  and  as  a  result  the  Sutton  campaign  has  a  vote  deficit  in  each  county.      Despite  higher  Democratic  performance  in  some  coun-­‐ties,  the  campaign  will  need  to  make  up  22,546  votes  from  persuadable  targets  to  meet  the  vote  goal  of  183,249  required  to  win  with  52  percent.  For   the   entire   district,   the   percentage   of   persuadable   voters   averages   at   26   percent,  though  it  does  vary  slightly  by  county.      In  order  to  meet  vote  goals,  we  needed  a  larger  persuadable   universe.       To   calculate   the   larger   persuadable   universe,   we   looked   at  statewide  races  in  which  there  were  significant  wins  for  Democrats  and  three  separate  but   similar   races   where   there   were   significant   wins   for   Republicans.       The   races   with  significant   Republican   wins   were   the   2010   Senate,   Secretary   of   State,   and   Treasurer’s  races.      We  used  Democratic  performance  in  each  county  for  each  of  these  races  to  de-­‐termine  that  absolute  Democratic  base  that  a  generic  Democratic  candidate  can  count  on  even  in  a  terrible  year.      We  determined  the  same  base  for  Republicans  using  the  2006  Senate,   Governor   and   Secretary   of   State’s   races.       We   then   averaged   the   performance  numbers  for  those  races  to  determine  the  average  party  performance  in  each  county  in     58  
  • the   16th   District.       By   subtracting   those   percentages   for   each   county   from   100%,   we  were   able   to   create   a   persuadable   universe   from   which   the   campaign   will   have   to   win  voters  in  order  to  meet  the  vote  goals  required  to  win.      For  the  campaign,  this  means  that   we   will   have   to   pull   in   independents   and   perhaps   in   some   areas   even   some   split  ticket  Republicans  who  might  cast  ballots  for  both  Mitt  Romney  and  Betty  Sutton.     County   Vote  Difference   Persuasion  %   Persuadable  Voters  Cuyahoga   -­‐1,285   22%   28,269  Medina   -­‐7,125   30%   16,443  Portage   -­‐812   29%   4,708  Stark   -­‐3,397   25%   14,153  Summit   -­‐1,263   27%   11,367  Wayne   -­‐8,664   24%   12,996  Total   -­‐22,546   26%  (average)   87,936      Geographic  Targets  The   campaign   will   geographically   target   voters   by   county.     Our   voterfile   data   has   al-­‐lowed  us  to  gather  population  size  and  expected  turnout  at  the  county  level.    We  will  use  these   projections,   as   well   as   expected   Democratic   performance   for   each   county   to   de-­‐termine   where   geographically   we   will   spend   our   resources   to   combat   our   expected   vote  deficit.               59  
  • Cuyahoga  County  Cuyahoga   County   will   be   a   major   component   of   our   geographic   targeting   operation.    With  its  186,341  possible  voters,  Cuyahoga  County  contains  37%  of  our  voting  popula-­‐tion.    It  also  contains  the  highest  number  of  our  persuadable  voters.    Cuyahoga  County  has  voted  for  Betty  Sutton  in  the  past,  while  Jim  Renacci  has  never  held  office  in  Cuya-­‐hoga  County.    We  believe  this  is  a  population  with  strong  name  ID  for  Betty  Sutton,  and  a  population  that  has  seen  her  accomplishments  firsthand.  Cuyahoga  County  will  be  our  primary  GOTV  target  because  of  its  population,  likelihood  to   vote   for   Democrats   in   past   elections   and   the   likely   availability   of   additional   resources  in  the  county   by   the   state   Democratic  Party  and  other  campaigns.    We  will  push  for  sup-­‐port  from  a  coordinated  campaign  with  the  party  in  this  county.      Cuyahoga   County   is   one   of   our   most   important   target   counties   for   persuadable   voters.    We  expect  a  universe  of  28,269  persuadable  voters  in  this  county.    We  also  expect  that  because   the   county   has   an   unemployment   rate   of   7.1%   and   likely   has   many   suburban  commuters   to   the   city   of   Cleveland,   we   will   be   able   to   reach   these   voters   on   the   issue   of  an  improving  economy  and  more  progressive  issues  than  other  counties  in  our  district.        Medina  County  Medina  County  has  80,246  voters  in  CD  16.    Because  of  the  large  voting  population  and  the   fact   that   Medina   County   was   previously   represented   by   both   Betty   Sutton   and   Jim  Renacci  before  redistricting,  we  believe  it  will  be  important  to  focus  persuasion  efforts  here.    This  county  will  know  both  candidates  by  name,  and  will  likely  be  a  highly  con-­‐tested  county.         60  
  • Because   we   expect   the   economy   to   be   the   primary   issue   in   this   election   and   because  Medina  has  a  6.3%  unemployment  rate  –  approximately  2%  below  the  rest  of  the  nation  and  also  below  Ohio  statewide  numbers  -­‐  Medina  County  will  be  our  primary  target  for  persuasion  voters.    Medina  County  has  an  expected  persuasion  universe  of  16,443  vot-­‐ers.    The  county  houses  a  number  of  manufacturing  industry  workers  such  as  a  plant  for  Shiloh  Industries,  and  MTD  Products  -­‐  a  tractor  manufacturing  plant.    We  believe  we  can  make  a  strong,  persuasive  appeal  to  the  blue  collar  and  union  workers  in  this  county.        With  a  Median  household  income  of  $66,000,  Medina  County  is  the  most  affluent  county  in  CD  16.    Though  the  case  could  be  made  that  they  are  poised  to  vote  for  a  candidate  who   can   promise   not   to   raise   taxes,   we   believe   the   stronger   argument   is   that   the   econo-­‐my  is  on  the  upswing  and  that,  because  of  Rep.  Sutton,  jobs  have  stayed  in  Medina  Coun-­‐ty.    The  argument  that  folks  in  Medina  County  are  truly  the  middle  class  and  that  Betty  Sutton  is  looking  out  for  their  interests  will  also  be  a  key  contrast  the  Sutton  campaign  will  draw  between  Rep.  Sutton  and  Renacci.    Lastly,  because  of  the  relative  wealth  of  this  county,  it  will  be  important  in  the  campaign’s  individual  donor  fundraising  efforts.    Portage  County  We  expect  to  spend  some  time  on  persuasion  here  due  to  the  fact  that  neither  Betty  Sut-­‐ton  nor  Jim  Renacci  have  represented  this  county  before.    Therefore,  we  will  also  spend  some  time  introducing  the  candidate  to  voters  here.      Portage  County’s  major  employers  are  manufacturing  and  healthcare  services.    We  be-­‐lieve   Rep.   Sutton   has   a   strong   case   to   make   in   this   county   that   her   record   reflects   the  needs  of  this  community  better  than  Renacci’s.    In  Portage  we  will  appeal  to  healthcare  workers   by   discussing   our   healthcare   priorities,   such   as   women’s   health,   medicare,     61  
  • breast   cancer   awareness,   etc.     Because   of   these   values,   we   plan   to   specifically   target  women  in  this  county  as  well.    We  will  also  spend  time  talking  about  our  record  on  union  and   workers   rights,   and   priorities   to   keep   jobs   in   America   and   promotion   of   “buying  American.”    Portage  County  is  currently  has  a  7.8%  unemployment  rate.    Though  this  is  less  than  the  national   average,   it   is   higher   than   most   of   Ohio.     There   is   a   case   to   be   made   that   the  economy  is  turning  around  and  that  the  current  path  is  the  one  voters  should  keep.    Por-­‐tage  has  a  median  household  income  of  $50,000.    This  population,  like  much  of  CD  16,  is  the  middle  class  Americans  Betty  Sutton  is  working  for.  Portage  County  will  not  be  a  major  target  for  GOTV  votes  because  it  has  only  16,000  of  our  expected  voters  -­‐  4.6%  of  our  expected  vote  -­‐  we  will  not  spend  a  major  part  of  our  time  in  this  county  towards  the  end  of  the  election.        Summit  County  Summit  County  has  voted  for  Betty  Sutton  in  the  past  three  elections.    They  have  never  been   represented   by   Jim   Renacci.     We   expect   a   large   number   of   voters   who   recognize  Betty  Sutton  and  who  do  not  know  Jim  in  this  county.    Because  of  this,  we  will  not  spend  time  on  candidate  introduction.    Rather,  a  limited  amount  of  time  will  be  spent  on  per-­‐suasion  for  persuadable  voters  in  this  county.      In   Summit   County,   Betty   Sutton   will   be   able   to   focus   the   conversation   on   manufacturing  and   jobs   as   she   will   in   other   counties.     She   will   also   be   able   to   appeal   to   healthcare  workers  and  government  employees  who  are  some  of  the  largest  groups  of  employees  in  Summit.    Though  Summit  County  currently  has  a  7.8%  unemployment  rate,  unemploy-­‐   62  
  • ment  has  decreased  substantially  from  the  11.5%  unemployment  experienced  in  2010.    Rep.  Sutton  has  a  strong  argument  to  make  that  the  job  promotion  bills,  her  stance  on  workers  rights,  and  her  promotion  of  “buy  American”  has  helped  effect  this  downturn.  We   have   an   expected   turnout   of   42,000   in   Summit   County,   about   12%   of   the   district  vote.    We  will  spend  some  time  on  GOTV  here  because  of  that.     We  also  expect  to  exceed  Democratic  performance  in  this  county  based  on  name  ID  and  Rep.  Sutton’s  record.    Stark  County  Stark   County   is   one   of   the   two   counties   that   voted   for   Jim   Renacci   in   the   last   election,  and  has  never  been  represented  by  Betty  Sutton.    We  expect,  because  of  this  and  other  factors,   Stark   County   will   be   one   of   our   worst   performing   counties.     For   our   projections,  we  are  expecting  to  run  at  average  Democratic  performance.    We  do  not  expect  to  win  many   persuadable   voters   here,   and   will   not   devote   significant   campaign   resources   to-­‐wards  persuasion  or  GOTV  in  Stark  County.  Stark  County  is  home  to  a  large  manufacturing  industry,  but  is  currently  experiencing  an  8.3%   unemployment   rate,   which   has   improved   from   an   unemployment   rate   of   13.2%   in  2010.      However,  the  current  unemployment  rate  is  higher  than  the  national  average  and  much   higher   than   Ohio   statewide   average.     We   expect   to   be   hit   hard   in   this   county   on  economic  issues  including  the  national  budget,  spending  and  jobs.    While  we  do  have  a  better   record   than   Jim   Renacci   in   keeping   jobs   in   Ohio   and   promoting   job   growth,   we  fully  expect  to  be  tied  to  the  administration  and  blamed  for  the  suffering  of  Stark  County  voters.    The  relatively  high  unemployment  rate  here  will  make  this  attack  resonate  more  than  in  other  areas  of  the  district.       63  
  • Wayne  County  Wayne   County   is   the   second   county   in   the   district   that   has   never   voted   for   Betty   Sutton,  but  has  been  represented  by  Jim  Renacci  since  the  last  election  cycle.    We  know  that  our  name  ID  will  be  low  in  this  county.     In  2008,  Democratic  performance  was  at  40%.    That  was   almost   10%   higher   than   it   was   in   2010.     We   know   that   this   is   a   tough   county   for  Rep.  Sutton  and  we  are  projecting  to  run  no  higher  than  Democratic  performance  here.    We  will  not  spend  much  of  our  resources  persuading  voters  or  on  GOTV  in  Wayne  Coun-­‐ty.    Demographic  Targets  In   addition   to   targeting   geographically,   we   will   also   target   persuadable   voters   demo-­‐graphically.      Though  our  final  demographic  targets  will  be  informed  by  our  polling  re-­‐search,  we  can  expect  that  key  demographic  groups  can  include  the  following:    Seniors  and  Retirees:    Rep.  Sutton  is  a  strong  opponent  of  the  Ryan  budget,  particularly  because   damage   it   would   do   to   Medicare   benefits.       She   opposes   privatization   of   both  Medicare   and   Social   Security.       Recent   special   elections,   including   Kathy   Hochul   in   the  NY-­‐26   and   Suzanne   Bonamici   in   the   OR-­‐01,   have   shown   that   opposition   to   the   Ryan  budget  can  be  an  effective  message  with  seniors.      She  has  been  an  advocate  for  lowering  prescription   drugs   costs   for   seniors   by   requiring   drug   companies   to   negotiate   prices.      Betty  Sutton  also  has  a  strong  voting  record  supporting  retirees  and  has  been  endorsed  by   the   Alliance   for   Retired   Americans.     This   is   a   key   area   where   Betty   can   distinguish  herself  from  her  opponent  since  Jim  Renacci  supported  the  Ryan-­‐Renacci  plan.           64  
  • Labor  Unions:    Because  of  her  background  as  a  labor  lawyer  and  her  strong  record  sup-­‐porting   unions,   labor   is   a   key   base   for   Rep.   Sutton.       Her   support   for   manufacturing,   a  key  industry  in  the  district,  also  gives  her  an  opening  to  win  over  persuadable  voters  in  the  labor  community.      Betty  Sutton  has  consistently  voted  to  protect  the  right  of  work-­‐ers   to   organize   and   collectively   bargain.       In   2011,   the   Ohio   state   legislature   passed   a  Wisconsin-­‐style  bill  to  restrict  the  rights  of  public  sector  unions  to  collectively  bargain,  which  became  a  ballot  initiative  known  as  Issue  2.      The  ballot  initiative  failed  with  63  percent  voting  against  it  (meaning  they  were  voting  against  restricting  the  rights  of  un-­‐ions).      Rep.  Sutton  was  very  opposed  to  Issue  2,  appearing  at  rallies  to  speak  against  the  issue.    Blue  Collar  Workers:    Rep.  Sutton  also  has  room  to  persuade  blue-­‐collar  workers.      She  has  been  a  vital  supporter  of  manufacturing  jobs  in  Ohio.      She  sponsored  the  Cash  for  Clunkers   legislation   which   created   more   demand   for   auto   parts,   a   major   part   of   the  manufacturing  industry  in  CD  16.      Rep.  Sutton  has  also  been  a  staunch  supporter  of  buy-­‐ing   American   made   products   and   has   also   sponsored   legislation   to   require   the   use   of  American   iron,   steel   and   manufacturing   goods   in   public   works   repairs.       She   has   also  voted   against   recent   trade   agreements   with   Korea,   Panama   and   Colombia   because   of  concerns  about  how  they  would  affect  Ohio  manufacturing  jobs  and  exports.        Veterans:     Betty   Sutton   is   the   daughter   of   a   World   War   II   veteran,   and   has   worked   to  continue   supporting   veterans   as   a   member   of   Congress.       She   was   instrumental   in   keep-­‐ing  a  local  Veteran’s  Administration  medical  facility  from  being  moved  to  a  different  ar-­‐ea,   which   would   have   limited   some   veterans’   access   to   care.     It   also   would   have   had   a  negative   impact   on   local   jobs.     Betty   Sutton   was   also   a   cosponsor   of   the   new   GI   bill,     65  
  • which  helped  provide  more  opportunities  for  new  generations  of  veterans  to  get  a  col-­‐lege  degree.          Independent  and  Soft  Republican  Women:    As  a  female  candidate  running  against  a  man,  Betty  Sutton  has  several  openings  to  appeal  to  and  win  over  persuadable  women  voters.      She  has  been  a  strong  proponent  of  women’s  access  to  healthcare  services  and  contraception.      She  has  supported  equal  pay  for  women.      There  are  also  opportunities  to   use   Rep.   Sutton’s   record   on   children’s   healthcare   and   education   to   move   these   per-­‐suadable  voters.      Additionally,  Betty  has  strong  credibility  on  economic  issues  that  will  likely  be  the  focus  of  the  campaign  across  multiple  demographics,  but  specifically  with  working  women  and  unemployed  women.    Vote  History  Targets  and  Micro-­‐targets  Because  we  will  need  to  outrun  expected  Democratic  performance  in  this  district  to  win,  we  will  focus  a  considerable  amount  of  resources,  especially  field  time,  on  some  micro-­‐targeted  voter  populations.    We  recognize  that  we  may  not  be  able  to  rely  on  a  coordi-­‐nated  campaign  for  some  targets  because  they  are  not  ID-­‐ing  positive  for  the  President,  though  they  may  for  us.        Supported  President  Obama  in  2008,  but  won’t  in  2010  Though   we   assume   the   Obama   campaign   will   be   working   to   turnout   his   positive   IDs  from   the   last   election,   we   expect   a   certain   amount   of   crossover   voting   in   our   more   rural  counties.     Specifically,   Medina   County   will   be   a   major   focus   of   this   potential   crossover  effect  for  the  campaign.    In  2008,  Medina  County  saw  an  increase  of  nearly  six  percent     66  
  • (5.7%)  registration  from  the  previous  presidential  election.    Though  a  number  of  factors  could   have   contributed   to   the   increased   registration,   it   is   likely   that   the   majority   of   it  came  from  new  registrations  brought  out  by  the  Obama  campaign  in  2008.    To  put  this  in   context,   the   other   four   counties   in   the   district   (excluding   Cuyahoga   County)   averaged  an  increase  in  registration  of  only  1.2%.    We  believe  Medina  County  was  a  major  focus  of  the  Obama  registration  movement  in  2008.      In  2010,  Medina  County  saw  a  decrease  of  over  20%  turnout,  and  a  decrease  of  nearly  15%  in  democratic  performance.    We  believe  there  are  a  number  of  voters  in  this  county  specifically,  but  perhaps  throughout  the  rural  parts  of  the  district  who  voted  for  Obama  in  2008,  but  have  been  unhappy  with  the  Administration  since  2009  or  2010.    Because  Betty  Sutton  has  a  history  in  a  number  of  these  counties,  and  she  can  speak  to  her  job  creation  record  and  her  support  of  industry,  we  think  she  has  an  opportunity  to  collect  votes  from  people  who  voted  Democratic  in  2008,  and  either  didn’t  vote  in  2010,  or  vot-­‐ed  Republican  in  2010.        2008  First  Time  Voters  In   2008,   Cuyahoga   County   saw   an   increase   of   over   eight   percent   (8.2%)   of   registered  voters.    Though  we  know  in  this  county  specifically  many  of  these  voters  may  reside  in  Cleveland,  we  expect  this  population  of  2008  first  time  voters  will  be  more  likely  to  vote  Democratic  if  we  can  bring  them  out  to  the  polls  again  this  year.    It  is  likely  this  will  be  a  large  portion  of  our  young  and  minority  populations.           67  
  • Young  Voters  Though  the  district  is  new,  we  expect  a  little  over  100,000  registered  voters  in  this  dis-­‐trict  are  between  the  ages  of  18  to  34.    This  is  nearly  a  fifth  of  our  registered  voter  popu-­‐lation.    It  is  likely  the  Obama  Campaign  will  be  reaching  out  to  this  same  demographic,  but   because   of   “down-­‐ballot   fatigue”   we   will   need   to   reach   out   to   these   voters   as   well   to  make  sure  they  either  vote  straight  ticket,  or  continue  voting  down  the  ballot.        ID  Positive  for  Sharrod  Brown,  but  not  President  Obama  We  expect  to  find  the  IDs  for  this  target  through  our  first  Benchmark  poll.    Because  Betty  Sutton   filled   the   House   seat   of   former   Congressman   and   current   Senator   Brown,   there  could  be  ties  to  this  name,  but  these  IDs  may  not  all  be  Democrats.    This  will  need  to  be  confirmed  through  research  and  polling  data,  but  we  expect  to  find  a  universe  of  voters  who  like  Betty  Sutton  for  her  hometown  roots  and  our  ties  to  the  state  and  the  current  Senator,  but  don’t  associate  us  with  the  negative  feelings  they  may  have  for  Obama.               68  
  • Field 10Overview  T he   field   team   for   the   Sutton   campaign   will   consist   of   one   field   director   and   two   paid   organizers.     The   organizers   will   manage   the   field   offices   in   Cuya-­‐hoga   County   and   Summit   County.     The   field   plan   is   based   largely   on   volunteer   efforts,  geographic   targeting,   and   micro-­‐targeting   based   on   polling   information   and   voter   file  data.      The  field  plan  will  be  broken  into  three  basic  phases:  ID,  Persuasion,  and  GOTV.    Though  these  parts  will  operationally  overlap––much  of  it  toward  the  end  of  the  campaign––-­‐the  broad  focus  of  the  campaign’s  field  efforts  will  revolve  around  this  schedule.  While   it   is   too   early   to   determine   specific   micro-­‐targets   for   our   field   efforts,   the   cam-­‐paign   has   general   targeting   data   based   on   geography   and   the   voter   file   which   can   be  used  to  begin  the  field  campaign.    As  the  campaign  learns  more  about  the  district’s  vot-­‐ing   population,   aspects   of   this   plan   will   become   more   specific   and   micro-­‐targets   will   be-­‐come  more  clearly  defined.      The   work   conducted   by   the   field   operation   will   be   boots-­‐on-­‐the-­‐ground,   grassroots  campaigning.     Field   operations   will   also   act   as   a   barometer   gauging   people’s   support   for  Sutton.     If   the   other   pieces   of   the   campaign   plan   work   as   they   should,   we   should   be   able  to  see  support  growing  for  Sutton  through  field  operation  voter  ID.         69  
  •  Identification  The  Sutton  campaign  has  a  persuasion  universe  of  87,976  voters  and  the  very  first  step  of  the  field  operation  will  be  to  begin  identifying  support.    This  will  complement  the  data  already   present   in   the   campaign   voter   file.     The   identification   process   will   take   place  through  phone  banks  and  canvasses  run  by  the  organizers  and  staffed  with  volunteers.      For   the   purposes   of   the   identification   process,   the   campaign   will   use   a   basic,   the   1  through  3  voter  measurement  index.    Supports  Betty  Sutton    Undecided    Supports  Jim  Renacci  We   are   choosing   to   use   this   measurement,   which   ignores   the   typical   “lean   Sutton”   or  “lean  Renacci”  identification,  because  we  have  a  vote  deficit  of  22,546  and  will  need  to  make  up  those  votes  among  many  independent  and  even  crossover  Republican  voters.      Canvassers  and  phone  bankers  will  be  instructed  to  log  all  calls  that  seem  to  lean  toward  one  candidate  or  the  other  as  undecided.      Since  we  need  to  use  a  large  persuadable  uni-­‐verse  to  make  up  our  vote  deficit,  we  will  work  for  every  undecided  vote,  regardless  of  lean.  We  believe  using  a  simpler  three-­‐part  voter  ID  system  will  also  help  keep  our  volunteers  motivated  as  volunteers  are  often  less  eager  to  make  calls  to  “leaning”  Republican  vot-­‐ers.      Voters  who  are  identified  as  a  supporter  of  the  campaign  will  be  given  information  on  how  to  request  an  absentee  ballot,  if  they  would  like  one,  during  canvassing.    The  cam-­‐   70  
  • paign  will  have  a  push  to  get  as  many  of  our  supporters  as  possible  to  vote  for  us  early.    Any  supporter  who  requests  a  ballot  and  sends  it  back  prior  to  Election  Day  is  one  less  GOTV  call  we  have  to  make,  and  one  less  door  to  knock  on.        Persuasion  The  persuasion  universe  for  the  16th  Congressional  District  is  87,976  voters.    The  cam-­‐paign   will   need   to   secure   22,546   of   these   votes   to   reach   our   vote   goal.     Following   the  identification  process  outlined  above,  the  campaign  will  move  into  the  persuasion  phase  for   those   identified   in   the   undecided   universe.     Though,   in   practice,   the   identification  phase  will  likely  continue  into  the  persuasion  phase,  scripts  will  change  so  that  an  unde-­‐cided  voter  can  be  more  thoroughly  informed  of  Sutton’s  stance  and  message.      Our  persuasion  universe  will  be  contacted  at  least  three  times  either  by  phone,  canvass  or  direct  mail.    Our  key  target  voters,  as  identified  through  our  ID  program  and  polling  research,  will  receive  a  combination  of  all  three  contact  methods.    Once  the  voter  file  is  purchased  we  will  be  better  able  to  judge  how  many  of  our  target  areas  are  walk-­‐able,  and   how   many   phone   numbers   we   have.     But,   our   persuasion   contact   will   follow   this  basic  formula:      Young  voters  will  likely  not  have  phone  numbers  on  the  voter  file.    The  field   operation  may  need  to  reach  them  through  mail  and/or  canvassing.    Voters  in  more  rural  areas  will  likely  receive  a  combination  of  phone  calls  and   direct  mail  if  their  area  is  difficult  to  canvass.    Voters  in  more  suburban  areas,  and  areas  close  to  our  campaign  offices  will   likely  receive  canvassing,  phones,  and  direct  mail.         71  
  •  Voters  who  fall  into  a  targeted  demographic  universe  will  likely  receive  mul-­‐ tiple  targeted  direct  mail  pieces  as  well  as  phone  calls  and  possibly  canvass-­‐ ing.        For  planning  purposes,  we  expect  that  calling  the  entire  universe  of  persuadable  voters  will  require  1,833  volunteer  shifts  (each  shift  is  a  four  hour  time  block).     Persuasion  by  County  Cuyahoga  County  Cuyahoga  County  contains  our  more  progressive  community.    Because  Democratic  per-­‐formance  in  this  county  is  the  highest  of  the  district,  this  universe  will  be  our  largest  ge-­‐ographic  target  for  GOTV.    We  expect  to  make  early  ID  calls  to  segregate  out  a  persua-­‐sion  universe  that  can  be  targeted  by  the  field  operation  in  Cuyahoga  County.    Though  early  ID  and  persuasion  calls  will  be  made  based  on  targeting  to  voters  in  this  county,  we  expect  much  of  our  work  early  on  will  be  recruiting  volunteers.    Medina  County    Medina  County  is  another  cornerstone  of  the  campaign’s  voter  mobilization  plan.    Cur-­‐rently  Medina  County  is  split  between  Sutton’s  13th  district  and  Renacci’s  16th  district.    It  will  therefore  be  important  to  drive  turnout  among  Sutton  supporters  in  her  portion  of  the  district  and  launch  a  persuasion  effort  in  Renacci’s  portion.    Early  canvass  efforts  are  to  be  concentrated  on  Medina  City  and  Wadsworth.    Voters  in  less  walkable  districts  will   be   targeted   by   phones.       Voter   ID   modeling   can   help   in   Medina   County   as   we   expect  to  find  demographics  like  independent  and  soft  Republican  women  that  can  be  specifi-­‐   72  
  • cally  targeted.      Targeted  mail  to  workers  in  manufacturing  industry  will  be  a  key  part  of  persuasion  efforts  in  Medina  County  as  well.    The  persuasion  universe  in  Medina  County  is  16,443  voters.    Summit  County    Summit  County  is  Betty  Sutton’s  home  county.    Due  to  redistricting,  Sutton  will  no  longer  be   representing   the   Akron   community   as   she   has   in   previous   terms.     We   expect   that  without  that  Democratic  stronghold  in  Summit,  the  campaign  will  need  to  do  some  per-­‐suasion  work  here,  with  some  resources  devoted  to  direct  mail  and  canvassing.      In  the  later  phases  of  our  field  plan,  this  county  will  primarily  be  used  as  a  base  energizer  with  a  focus  on  getting  out  the  vote  in  fundraising  efforts  and  target  literature.    This  is  cur-­‐rently  the  base  of  operations  for  the  campaign,  so  we  expect  a  higher  proportion  of  vol-­‐unteer  recruitment  out  of  this  county.    The  higher  volunteer  presence  will  help  us  per-­‐suade  the  additional  11,367  voters  we  will  expect  we  need  to  win  here  to  win.          Portage  County  Based   on   our   projections,   Portage   County   has   4,708   persuadable   voters.     Neither   Sutton  nor   Renacci   have   represented   any   party   of   this   county   in   past   years.     Both   will   be   work-­‐ing  to  introduce  themselves  to  this  small  population.    We  expect  to  spend  time  early  on  in   the   campaign   in   Portage   County   telling   Betty’s   story,   and   contrasting   her   record   to  Renacci’s.    Because  of  the  small  number  of  voters  in  this  county,  we  won’t  spend  large  amounts  of  the  candidate’s  time  here,  but  we  will  work  to  engage  these  voters  early  and  consistently  through  direct  mail  and  phones.    Sutton’s  alma  mater,  Kent  State  University,     73  
  • is   located   in   Portage   County.     There   may   be   opportunities   for   campus   engagement   in  volunteer  efforts.        Stark  County    Stark  County  was  represented  entirely  by  Renacci’s  old  Congressional  District.    We  ex-­‐pect   a   large  amount  of  persuadable   voters  here,  though  Renacci’s  name  ID,  and  his  in-­‐cumbency   in   this   county   may   hinder   movement   of   voters   in   our   direction.     We   won’t  spend   major   resources   in   this   county,   though   we   will   try   to   mitigate   damage.     We   will  introduce  ourselves  to  the  Democratic  voters  in  the  county  and  we  will  speak  with  our  persuadable  through  phone  and  direct  mail.    Parts  of  this  county  are  too  spread  out  to  canvass  effectively,  but  North  Canton  will  receive  some  canvassing  for  name  ID,  and  con-­‐trast  literature  drops.          Wayne  County  Wayne  County,  Renacci’s  home  county,  was  also  entirely  in  Renacci’s  old  Congressional  District   and   the   whole   county   remains   in   the   new   Congressional   District   16.    Our   goal   in  this  county  will  be  to  maintain  a  40%  Democratic  performance  in  line  with  Democratic  performance  in  2008.    We  will  reach  out  to  Wooster  College  Democrats  for  campus  or-­‐ganizing,  and  volunteering.    We  won’t  spend  much  time  on  persuasion  in  this  county,  but  will  drop  mail  pieces  and  use  phone  banking  for  name  ID.             74  
  • GOTV  In  October,  the  field  operation  will  begin  the  switch  from  persuasion  to  GOTV.    Largely,  this   will   begin   with   the   October   2nd   mailing   of   absentee   ballots.     A   direct   mail   piece   will  be  sent  out  that  same  day  to  remind  indentified  supporters  who  have  requested  absen-­‐tee  ballots  to  vote  for  Betty  and  to  return  their  ballots.    In  phone  banking  and  canvasses,  field   workers   will   ask   supporters   if   they   have   received   their   ballot,   if   they   have   any  questions  about  it,  if  they  have  mailed  it  back  in.    Absentee  ballots  can  be  mailed  or  hand  delivered  the  county  Board  of  Elections.    They  are  due  by  Election  Day,  but  we  will  make  every   effort   to   get   our   supporters   to   turn   in   their   ballots   early   so   that   we   can   concen-­‐trate   on   Election   Day   voters   by   the   last   week   of   the   campaign.     Information   about   re-­‐questing  and  returning  absentee  ballots  will  be  provided  in  Sutton  mailings  and  in  our  canvass  scripts.    In  early  October,  both  our  phone  and  walking  canvass  will  be  focused  on  absentee  voting.      Our  focus  during  the  GOTV  effort  will  be  contacting  known  supporters,  reminding  them  to   vote,   and   asking   for   help   on   Election   Day,   either   with   our   campaign   or   to   assist   at   the  polls.    The  persuasion  universe  will  still  exist,  but  by  this  point  it  should  be  a  small  num-­‐ber  that  can  be  phoned  during  volunteer  phone  shifts.    Any  supporter  who  tells  the  cam-­‐paign   that   they   want   to   vote   in   person   will   be   walked   through   a   script   that   asks   them   to  plan  their  Election  Day  with  the  volunteer.      The  campaign  has  budgeted  to  send  a  last  persuasion  mailing  in  week  2  for  our  late  de-­‐ciding  persuadable  voters.    Before  election,  personal  endorsement  mailings  will  also  be  sent   out.     These   are   cards   written   by   supporters   to   their   friends   explaining   why   they  support   Betty   Sutton.     Additional   money   has   been   set   aside   for   a   last   minute   50,000  piece  mailing  if  finances  allow.         75  
  • 72  Hour  Push  Our  GOTV  universe  should  be  contacted  at  least  twice.    The  first  contact  should  have  had  the  conversation  about  absentee  voting.    If  voters  return  their  absentee  ballots,  they  will  not   be   contacted   again   by   the   campaign   except   for   volunteer   and   fundraising   solicita-­‐tions.      The  contacts  during  the  72  hour  push  will  be  toward  identified  supporters  only.    We  will  ask  supporters  about  their  voting  plans  when  we  contact  them  on  the  phone  or  during  a  canvass.    If   they   are   not   home,   a   door  hanger  will  be  left  that  alerts  them  to  their  polling  location  and  the  hours  when  the  poll  will  be  open.      Supporters  who  still  have  their  absentee  ballots  in  the  last  72  hours  of  the  campaign  will  be   encouraged   to   take   their   ballot   to   the   polls   on   Election   Day.     If   they   choose   to   vote   in  person   at   their   polling   location   on   Election   Day,   yet   have   received   an   absentee   ballot,  they  will  have  to  vote  a  provisional  ballot.    For  this  reason,  we  will  strongly  encourage  voters  with  the  absentee  ballot  in  their  hand  to  send  it  in,  or  to  take  it  to  the  polling  loca-­‐tion  on  Election  Day.      We  will  canvass  the  weekend  and  weekdays  leading  up  to  Election  Day  in  our  priority  turnout   areas.       The   night   before   each   canvass   walk   packets   for   all   walkable   precincts   in  areas  surrounding  our  two  staging  locations  -­‐  our  Cuyahoga  and  Summit  Offices  -­‐  will  be  cut,  and  placed  in  envelopes  with  door  hangers.    Scripts  will  also  be  included,  which  will  direct  voters  to  their  correct  polling  location.      Canvassers  and  phone  bankers  speaking  with  voters  on  Election  Day  can  offer  rides  to  supporters  who  need  help  getting  to  the  polls.    The  campaign  will  have  approximately  15  volunteers  and  their  vehicles  on  hand  to  give  rides  to  those  in  need.    The  campaign     76  
  • will  try  to  work  with  local  county  party  organizations  to  make  sure  these  rides  are  avail-­‐able  in  the  areas  they  will  be  needed.  The   first   GOTV   canvass   on   Election   Day   will   leave   the   offices   at   5:30am.     Coffee   and  breakfast  will  be  provided  and  Betty  Sutton  will  be  in  the  Cuyahoga  office  to  encourage  volunteers  and  hopefully  to  attend  a  short  canvass.    The  early  morning  canvass  will  only  drop  the  door  hangers  with  the  polling  location  information  on  them.    They  will  not  be  contacting  voters.      The   second   canvass   will   leave   the   staging   locations   at   7am,   and   will   attempt   to   catch  voters  before  they  leave  for  work.    This  canvass  will  be  directed  to  speak  with  the  voters  about  how  and  when  they  are  planning  to  vote.      Walk   packets   will   be   available   throughout   the   day   for   volunteers   who   stop   in   and   ask   to  help.    There  will  also  be  phone  banks  that  will  operate  throughout  the  day  asking  voters  if  they  have  voted  yet,  and  encouraging  them  to  do  so  by  the  close  of  polls.      The   GOTV   canvass   will   contact   the   majority   of   our   supporters,   but   priority   will   be   given  to   voters   who   indicated   support   for   Romney   and   support   for   Sutton   in   our   high   turnout  precincts   in   Cuyahoga   County.       These   targets   are   our   top   priority   because   we   expect  that  Democratic  leaning  voters  who  ID  for  Obama  and  Sutton  will  likely  be  turned  out  by  efforts   from   the   Obama   campaign   or   other   coordinated   Democratic   efforts.     We   will   still  canvass   and   call   these   universes,   but   they   will   be   second   priority   to   other   votes   that   the  campaign  must  turn  out  by  itself  in  order  to  win.                 77  
  • How  We  Get  It  Done  Organizers  in  both  county  offices  will  be  encouraged  to  work  with  supportive  organiza-­‐tions,  coalitions,  unions,  local  universities,  and  past  volunteer  lists  to  begin  recruitment  for  the  tasks  outlined  in  the  field  plan.    In  previous  cycles,  the  Sutton  campaign  has  re-­‐lied  on  volunteers  to  staff  the  field  effort,  and  we  plan  to  continue  to  utilize  volunteers  this  year.    Throughout  the  campaign,  the  field  staff  will  be  expected  to  attend  community  events  to  show  support  for  the  campaign  and  to  recruit  more  volunteers.    Events  such  as  parades,   farmers   markets,   county   fairs,   and   other   large   gatherings   can   eventually   be  tasked   to   volunteers,   but   it   will   be   important   for   the   organizers   to   attend   the   County  Democratic  Party  meetings.      Field   Organizers   will   be   tasked   with   forming   a   Fellowship   Program   that   will   offer   credit  to   high   school   or   college   students   in   exchange   for   a   dedicated   amount   of   time   spent  working  on  the  campaign.    Organizers  will  be  encouraged  to  find  two  students  for  each  of  the  offices.    After  enough  training,  the  students  can  implement  canvasses  and  phone  banks  with  minimal  supervision  of  the  organizer.      The  field  organizers  will  be  responsi-­‐ble  for  supervising  these  canvass  directors,  but  the  goal  is  to  have  canvass  directors  that  can  independently  lead  their  canvass  teams  and  phone  banks.  The   Field   Director   will   work   directly   with   union   leaders   to   secure   a   commitment   of   vol-­‐unteer  hours  on  the  campaign.    Because  of  Sutton’s  work  against  anti-­‐labor  legislation,  we  can  expect  strong  support  from  many  union  activists.      We  will  work  with  key  groups  including  the  Tri-­‐County  Labor  Council,  and  various  locals  within  the  16th  District.      The  organizers   will   be   responsible   for   using   the   time   given   by   the   supportive   unions   effi-­‐ciently.     It   will   be   important   for   the   organizer   to   cut   targeted   canvasses   for   the   union  volunteers  to  walk,  which  are  organized  around  their  work  schedules.         78  
  • It  will  be  the  organizers’  responsibility  to  build  relationships  with  other  supportive  or-­‐ganizations  to  ensure  volunteer  shifts  are  full,  and  that  the  office  is  operating  to  capacity.      In  the  final  week  of  campaigning  all  non-­‐essential,  non-­‐field  staff  will  be  switched  over  to   work   on   field   efforts.       This   will   likely   include   the   scheduler,   finance   staff,   researcher,  and  possibly  our  Communications  Director.      The  following  list  identifies  key  coalition  groups  where  we  can  begin  recruiting  volun-­‐teers   for   our   field   program.       This   is   not   an   exhaustive   list,   so   every   effort   should   be  made  by  the  field  team  to  seek  out  opportunities  for  volunteer  recruitment.    Coalition  Organizations  Cleveland  Stonewall  Democrats  Cleveland  Building  &  Construction  Trades  Council  C.O.P.E.  Cuyahoga  County  Democratic  Party    Medina  County  Democratic  Party  Portage  County  Democratic  Party    Stark  County  Democratic  Party  Summit  County  Democratic  Party  Wayne  County  Democratic  Party  North  Shore  AFL-­‐CIO  Teamsters  Ohio  D.R.I.V.E.    (Democrat,  Republican,  Independent,  Voter  Education)  Tri-­‐County  Regional  Labor  Council,  AFL-­‐CIO    Wooster  College  Democrats     79  
  •  Kent  State  College  Democrats  Oberlin  College  Democrats  United  Labor  Agency:  Parma  Coalition  Of  Labor  Union  Women  (Cluw)  -­‐Northeast  Tri-­‐County  Hall  Of  Fame  Central  Labor  Council:  Canton  The  Ohio  State  Association  Of  Plumbers  &  Pipefitters:  Akron  North  East  Area  Labor  Federation:  Canton  Women’s  Democratic  Clubs                         80  
  • Communications 11Earned  Media  Strategy  I t  can  be  safely  assumed  that  paid  media  will  become  very  expensive  because   Ohio  will  be  a  battleground  state  with  large  amounts  of  outside  money  buying  up   advertising   and   driving   up   prices.     During   this   cycle   Ohio   will   have   Congressional  elections,  a  U.S.    Senate  election,  and  the  hotly  contested  Presidential  election,  which  will  draw  a  great  deal  of  news  media  to  the  area  resulting  in  a  large  amount  of  earned  media  opportunities.    However,  this  campaign  should  never  assume  that  the  media  will  come  to  them.    Other  headline-­‐worthy  events,  both  inside  and  outside  of  politics,  could  steal  the  spotlight.    Thus  it  is  the  campaign’s  responsibility  to  create  earned  media  opportuni-­‐ties  and  invite  the  press.  In   order   to   attract   local   and   national   news,   the   campaign’s   communications   department  needs  to  have  press  releases  prepared  and  sent  to  all  of  the  local  media  outlets  and  blogs  for  every  planned  event.    Furthermore,  the  communications  department  needs  to  keep  an   eye   on   the   floor   of   the   House.     Due   to   both   candidates   being   incumbents,   it   is   im-­‐portant  to  watch  for  key  votes  that  could  be  used  against  our  opposition.    Understanding  legislative  action  is  also  important  to  prepare  Betty  Sutton  for  any  questions  regarding  recent  Congressional  activity.  Issue  statements  will  be  developed  and  targeted  policy  updates  should  be  sent  to  both  national  and  niche  blogs  pertaining  to  those  issues.    New  Media  such  as  Facebook  and     81  
  • Twitter   should   be   used   to   bring   attention   to   the   campaign’s   press   releases   and   issue  statements.  Sample  Opportunities  for  Earned  Media   Event   When/Where   Volunteer/Candidate  Medina  County  Memorial   May  28  at  10  a.m.      begin-­‐ Candidate  Day  Parade   ning  from  the  Old  Court-­‐ house  on  Broadway  and   Washington  Independence  Day  Fire-­‐ July  3rd  Press  event  at   Candidate  works  (Speech/Press  event   8:00pm  Fireworks  begin  at  beforehand)   9:45  pm  Medina  High   School  Wooster  Lion’s  Club  Meet-­‐ July  5  at  6:30pm-­‐8:00  at   Candidate  ing   Ryan’s  Grill,  Buffet  &  Bak-­‐ ery  70 th  Annual  Strongsville   July  21  at  Strongsville   Volunteers  Homecoming   Commons,  located  at  the   corner  of  Rt.    42  (Pearl   Road)  and  Rt.    82  (Royalton   Road)  Johnny  Appleseed  Festival   July  27   Candidate  and  Parade  Summit  County  Fair   July  28  in  Tallmadge   Candidate  Medina  County  Fair   July  30  (afternoon)  in  Me-­‐ Candidate   dina  Cuyahoga  County  Fair   Aug.    6  in  the  Berea  Fair-­‐ Candidate   ground  Portage  County  Fair   Aug  21  in  Randolph  Fair-­‐ Volunteers   ground  Stark  County  Fair   Aug  28  in  Canton   Volunteers  Wayne  County  Fair   Sept.    8  in  Wooster  Fair-­‐ Volunteers   ground  Tour  of  Manufacturing   Sept.    24   Candidate  Plant           82  
  • Memorial  Day  –  Memorial  Day  is  a  great  opportunity  for  earned  media  in  the  campaign  to   highlight   Sutton’s   upbringing   and   the   service   of   her   father   in   World   War   II.     The   cam-­‐paign  should  utilize  this  opportunity  as  a  press  event  by  attending  the  parade  and  ser-­‐vice.     Sutton   can   also   use   the   holiday   as   an   opportunity   to   visit   a   local   VA   hospital   to  meet  with  service  members.  Newsletters  –  Newsletters  and  email  alerts  that  will  be  sent  out  to  campaign  supporters  should  also  be  sent  to  media  outlets  and  blogs.    Early  in  the  campaign,  these  should  be  sent  out  on  a  monthly  basis,  but  the  pace  of  these  messages  should  be  increased  as  Elec-­‐tion  Day  becomes  closer.    Newsletters  should  have  a  section  including  the  following:  any  upcoming   television   appearances,   upcoming   events   (both   fundraising   and   meet   and  greet  events).      College   Fellowship   –   The   Sutton   Campaign   will   offer   four   College   Fellowships   to   local  college  students  that  are  interested  in  gaining  hands  on  experience  in  campaigning.    The  fellows  will  be  primarily  involved  in  finding,  scheduling,  and  organizing  volunteers  as  a  part   of   the   Field   operation   (See   Field   Plan).     The   announcement   of   this   opportunity   also  serves  as  a  press  event  and  each  member  of  the  College  Fellowship  will  write  up  a  press  release   which   will   be   sent   out   to   their   local   newspapers   regarding   their   acceptance   into  the  program.      Meet  and  Greets  with  Ohio  Voters  –  Meet  and  Greets  are  a  very  important  tool  to  use  in  the   Sutton   campaign.     This   includes   attending   public   events   such   as   County   Fairs   and  local   club   meetings.     By   allowing   for   several   of   these   events,  voters   feel   more   connected  to  Betty  Sutton.    They  also  offer  excellent  photo  opportunities.  Tours  –  Touring  different  locations  around  the  district  serves  as  both  a  meet  and  greet  event  but  also  allows  for  the  candidate  to  connect  with  voters  attending  the  event  and     83  
  • reading   the   ensuing   news   stories.     For   example,   visiting   manufacturing   facilities   offers  the  opportunity  to  talk  about  jobs  and  the  economy  and  offers  a  photo  opportunity  for  the  press.    The  Sutton  campaign  will  strive  to  have  the  candidate  tour  various  manufac-­‐turing  plants,  VA  hospitals  and  Senior  Centers  around  the  district.    These  types  of  tours  are   strategic   because   health   care   and   jobs   will   likely   be   the   two   biggest   issues   in   the  campaign.    Considering  that  Renacci  has  not  toured  many  of  the  manufacturing  plants  in  the  new  16th  district,  it  provides  Sutton  with  an  advantage  that  the  campaign  must  uti-­‐lize.     News   outlets   will   be   issued   a   press   release   and   schedule   approximately   two   weeks  prior  to  a  tour  event.  Debates  –  The  Sutton  campaign  will  work  with  local  networks  to  encourage  their  spon-­‐sorship  of  a   series   of   Congressional  debates   that   will   air   in   the   Cleveland   media   market.    Betty   Sutton   will   attempt   to   secure   as   many   debates   as   possible   because   she   has  strengths  that  a  debate  environment  will  emphasize.    On  the  other  hand,  Renacci  is  not  as  strong  on  camera  as  Sutton.    Debates  also  provide  a  good  way  to  reach  out  to  voters  in  areas  that  are  not  targeted  by  canvassing,  and  other  GOTV  efforts,  for  example  the  Dem-­‐ocrats  in  highly  Republican  areas  of  Wayne  County.  Letters  to  the  Editor  –  The  campaign  should  attempt  to  have  the  candidate,  senior  staff,  and   enthusiastic   supporters   write   letters   to   the   editor   each   week   for   local,   regional,   and  if  appropriate,  national  newspapers.    The  Communications  Director  will  be  in  charge  of  coordinating  this  effort.      Rallies  –  Holding  rallies  to  excite  the  Democratic  base  and  recruit  volunteers  is  a  good  way  to  gain  some  national  and  local  earned  media.    Sutton  conducts  herself  well  in  front  of   crowds   and   she   should   utilize   this   strength   to   its   full   potential.     Press   releases   should  be  sent  by  the  Communications  Director  to  various  media  outlets  including  radio,  televi-­‐   84  
  • sion,  and  online  approximately  two  weeks  in  advance  of  a  rally.    The  campaign  should  consider   requesting   RSVPs   for   media   that   wish   to   sit   in   the   media   section   at   the   front   of  the  rally.    This  will  help  judge  media  presence  in  advance  of  the  event,  which  will  mini-­‐mize  unnecessary  effort  to  get  out  the  media.                                                 85  
  • Ohio  Congressional  District  16  Media  List    TV  -­‐  Cleveland  Market  ABC  -­‐  WES  (Ch.5)  CBS  -­‐  WOIO  (Ch.    19)  FOX  -­‐  WSYX  (Ch.    28)  NBC  -­‐  WKYC  (Ch.    3)  PBS  -­‐  WVIZ  (Ch.    25)  CW  -­‐  WBNX  (Ch.    55)  My  Network  TV  -­‐  WUAB  (Ch.    43)    Radio  Stations  Cleveland  1100  AM  WTAM    News  Radio    930    AM  WEOL  The  News  Station    90.3  AM  WCPN  Public  Radio  Akron:  640  AM  WHLO  Akrons  News  Talk  1590  AM  WAKR  Akron’s  News  Authority  Canton:  1480  AM  WHBC    Newspaper  The  Blade  (Toledo,  OH)  The  Columbus  Dispatch  Akron  Beacon  Journal  The  Plain  Dealer  (Cleveland)  The  Sun  News  (Weekly  local  paper)’     86  
  • Medina  County  Gazette  Wooster  Record(city)  North  Canton  Sun  Journal  Wooster  Voice(Wooster  College)  Kent  Starter(  Kent  State  University)    Blog/Internet    Local  Cleveland.com  toledoBlade.com  -­‐  staff  writer  Tony  Cook  Morningjournal.com  (Lorain,  OH)    National  Emily’s  list  blog  Daily  Kos  Leftyblog       Paid  Media  Paid  media  will  by  far  be  the  largest  expenditure  of  the  campaign.      CD  16  is  entirely  in  the   Cleveland-­‐Akron   media   market,   which   is   the   18th   largest   media   market   in   the   coun-­‐try.      It  is  also  an  extremely  expensive  market,  which  will  affect  how  the  campaign  can  use  media  to  reach  persuadable  voters.      Because  television  is  so  expensive,  the  Sutton  campaign  will  only  be  able  to  be  on  air  for  a  few  weeks.      In  order  to  effectively  reach  our  targeted   persuadable   voters   the   campaign   will   need   to   utilize   radio   and   online   advertis-­‐ing.     87  
  • Our  message  to  persuadable  voters  will  be  consistent  across  all  our  advertising  media.      As  laid  out  in  the  section  on  Messaging  and  Strategy  our  campaign’s  overall  focus  will  be  on   jobs,   the   economy,   and   the   central   message   of   building   a   better   Ohio.       Our   polling  research  will  also  guide  campaign  messages,  including  our  online  messaging  which  can  be  micro-­‐targeted  to  smaller  voter  universes.      As  outlined  in  the  Polling  section,  we  will  use  our  benchmark  poll  to  guide  our  initial  messaging  strategy  and  our  brushfire  track-­‐ing  polls  will  be  deployed  to  help  track  the  effect  of  our  major  media  buys.        As   described   in   the   Political   Environment   overview,   it   will   be   difficult   for   the   Sutton  campaign   to   break   through   the   clutter   of   the   presidential   and   Senate   races   that   will   also  be  playing  out  in  Ohio.    Part  of  the  overall  media  strategy  must  include  a  plan  to  reserve  our   air   time   early.     Early   buying   is   necessary   because   buys   from   presidential   candidates  and  Senate  candidates  will  likely  soak  up  a  large  portion  of  the  available  media.    The  Sut-­‐ton  campaign  should  plan  to  reserve  the  air  time  as  early  as  July.        Since  this  is  a  Federal  race,  television  stations  are  required  to  set  aside  a  portion  of  the  air  time  for  candidates.      If  we  request  our  planned  time  early,  we  should  be  able  to  raise  the   money   to   pay   for   the   time   and   the   ad   production   by   the   end   of   September.       In   addi-­‐tion   to   reserving   our   air   time   early,   we   will   need   to   produce   creative   ads   that   break  through  the  clutter  of  other  political  advertising  on  the  Ohio  airwaves.      Because  of  this,  we  have  budgeted  for  slightly  higher  than  average  production  costs  on  the  few  ads  we  will  be  able  to  run.                   88  
  • Television  Buy  CD   16   is   covered   entirely   by   the   Cleveland-­‐Akron   media   market,   which   simplifies   the  Sutton  campaign’s  television  media  strategy.      Since  the  campaign  will  only  need  to  make  a  buy  in  one  market,  our  strategic  decisions  will  center  around  when  to  go  up  on  the  air.      As   stated   above,   the   Cleveland-­‐Akron   market   is   one   of   the   largest   and   most   expensive  markets   in  the  country,  and  our  campaign  resources  will  only  be  able  to  buy  a  limited  amount  of  air  time.      We   project   that   the   campaign   will   be   able   to   go   up   with   600   points   on   broadcast   and  cable   four   weeks   before   the   election   and   stay   up   through   Election   Day.     The   buys   for  weeks  2,  3,  and  4  (before  election  day)  will  all  be  at  600  points  on  broadcast  and  cable.    For  week  1  we  will  increase  our  broadcast  buy  to  800  points  to  drive  home  our  message  for  late  deciding  persuadable  voters.    This  increase  is  also  designed  to  encourage  base  voters   to   turnout.       In   addition   to   the   core   media   buy,   we   have   created   a   contingency  media  budget  that  increases  our  buy  for  both  broadcast  and  cable  in  weeks  1  and  2  by  200  points.    We  believe  that  we  can  win  with  the  core  media  buy,  but  an  additional  buy  would  be  ideal  if  fundraising  permits.  We   have   based   our   television   costs   on   the   suggested   average   distribution   of   the   buy  over   various   times   of   day.     We   are   expecting   our   buys   will   include   15   percent   early  morning,   5   percent   daytime,   5   percent   early   fringe,   20   percent   early   news,   15   percent  prime  access,  20  percent  primetime,  15  percent  late  news  and  5  percent  late  fringe.             89  
  • Radio  Buy  Since   the   Cleveland-­‐Akron   TV   market   is   so   expensive,   radio   advertising   will   be   a   signifi-­‐cant  portion  of  our  messaging  to  voters.    There  are  three  metro  radio  areas  that  cover  CD  16,  and  our  radio  buys  will  be  timed  to  roll  out  in  our  priority  geographic  targeted  areas  by  week  6,  and  in  second  tier  geographic  targets  in  week  5.  For   our   top   two   persuasion   targets,   Cuyahoga   County   and   Medina   County,   the   campaign  will  make  a  radio  buy  for  the  final  6  weeks,  and  steadily  increase  the  number  of  spots  purchased  in  the  final  4  weeks  before  Election  Day.      Our  ads  in  this  radio  market  will  target  commuters  who  live  in  CD  16,  but  work  in  the  city  of  Cleveland.      CD  16  contains  the  outlying  suburbs  of  Cleveland  in  Cuyahoga  County,  and  we  expect  to  win  most  of  our  support  in  these  precincts.        For   our   second   tier   persuasion   targets,   we   will   make   radio   buys   in   the   Akron   Metro   and  Canton  Metro  radio  markets,  which  will  reach  persuadable  voters  in  our  target  areas  of  Portage  County,  Summit  County  and  Medina  County.      These  buys  will  overlap  with  our  lowest   priority   areas   in   Stark   County   and   Wayne   County.       Our   buy   in   the   Akron   market  will   start   in   week   5   and   steadily   increase   through   week   1.       The   buy   in   the   Canton   radio  market  will  also  begin  in  week  5  and  increase  through  week  1.      However,  because  the  Canton   buy   will   cover   our   lower   priority   geographic   targets,   we   will   be   purchasing   few-­‐er   spots   in   this   market   area   overall   in   order   to   keep   our   resources   focused   on   the   top  priority  persuasion  targets.  We   have   based   our   radio   costs   on   the   suggested   average   distribution   of   the   buy   over  various   times   of   day.     We   are   expecting   our   buys   will   include   60   percent   during   AM  drive,  15  percent  midday,  and  35  percent  during  PM  drive.       90  
  • Online  Advertising  Much   like   our   radio   advertising   strategy,   our   online   advertising   is   intended   to   supple-­‐ment  our  television  buys.    In  addition  to  being  cheaper,  the  advantage  of  online  advertis-­‐ing  is  that  we  can  target  demographically  as  well  as  geographically.    Though  the  message  and   ad   copy   for   each   of   these   online  formats  will  vary  depending  on  the  target  universe,  we   plan   to   use   online   advertising   for   both   persuasion   and   GOTV.       Like   our   radio   buy,  our  online  advertising  will  be  rolled  out  in  different  phases.      Our  online  advertising  push  will  begin  in  September  with  search  ads,  which  will  contin-­‐ue  through  Election  Day.      These  are  among  our  lowest  cost  online  ads,  and  we  will  be  rolling  them  out  earlier  than  other  online  advertising  because  we  can  sustain  them  for  longer  at  a  lower  cost.      Additionally,  we  can  define  the  key  search  terms  for  our  ads  to  appear  on  during  a  time  when  voters  may  start  to  tune  into  the  race  and  begin  looking  for  information  online.      Search  terms  to  consider  are  “Betty  Sutton,”  and  “Jim  Renacci,”  as  well  as  other  terms  that  may  be  related  to  the  district  and  the  race.      We  have  budget-­‐ed   to   begin   the   search   ad   push   with   100,000   impressions   per   week,   increasing   all   the  way  up  to  500,000  impressions  per  week  in  the  final  week  before  Election  Day.  Beginning   in   the   last   week   of   September,   we   will   expand   our   online   advertising   to   ad  networks.      This  advertising  can  be  targeted  very  precisely  to  our  key  persuadable  uni-­‐verses  identified  in  our  polling  and  field  ID  calls.      Although  our  research  will  drive  our  targets,  an  example  of  a  universe  that  could  be  reached  through  ad  network  online  ad-­‐vertising   is   the   important   demographic   of   Independent   women   voters.       Using   the   ad  networks,  we  can  target  a  specific  message  to  websites  that  are  frequented  by  voters  in  our   district   that   fit   within   each   target   demographic.     We   will   roll   out   an   initial   ad   net-­‐work  buy  for  100,000  impressions  per  week  in  week  6,  and  continue  to  build  that  buy  to  500,000  impressions  per  week  by  week  1.     91  
  • In   the   last   month   of   the   campaign,   we   will   roll   out   online   advertising   on   social   networks  and  local  media  websites.      Our  field  outreach  and  tracking  polls  will  help  to  guide  the  content  for  these  advertisements.      We  plan  to  use  these  venues  for  both  persuasion  and  GOTV   advertising.     We   will   use   our   tracking   and   field   data   to   find   key   undecided   uni-­‐verses  for  final  persuasion  opportunities.    Online  ads  will  be  focused  during  the  final  two  week  period  on  GOTV  advertisements.    In  addition  to  similar  messages  across  the  other  online  advertising  and  our  TV  and  radio  buys,  we  will  be  using  our  ads  in  the  final  weeks  to  increase  visibility  for  Betty  Sutton  going  into  Election  Day.        In  our  Strategic  Assumptions,  we  outlined  the  impact  the  presidential  race  could  have  on  this  congressional  election.      It  is  very  likely  that  we  will  be  able  to  pick  up  some  split  ticket  voters  who  cast  ballots  for  Romney  and  Sutton.      It  will  be  essential  to  keep  Betty  on  our  target  voters’  mind  going  into  Election  Day  to  ensure  that  they  vote  for  her  down  the  ballot,  regardless  of  who  they  select  in  other  races.  One   final   consideration   for   the   paid   media   plan   is   outside   spending   on   television   or   oth-­‐er  advertising  in  our  race.    We  know  that  this  race  is  a  primary  target  for  both  the  NRCC  and   the   DCCC   and   we   should   anticipate   that   they   will   both   advertise   in   this   race.     We  cannot  know  whether  this  will  occur,  or  when  it  will  occur.    But,  if  it  does,  we  can  expect  to  have  to  field  questions  about  ads.    Since  we  will  not  know  anything  about  the  ads,  the  campaigns  response  is  simple.    But  volunteers  and  staff  will  need  to  be  prepped  to  an-­‐swer  that  they  are  not  the  campaigns  ads  and  that  we  do  not  know  anything  about  them.  **For  sample  TV  Ads  scripts  see  Appendix  J  &  K     92  
  •   93  
  •   94  
  • Finance 12Introduction  T he  Ohio  16th  2012  House  race  is  expected  to  be  extremely  expensive  as  both   the  Republican  and  Democratic  candidates  are  incumbent  members  of  Con-­‐gress.    A  Renacci  victory  would  eliminate  a  Democratic  seat  in  the  House  increasing  the  strength  of  the  Republican  hold  on  that  chamber,  while  a  Sutton  victory  would  bring  be  a  step  towards  renewed  Democratic  control  of  the  House.    This  makes  the  16th  district  important   to   both   Republican   and   Democratic   electoral   aspirations.     Early   polls   show  Sutton  and  Renacci  nearly  tied.    With  neither  candidate  having  a  safe  majority,  it  is  likely  that  significant  amounts  of  outside  money  will  flow  into  this  race.        2012  Cycle  Before  developing  a  fundraising  plan,  we  decided  to  examine  both  Sutton  and  Renacci’s  fundraising   activities.     This   would   give   us   a   better   idea   of   how   much   money   would   be  needed  to  give  Sutton’s  message  equal  exposure  and  also  how  much  money  could  realis-­‐tically  be  raised.      Based   on   Federal   Election   Commission   (FEC)   filings,   Betty   Sutton   has   been   receiving  contributions  at  over  double  the  rate  that  she  received  them  during  the  2010  and  2008  election   cycles.     Renacci’s   fundraising   has   also   grown,   but   his   contributions   have   only  increased  by  approximately  60%  when  compared  to  the  2010  election  cycle  (see  graphs  below).         95  
  •     Average  Contributions  Per  Day*     Days  to  the  General  Elec-­‐ 2012   2010   2008   Average   tion   Rate  of  In-­‐ crease  500   Sutton   $2,112   $1,816   $743   64.4%     Renacci   $3,864       -­‐  300   Sutton   $2,235   $1,122   $811   112%     Renacci   $2,480   1,600.69     54.9%  200   Sutton   $7,826   $3,565   $2,927   127%     Renacci   $5,868   $3,566     64.6%  Average   Sutton         101.5%     Renacci         59.7%  * Source: FEC FilingsThe  chart  above  shows  that  while  Renacci  held  a  fundraising  advantage  during  the  be-­‐ginning  of  the  election  cycle,  Sutton’s  fundraising  has  since  surpassed  the  Renacci  cam-­‐paign.     The   2010   election   cycle   seems   to   show   a   similar   pattern   with   Renacci’s   fundrais-­‐ing   surging   early,   while   Sutton   raised   the   most   money   between   the   primary   and   the  general  election.                               96  
  •   Renacci                           97  
  •   Sutton       Looking   forward,  one   can  deter-­‐ mine  the   approximate   dollar   amount  that   each  cam-­‐ paign  will  be     98  
  • capable  of  raising  by  applying  the  average  fundraising  increases  calculated  above  to  the  dollar  amounts  raised  in  the  previous  election  cycle.    Therefore,  if  both  campaigns  con-­‐tinue  to  raise  money  at  their  current  rates,  one  would  expect  them  to  raise  the  following  amounts  over  the  coming  months.    It   must   be   noted   that   the   projections   in   the   chart   above   begin   in   April   2012   since   the  campaigns’  last  FEC  filings  covered  the  period  ending  March  31.    In  addition,  these  pro-­‐jections   do   not   reflect   over   $600,000   of   personal   loans   extended   by   Jim   Renacci   to   his  own  campaign  from  April  to  October  2010.       As   previously   men-­‐ tioned,   these   projec-­‐ tions   were   based   off   of   both   candidates’   fundraising   perfor-­‐ mance   in   past   elec-­‐ tions.     The   chart   above   reflects   the   early  peak  in  Renacci  fundraising   seen   in   2010   as   well   as   the   late   peak   demonstrated   by   the   Sutton   campaign.    Naturally,  each  election  is  unique,  but  when  compared  to  fundraising  in  the  current  cy-­‐cle,  previous  elections  provide  a  foundation  of  data  on  which  to  base  an  approximation  for  the  remaining  months.         99  
  • In   total,   we   expect   that   between   April   and   November   2012,   the   Sutton   campaign   will   be  able  to  raise  approximately  $2.5  million,  while  the  Renacci  campaign  will  raise  approxi-­‐mately   $1.8   million.     The   early   peak   in   Renacci   fundraising   has   resulted   in   a   superior  cash   position,   which,   as   of   March   31,   2012,   amounted   to   $1.23   million.     At   that   time,   the  Sutton   campaign   had   $784,000   in   cash.     Therefore,   the   Renacci   campaign   will   be   able   to  spend   a   total   of   approximately   $3.3   million,   while   the   Sutton   campaign   will   be   able   to  spend  a  total  of  approximately  $3.28  million.      Neither   side   appears   to   have   an   overwhelming   fundraising   advantage.     However,   Re-­‐nacci  is  wealthy  and  has  been  willing  to  loan  his  campaign  significant  sums  of  money  in  the  past.    This  is  a  fundraising  wild  card  and  could  have  a  significant  impact  on  the  levels  of  funding  available  to  his  campaign.    A  close  race  could  result  in  a  personal  capital  injec-­‐tion  in  excess  of  $500,000,  which  would  be  difficult  for  the  Sutton  campaign  to  match.    However,  this   could   open   the   doors   to   increased   direct   campaign   donations   from   politi-­‐cal   parties   and   their   affiliates,   such   as   the   Democratic   Congressional   Campaign   Commit-­‐tee.        Historical  Fundraising  Breakdown   Based   on   FEC   filings,   it   ap-­‐ pears   as   though   both   candi-­‐ dates   are   equally   dependent   on   committees,   such   as   PACs   for   funding.     Both   campaigns   receive   approximately   50%   of   their   funding   from   commit-­‐   100  
  • tees.     The   remaining   50%   of   funding   comes   almost   entirely   from   individual   donations.    Of   these   individual   donors,   Sutton   has   a   more   diversified   donor   base,   while   Renacci   is  more  reliant  on  large  donors  that  give  above  $200  each.    This  is  a  potential  strength  for  Sutton   since   her   small   donors   have   not   yet   maxed   out   and   may   be   willing   to   make   addi-­‐tional  donations  as  the  campaign  moves  forward.    Part  of  the  Sutton  strategy  (detailed  below)  will  be  to  contact  smaller  donors  and  increase  their  involvement  with  the  cam-­‐paign  through  volunteering  and  additional  donations.     In   addition,   small   donors   only   make   up   approximately   17%   of   Suttons   total   individual   do-­‐ nations.     With  exposure  to  res-­‐ idents   in   both   the   new   16th   district   and   the   old   13th   dis-­‐ trict,   it   may   be   possible   for   Sutton   to   take   advantage   of  those  connections  built  over  the  past  6  years  to  raise  more  small  donations.        Fundraising  Goals  After  assessing  both  campaigns’  fundraising  efforts,  we  believe  that  it  will  be  important  for  Sutton  to  match  Renacci’s  effort  to  ensure  that  her  message  receives  equal  or  better  exposure.    It  is  also  important  to  ensure  that  money  is  available  to  respond  to  a  potential  Renacci  capital  injection  in  the  last  few  weeks  of  the  election.    For  the  remaining  months  of  the  election,  the  goal  is  to  raise  an  additional  $2.6  million.    If  this  goal  is  met,  it  will  bring  the  total  funds  available  for  the  Sutton  campaign  to  spend  to  $3.4  million.    This  is     101  
  • approximately  $100,000  or  approximately  5%  above  the  receipts  projected  using  histor-­‐ical   campaign   performance   shown   above.     These   additional   funds   will   be   raised   in   small  amounts   from   grass   roots   donors,   which   is   an   area   where   we   believe   that   the   Sutton  campaign  can  improve  performance.    Given  the  Renacci  campaign’s  fundraising  thus  far,  as  well  as  the  amounts  spent  by  both  Sutton  and  Renacci  in  2010,  the  total  $3.4  million  of  available  funds  should  be  sufficient  to  offer  Sutton  the  best  possible  chance  for  victo-­‐ry.              Fundraising  Plan  The  Sutton  fundraising  plan  is  broken  into  three  sections:  funds  raised  from  committees  (PACs,   unions,   etc.),   funds   raised   from   small   individual   donors,   and   funds   raised   from  large  individual  donors.  For  additional  details,  see  the  fundraising  plan  at  the  end  of  this  section.    Committees  So  far  in  the  campaign,  Sutton  has  received  strong  committee  contributions,  which  are  running  significantly  above  2010  levels.    We  expect  approximately  52%  of  the  additional  funds   raised   by   the   Sutton   campaign   to   be   from   committees.     In   addition   to   receiving  support   from   PACs,   labor   unions,   the   Democratic   Party   and   other   committee   sources,  additional  money  will  be  raised  through  two  finance  committees.    The  first  of  these  will  be   the   official   Sutton   for   Congress   finance   committee.     The   finance   committee   will   be  composed  of  over  a  dozen  local  business  leaders  who  will  use  their  connections  and  in-­‐fluence   to   help   raise   an   additional   $200,000   over   the   course   of   the   campaign.     The   se-­‐cond   committee   will   be   a   caucus   committee   composed   of   several   of   Sutton’s   congres-­‐sional  friends  who  will  help  raise  an  additional  $75,000  over  the  course  of  the  campaign.           102  
  • Small  Donors  Strategy   for   small   individual   small   donors   revolves   around   events,   a   direct   mail   cam-­‐paign,   and   internet   fundraising.     In   total,   small   donors   will   account   for   approximately  10%   of   the   additional   money   raised   by   the   Sutton   campaign.     Raising   money   from   small  donors  requires  significantly  more  work  and  expense  than  raising  funds  from  PACs  and  large  donors.    However,  there  are  important  benefits  to  a  broad  small  donor  base.      Small  donors  are  people  that  the  campaign  can  approach  later  in  the  campaign  to  raise  additional  funds.    Additionally,  while  they  may  not  be  able  to  donate  thousands  of  dol-­‐lars,  the  names  gathered  in  small  donor  fundraising  efforts  will  be  an  important  source  for  volunteer  recruiting.    While  fundraising  efforts,  such  as  direct  mailing  and  small  do-­‐nor  events  may  have  lower  margins  than  similar  campaigns  carried  out  with  large  do-­‐nors,  they  serve  to  spread  the  campaign’s  message  over  a  wider  base  of  potential  voters.    This  secondary  messaging  effect  is  important  when  considering  the  costs  of  small  donor  events.        In  total  27  small  donor  events  will  be  held  over  the  remainder  of  the  campaign.    Exam-­‐ples  of  these  types  of  events  are  included  in  Appendix  F.    These  events  are  expected  to  raise   an   average   of   $5,000   each.     Naturally,   larger   events,   such   as   those   with   Rotary  clubs  or  veterans  groups  will  likely  raise  more  money,  while  smaller  events  will  be  less  lucrative.    To  minimize  costs,  the  campaign  aims  to  have  each  event  sponsored  by  local  organizations,  small  businesses  (unincorporated),  or  individual  citizens.      A  mailing  campaign  will  also  be  conducted.    A  total  of  45,000  pieces  of  mail  will  be  sent  out   during   the   remainder   of   the   campaign.     In   the   fundraising   plan,   it   is   assumed   that  each  mailing  piece  will  cost  $0.51  and  there  will  be  a  return  rate  of  3%.    As  Sutton  nar-­‐rows   down   the   mailing   list   to   those   most   dedicated   to   the   campaign   and   election   day     103  
  • nears,  we  expect  the  average  contribution  to  increase  modestly.     It  is  estimated  that  the  average  contribution  rate  for  the  first  mailing  will  be  $17.00,  the  second  mailing  will  be  $20.00  and  the  third  will  be  $22.00.      Internet  fundraising  will  revolve  around  the  campaign  website  and  internet  advertising  with   in-­‐house   e-­‐mailing   to   supporters.     The   candidate   website   will   have   a   link   to   donate  by   credit   card   and   all   online   advertisements   will   have   a   donor   link.     In   addition,   all   cam-­‐paign  literature  will  include  the  campaign  website  helping  to  increase  traffic.        Large  Individual  Donors  The  strategy  for  large  individual  donors  revolves  around  events,  candidate  call  time,  and  a   specialized   mailing   program.     In   total,   approximately   40%   of   the   additional   funds  raised  by  the  Sutton  campaign  will  be  from  large  individual  donors.      Candidate   call   time   will   be   a   key   component   to   this   strategy.     Congresswoman   Sutton  will   use   call   time   to   contact   previous   high   level   donors   as   well   as   potential   high   level  donors  identified  by  the  campaign  and,  potentially,  the  Democratic  Party.    Calls  to  large  individual   donors   will   not   be   limited   to   people   living   within   the   district,   but   will   also  include  known  democratic  activists  in  other  parts  of  Ohio  and  the  country.    Four  hours  per  day  will  be  dedicated  to  call  time  five  days  per  week.    However,  as  the  election  ap-­‐proaches,   call   time   will   decline   to   two   hours   per   day   freeing   up   Sutton’s   time   to   concen-­‐trate  on  campaign  events.      In  addition,  special  personalized  solicitations  will  be  sent  by  mail  to  former  contributors  that   donated   above   $100,   but   less   than   $500.     There   are   far   too   many   of   these   mid-­‐level  contributors   for   Congresswoman   Sutton   to   call   them   individually,   but   a   personalized  solicitation   may   increase   the   donations   that   the   campaign   is   able   to   draw   from   these     104  
  • donors.    The  fundraising  goals  assume  a  3%  response  rate  for  these  mailings  and  a  $50  average  donation.      Large   donor   events   will   be   another   important   source   of   revenue.     A   total   of   20   large   do-­‐nor  events  will  be  held  over  the  course  of  the  coming  months.    Events  are  expected  to  raise  an  average  of  $16,000  each.    Suggested   donations   for   these   events   will   range   from  $500  to  $2500.       105  
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  • Budget 13Budget  Summary    B ased  on  receipts  so  far  in  the  campaign,  we  believe  that  Sutton  will  be  able  to   raise  the  full  amount  in  the  budget  (see  finance  section  for  details).    However,  in  the  event  that  fundraising  falls  short  of  expectations,  lower  priority  items  have  been  colored   in   red   and   may   be   excluded   from   final   expenditures.     These   items   amount   to  approximately  7.5%  of  the  total  budget.    For  example,  we  believe  that  Betty  Sutton  will  be  able  to  win  the  election  with  an  800pt  media  buy  during  the  run  up  to  the  election,  but  enough  money  was  included  in  the  budget  to  buy  up  to  1,000pts.    The  marginal  re-­‐turn   on   this   additional   200pts   of   media   is   lower,   but   the   higher   buy   would   still   help  reach  additional  voters.      The   overall   budget   is   broken   into   five   sections.     Staff   salaries   are   divided   between   these  five  areas  depending  on  the  function  of  the  staff  member:      Administrative  Expenses  Administrative  expenses  make  up  approximately  9%  of  total  expenditures  and  include  rent,   utility   expenses,   office   supplies,   and   website   expenses.     Administrative   staff   in-­‐cludes  the  Campaign  Manager  and  the  campaign  scheduler.               108  
  • Office  Space:  The   campaign   headquarters   will   be   located   in   Summit   County   where   Congresswoman  Sutton   lives.     The   headquarters   will   have   a   total   of   4500   square   feet,   which   will   be  enough   room   for   key   campaign   staff,   the   candidate,   and   a   volunteers   room   complete  with  10  phone  lines  for  phone  banking  and  5  computers  for  data  entry  and  other  tasks.    The   Cuyahoga   County   office   will   have   a   similar   arrangement   for   volunteers,   but   will  have   less   space   for   paid   campaign   staff   as   most   of   those   positions   will   be   at   the   head-­‐quarters.    Therefore,  this  office  will  be  smaller  at  approximately  3,500  square  feet.    Finance  Expenses  Finance  expenses  amount  to  approximately  7%  of  the  total  budget  and  include  average  event  costs,  the  cost  of  mailed  solicitations  and  finance  staff  salaries.    Research  Expenses  Research  expenses  make  up  approximately  6%  of  the  budget  and  include  polling  costs,  an  outsourced  self-­‐research  book,  a  voter  file  database,  and  a  full  time  researcher.    Media  Expenses  Media  expenses  are  the  vast  majority  of  campaign  expenditures  amounting  to  approxi-­‐mately  67%  of  the  total  budget.    These  include  television,  radio,  and  online  advertising  expenditures  as  well  as  motivational  and  persuasion  mailing  expenses.    The  campaign  has  also  budgeted  for  a  full  time  communications  director.               109  
  • Voter  Outreach  Expenses  Voter  outreach  expenses  make  up  approximately  11%  of  the  budget  and  includes  field  operations  and  the  GOTV  effort.    Included  in  this  section  is  the  cost  of  door  hangers,  yard  signs  and  other  chum  for  volunteer  efforts.         110  
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  • Scheduling 14Scheduling  the  Candidate    C ongresswoman  Sutton  will  be  scheduled  during  the  campaign  in  relation  to  the   following  broad  categories.    The  campaign  will  make  time  allotment  assumptions  based  on  campaign  priorities  (ex:  fundraising)  and  certain  fixed  obligations  (ex:  Congressional  schedule).           Sutton’s  Obligations  Doing  Her  Job    House  in  Session    Constituent  Obligations  Raising  Money    Fundraising  Events    Fundraising  Calls  Campaigning    Field  Activities    Political  Activities    Paid  Media  Activities    Earned  Media  Activities    Staff  Time     112  
  •  Personal/Family    Thinking       Doing  Her  Job  House  in  Session  60  days  of  the  next  seven  months  will  need  to  be  spent  in  DC  casting  votes  and  legislat-­‐ing.     That   is   nearly   30%   of   the   time   available   from   now   until   Election   Day.     Although  some  of  these  are  not  whole  days  and  the  Congresswoman  may  be  able  to  hold  fundrais-­‐ing   events   or   rallies,   or   make   fundraising   calls   during   the   day.     Jim   Renacci   will   be   faced  with  similar  scheduling  issues  as  he  is  also  an  incumbent  member  of  the  House  of  Rep-­‐resentatives.          Constituent  Obligations  Although  Betty  Sutton  is  campaigning  for  reelection,  she  must  still  consider  her  obliga-­‐tions  to  her  constituents  when  she  is  back  in  the  district.    If  she  had  been  holding  office  hours,  those  will  need  to  continue.    She  will  also  need  to  keep  meeting  with  local  compa-­‐nies  and  elected  officials  that  inform  the  work  she  is  doing  in  Congress.    This  schedule  will  be  lighter  than  it  would  be  in  non-­‐election  years,  but  these  obligations  still  must  be  considered  in  Sutton’s  schedule.                     113  
  • Raising  Money  Fundraising  Events  A   goal   of   20   large   donor   events,   and   27   small   donor   events   has   been   made   from   now  until   the   end   of   the   campaign.     Though   not   every   fundraising   event   would   require   the  Congresswoman’s   presence,   most   of   them   would,   and   all   of   them   should   be   attended   by  the   congresswoman   if   possible.     The   campaign   expects   to   raise   $455,000   from   these  events.    These  events  along  with  other  fundraising  will  be  one  of  the  Congresswoman’s  priorities.        Fundraising  Calls  The   campaign   has   dedicated   four   hours   of   call   time,   five   days   per   week   for   Congress-­‐woman  Sutton  to  make  dialing-­‐for-­‐dollar  calls.    Though  this  will  taper  toward  the  end  of  the  campaign,   it   is   time   that   must   be  accounted  for  in  the  schedule   -­‐   even   when   she   is   in  DC   working.     Meeting   fundraising   goals   is   contingent   on   the   Congresswoman   continuing  to  keep  this  process  up  since  call  time  accounts  for  approximately  20%  of  the  total  fund-­‐raising  goal.         Campaigning    Field  Activities  Throughout   the   campaign,   field   organizers   will   be   keeping   an   updated   schedule   of  events  happening  throughout  the  district  at  any  given  time.    This  way,  if  Sutton  has  extra  time,  the  campaign  will  quickly  be  able  to  pivot  to  hit  extra  events.    Field  staff  will  also  have   a   process   for   requesting   the   Congresswoman’s   time   for   a   particularly   important  event   in   the   community.     Examples   of   these   types   of   events   would   be   parades,   county  fairs,   Rotary   club   functions,   local   Democratic   Party   events,   and   community   picnics.    This     114  
  • type  of  event  will  become  more  important  later  in  the  campaign  as  fundraising  begins  to  wean  and  asking  for  votes  becomes  a  larger  part  of  the  Congresswoman’s  schedule.      Political  Activities  As  a  candidate,  and  not  as  a  member  of  Congress,  the  Congresswoman  will  need  to  meet  with   various   elected   officials,   party   leadership,   union   organizations,   and   local   communi-­‐ty  leaders.    When  the  Congresswoman  meets  with  these  types  of  groups,  the  campaign  will  consider  this  a  political  activity.      Paid  Media  Activities  The   campaign   has   budgeted   to   shoot   two   paid   TV   spots,   and   a   number   of   radio   spots.    The  Congresswoman  may  be  directly  involved  in  media  production,  but  that  will  not  be  determined  until  the  media  consultant  designs  the  individual  spots.  Earned  Media  Activities  There  will  be  opportunities  for  earned  media  throughout  the  campaign.    These  types  of  events  will  include  press  conferences,  meetings  with  editorial  boards,  speaking  on  local  broadcasting  stations  and  debates.    This  will  not  be  a  large  portion  of  the  Congresswom-­‐an’s  average  day,  but  it  is  important  to  seek  these  opportunities  out  when  she  is  availa-­‐ble.     Earned   media   provides   high   value   for   the   amount   of   time   and   money   spent.     For  example,  if  Sutton  is  going  to  a  parade,  the  campaign  will  alert  the  media,  and  offer  re-­‐marks   to   a   staff   writer   or   offer   time   for   the   editorial   board   while   she   is   in   town.     The  campaign  will  also  make  the  Congresswoman  available  for  debates.    Debates  will  be  the  best,  and  cheapest  way  for  the  campaign  to  magnify  Sutton’s  record  and  public  speaking  strengths.           115  
  • Staff  Time  The  staff  will  have  a  weekly  meeting  every  Monday  morning.    When  the  Congresswoman  is  in  town  and  available,  it  is  important  that  she  attend  this  meeting  with  the  staff.    These  meetings  are  important  to  discuss  broad,  high  level  campaign  issues  and  creating  an  in-­‐clusive  team  environment.  The   Congresswoman   should   also   plan   to   have   a   call   with   the   Campaign   Manager   at   least  once  per  day.    Contract  with  the  Fundraising  Director  should  also  be  frequent.      Personal/Family  Time  The   campaign   recognizes   the   reality   that   the   Congresswoman   will   need   downtime.    What  this  means  in  practice  will  be  worked  out  with  the  scheduler,  Campaign  Manager  and  the  Congresswoman  in  advance  of  long  term  planning,  and  again  each  week  to  verify  that  personal  commitments  are  being  kept.  Thinking  Time  The  Congresswoman  will  be  inundated  with  questions,  proposals,  and  requests  from  the  campaign.    She  will  also  be  occupied  with  her  work  in  the  House  and  policy  and  bills  that  she   is   working   on.     We   recognize   that   these   are   things   that   she   will   need   time   to   con-­‐template  on   her   own.    While   this   may   not   necessarily   mean   downtime,   or   time   at   home,  she   will   require   a   certain   amount   of   time   to   generate   her   ideas,   and   work.     The   Con-­‐gresswoman   will   need   to   determine   where   she   feels   comfortable   doing   this,   and   can  schedule  this  time  as  needed.     116  
  • Appendix 15APPENDIX  A:  Betty  Sutton  Congressional  Committee  and  Caucus  List    Member,  House  Armed  Services  Committee    Member,  House  Natural  Resources  Committee    Member,  Congressional  Task  Force  on  Seniors    Member,  Biotechnology  Caucus    Member,  Cancer  Care  Working  Group    Member,  Community  College  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Arts  Caucus    Vice-­‐Chair,  Congressional  Automotive  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Career  and  Technical  Education  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Caucus  on  Parkinsons  Disease    Member,  Congressional  Diabetes  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Fire  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Heart  &  Stroke  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Hunger  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Labor  and  Working  Families  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  National  Parks  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Shipbuilding  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Spina  Bifida  Caucus    Member,  Congressional  Task  Force  on  Competitiveness     117  
  •  Co-­‐Chair,  Congressional  Task  Force  on  Job  Creation    Member,  Crohns  and  Colitis  Caucus    Member,  Diversity  and  Innovation  Caucus    Member,  Friends  of  Job  Corps  Congressional  Caucus    Member,  Great  Lakes  Task  Force    Member,  Green  Schools  Caucus    Member,  House  Afterschool  Caucus    Member,  House  Cancer  Caucus    Member,  House  Manufacturing  Caucus    Member,  House  Nursing  Caucus    Member,  House  Renewable  Energy  and  Energy  Efficiency  Caucus    Member,  House  School  and  Health  Safety  Caucus    Member,  House  Steel  Caucus    Member,  House  Trade  Working  Group    Member,  House  Veterans  Mental  Health  Caucus    Member,  Invisible  Wounds  Caucus    Member,  Law  Enforcement  Caucus    Member,  LGBT  Equality  Caucus    Member,  Northeast-­‐Midwest  Congressional  Coalition    Vice-­‐Chair,  Populist  Caucus      Member,  Research  and  Development  Caucus    Member,  STEM  Caucus    Member,  Textile  Caucus    Member,  TRIO  Caucus       118  
  • APPENDIX  B:  Betty  Sutton  Awards  List    Community  Service  Award,  Lorain  County  Community  Action  Agency  (2010)    Distinguished  Service  Award,  Ohio  Automobile  Dealers  Association  (2010)    Automotive  News  All-­‐Star  (2010)    Fighting  Freshman  Award  from  the  U.S.    Business  and  Industry  Council   (2006)    Graded  A+  on  the  Drum  Major  Institute’s  Congressional  Middle  Class  Score-­‐ card  (2006)    Legislator  of  the  Year  Award,  Ohio  American  Veterans  Association  (2009)    Graded  A+  from  The  Iraq  and  Afghanistan  Veterans  of  America  (2008)    100%  Score  by  the  Alliance  for  Retired  Americans    Sudden  Cardiac  Arrest  Coalition  Legislative  Award  (2010)    Health  Care  Leadership  Award,  American  Optometric  Association  (2010)    Champion  of  Health  Care  Innovation  Award,  Health  Care  Leadership  Council   (2009)    Defender  Award,  National  Association  of  Community  Health  Centers  (2009)    First  recipient  of  the  Sudden  Cardiac  Arrest  Association’s  (SCAA)  “Public   Leadership”  award  (2008)    100%  Score  from  the  National  Breast  Cancer  Coalitions  2008  Congressional   Record  of  Support  for  the  110th  Congress  (2008)    Great  Lakes  Legislator  of  the  Year  Award,  The  Great  Lakes  Maritime  Task   Force  (2010)    Legislative  Leader  Award  from  the  Humane  Society  (2009)    Humane  Champion  Award  from  the  Humane  Society  (2007  &  2008)     119  
  •  Named  “Friend  of  the  Farm  Bureau”  by  the  American  Farm  Bureau  Federation   (2008)    Named  Section  4  Community  Development  Champion  by  Habitat  for  Humani-­‐ ty  International  (2008)    “A”  Grade  on  the  National  Education  Association’s  Legislative  Report  Card   (2008)    Graded  “A”  by  the  Americans  for  the  Arts  Action  Fund  (2008)    Elected  President  of  the  Freshman  Class  of  Democrats  (2006)                             120  
  • APPENDIX  C:  Betty  Sutton  2012  Endorsements    Cleveland  Stonewall  Democrats    Cleveland  Building  &  Construction  Trades  Council  C.O.P.E.    Cuyahoga  County  Democratic  Party    Cuyahoga  County  Executive  Ed  FitzGerald    Medina  County  Democratic  Party    Portage  County  Democratic  Party  Chairman  Craig  Miller  Stephens    Stark  County  Democratic  Party    Summit  County  Executive  Russ  Pry    Wayne  County  Democratic  Party    North  Shore  AFL-­‐CIO    Teamsters  Ohio  D.R.I.V.E.    (Democrat,  Republican,  Independent,  Voter  Educa-­‐ tion)    Tri-­‐County  Regional  Labor  Council,  AFL-­‐CIO    EMILYs  List    National  Organization  for  Women  PAC    The  Human  Society  Legislative  Fund                 121  
  • Appendix  D:  Jim  Renacci  2012  Endorsements   Federal  Endorsements           U.S.    Senator   Rob   Portman   U.S.    Representative   Pat   Tiberi               State  Endorsements           Speaker,  Ohio  House  of  Representatives   William   Batchelder   State  Senator     Thomas   Patton   State  Senator     Frank   LaRose   Former  State  Senator     Grace   Drake   State  Representative     Anthony   DeVitis   Former  State  Representative   Lynn   Slaby   State  Representative   Marilyn   Slaby   State  Representative   Mike   Dovilla   State  Central  Committee   Curt   Braden   State  Central  Committee     Debbie   Walsh   State  School  Board     Bryan   Williams         Mayors           Mayor  of  Wooster     Breneman   Bob   Mayor  of  Westlake   Dennis   Clough   Mayor  of  City  of  Green   Dick   Norton   Mayor  of  Wadsworth   Robin   Laubaugh   Mayor  of  Strongsville   Thomas   Perciak     122  
  • Mayor  of  Rocky  River   Pamela   Bobst             Local  Endorsements           Stark  County  Republican  Party  Chairman   Jeffrey   Matthews   Former  Portage  Co.    Republican  Party  Chairman   Andrew   Manning   Green  City  Council  President   Joel   Reed   Summit  County  Council  At  Large   Bill   Roemer   Copley  Township  Trustee   Helen   Humphrys   Medina  Municipal  Courts,  Clerk  of  Courts   Nancy   Abbott   Medina  County  Recorder   Colleen   Swedyk   The  Philpott  Rubber  Company   Michael   Baach   Gerspacher  Real  Estate  Group   James   Gerspacher   Medina  County  Commissioner   Steve   Hambley   Lawrence  Township  Fiscal  Officer   Cindy   Meismer   Jackson  Township  Trustee   James   Walters   Stark  County  Auditor   Alan   Harold   Stark  County  Republican  Party  Chairwoman   Shirley   Jones   Stark  County  Treasurer   Alexander   Zumbar   Stark  County  Commissioner   Janet   Creighton   Stark  County  Central  Committee     Ralph   Spampanato   Stark  County  Republican  Central  Committee   Donise   Pick   Wadsworth  City  Council     Timothy   Eberling   Wadsworth  City  Council  President   Thomas   Palecek   Wadsworth  City  Council   Dennis   Shultz   Wadsworth  City  Council  at  Large   Elizabeth   Workman     123  
  • Wayne  County  Recorder   Jane   Carmichael   Wayne  County  Commissioner   Jim   Carmichael   Wayne  County  Vice  Chairman   John   Hall   Wayne  County  Republican  Women   Sue   Smail   Wayne  County  GOP  Chairman   James   Smail   Wayne  County  Commissioner   Scott   Wiggman   Wayne  County  Treasurer   Dawn   Zerrer   Wayne  County  Prosecutor   Daniel   Lutz   Wayne  County  Auditor   Jarra   Underwood   Rocky  River  Council  At  Large   David   Furry   Rocky  River  Republican  Club  President   Emily   Lyman   Rocky  River  Councilman     James   Moran   Rocky  River  Councilman   Michael   ODonnell   Rocky  River  Councilman   John   Shepherd   Westlake  City  Council     Mark   Getsay   Cuyahoga  County  Councilman     David   Greenspan   Westlake  Councilman   Michael   ODonnell   Cuyahoga  County  Council   Jack   Schron  Jr.   Cuyahoga  County  Republican  Party  Chairman   Rob   Frost   Cuyahoga  County  Council   Michael   Gallagher   Cuyahoga  Co.    Republican  Central  Committee   David   Gusman   Strongsville  Ward  Leader   John   Motley   Fairview  Park  City  Council   John   Hinkel   North  Olmsted  Republican  Ward  Leader   Tom   Dubowski   North  Olmsted  Republican  Club  President   Sid   King     124  
  • Parma  City  School  Board,  President   Sean   Nicklos   Green  City  Council  -­‐  At  Large   Chris     Humphrey        Organization  &  Group  Endorsements      Citizens  United  Political  Victory  Fund  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  the  United  States  of  America  Wayne  County  Republican  Women  Wayne  County  Republican  Party  The  House  Conservatives  Fund  Rocky  River  Republican  Club  Republican  Party  of  Cuyahoga  County  Ohioans  for  Concealed  Carry  Ohio  Right  to  Life  Medina  County  Republican  Party  Medina  County  Friends  &  Neighbors  Concerned  Women  of  America  BIPAC  North  Olmsted  Republican  Club  Stark  County  Republican  Party                 125  
  • Appendix  E:  County  Fact  Sheets  /  Targeting  Worksheet         126  
  •     127  
  •     128  
  •   129  
  • Portage  County  Fact  Sheet Major  Cities  (in  District  16) Mogadore  Village Total  Population:  161,419 Race:  92.9%  White,  3.9%  African  American Educational  Attainment 10.1%  no  high  school  diploma   130  
  • 40.4%  high  school  graduate 19.7%  some  college 5.9%  associates  degree 15.1%  bachelor’s  degree 9%  master’s  degree  or  higher Median  Age:  37.0 Unemployment  Rate:  7.8% Median  Income:  $50,079 Below  poverty  level:  7.2% Major  Industries: Manufacturing Government Retail Health  Care Education Major  Employers: Kent  State  University Robinson  Memorial  Hospital Portage  County  Government Kent  City  Schools East  Manufacturing  Corp  -­‐   Manufacturing General  Electric  Company  –  Manufacturing Kent  City  Board  of  Education McMaster-­‐Carr  Supply  Co.    -­‐   Trade Ravenna  City  School State  of  Ohio Step2Company  -­‐   Manufacturing   131  
  • Stark  County  Fact  Sheet Major  Cities  (in  CD  16) North  Canton Canal  Fulton Hartville Population:  375,586 Race:  89.6%  white,  7.2%  African  American Median  Age:  40.3 Families  living  below  poverty  level:  9.6% Educational  Attainment 12.8%  no  high  school  diploma   132  
  • 41.6%  high  school  diploma 19.4%  some  college 6.5%  associate’s  degree 13.1%  bachelor’s  degree 6.5%  master’s  degree  or  higher Unemployment  Rate:  8.3% Median  Household  Income:  $44,999 Major  Industry Manufacturing Healthcare  and  Social  Assistance Retail Accommodation  and  Food  Service Major  Employers Alliance  Community  Hospital Aultman  Hospital Canton  City  Schools Fisher  Food GE  Capital Mercy  Medical  Center PCC  Airfoils  LLC  –  Manufacturing Republic  Engineered  Products  –  Manufacturing Stark  County  Government Wal-­‐Mart  Stores  Inc.   133  
  • Summit  County  Fact  Sheet Major  Cities: Green  City New  Franklin  City Norton  City Total  Population:  541,781 Race:  82.1%  white,  13.9%  African  American   134  
  • Median  Age:  39.1 Educational  Attainment 10.7%  no  high  school  diploma  33.1%  high  school  diploma 20.1%  some  college 7.5%  associates  degree 18.8%  bachelor’s  degree 9.9%  master’s  degree Unemployment  Rate:  7.8% Median  Income:  $47,776 Major  Industry Manufacturing Healthcare  and  Social  Assistance Accommodation  and  Food  Service Retail Government Major  Employers Summa  Health  Systems County  of  Summit Akron  General  Health  System Akron  Public  Schools Goodyear  Tire  and  Rubber  Co. University  of  Akron City  of  Akron FirstEnergy  Corp  -­‐ Akron  Children’s  Hospital Diebold  Inc.  -­‐  Security,  Manufacturing McDermott  International  -­‐  Construction   135  
  • Wayne  County  Fact  Sheet Major  Cities Wooster Orriville  City Rittman  City Doylestown  Village Creston  Village Dalton  Village Shreve  Village West  Salem  Village Smithville  Village Appple  Creek  Village Population:  114,520       136  
  •   Race:  96.2%  white,  1.4%  African  American Median  Age:  37.6 Families  living  below  the  poverty  line:  7.8% Educational  Attainment 15.5%  no  high  school  diploma 43.4%  high  school  diploma 16.2%  some  college 6.1%  associate  degree 12.0%  bachelor’s  degree 6.7%  master’s  degree  or  higher Unemployment  Rate:  7.1% Median  Household  Income:  $48,474 Major  Industry Manufacturing Retail Accommodation  and  Food  Service Construction Major  Employers College  of  Wooster Buehler  Food  Markets Frito-­‐Lay  Inc.  –  Manufacturing JM  Smucker  Co.  –  Manufacturing LuK  Inc.  –  Manufacturing State  of  Ohio Will-­‐Burt  Co.  –  Manufacturing Wooster  Schools Wooster  Community  Hospital Wooster  Brush  Co.  –  Manufacturing Worthington  Ind/Gerstenslager  Co.  –  Manufacturing       137  
  •     138  
  • Appendix  F:  Sample  Fundraising  Events    PAC  Fundraiser  Washington  D.C.  What:  Labor  and  Federal  Postal  Coalition  Breakfast    Where:  National  Democratic  Club  When:  Jun  18,  2012  Campaign:  Betty  Sutton  for  Congress  Suggested  Contributions:  $5,000  Host;  $2,500  Co-­‐Host;  $1,000  Individual    Major  Donor  Event  in  District  What:  Fundraising  Reception  Where:  Akron,  OH  When:  July  14,  2012  Campaign:  Betty  Sutton  for  Congress  Suggested  Contributions:  $5,000  Couple  Host;  $2,500  Individual  Host;  $1000  Individu-­‐al  Guest;  $500  Friend    Small  Donor  Event  in  District  What:  Small  Donor  House  Party  Where:  Parma  Heights,  OH  When:  August  4,  2012  Campaign:  Betty  Sutton  for  Congress  Suggested  Contributions:  $250  Individual  Host;  $100  Supporter;  $50  Friend     139  
  • Appendix  G:  Sample  Fundraising  Email      D ear  {{First.Name}},    We’re  less  than  24  hours  way  from  the  end  of  the  reporting  period,  and  we  need  your  help!    We  need  to  raise  $2,736  before  midnight  to  meet  our  fundraising  goal.          Can  we  count  on  you  to  contribute  $100,  $50,  $25  or  whatever  you  can  to  help  meet  our  goal  today?    Republicans  like  Jim  Renacci  are  more  interested  in  giving  tax  breaks  to  the  super-­‐rich  and  gutting  the  Medicare  benefits  seniors  depend  on  than  representing  working  families  like  yours.    If  you  haven’t  donated  to  Betty  yet,  now  is  the  time.      Let’s  send  a  message  to  Jim  Renacci  and  the  Republicans  that  Betty  is  the  strongest  candidate  in  this  race.          Your  contribution  of  $100,  $50,  $25  or  whatever  you  can  afford  will  bring  us  closer   to  our  goal!    Outside   Republican   groups   like   the   National   Republican   Congressional   Committee   are  planning  to  spend  millions  of  dollars  to  defeat  Betty  this  year.    With  your  contribution  before  midnight  tonight,  we  can  show  Republicans  that  Ohioans  support  Betty  Sutton!    Thank  you  for  your  support,    {{Finance  Director’s  Name}}  Finance  Director  Betty  Sutton  for  Congress                       Paid  for  by  Sutton  for  Congress.       140  
  • Appendix  H:  Sample  Fundraising  Mail     Betty  Sutton  for  Congress   [[Date  of  Postal  Drop]]  [[Full  Name]]  [[Address]]    D ear  [[First  Name]],  Can  you  feel  the  momentum?  This  week  we  took  our  message  about  building  a  better  Ohio  to  voters  across  the  district  with  our  first  radio  ad.        And  the  response  we’ve  seen  has  been  remarka-­‐ble.  Thanks  to  your  past  support,  Ohio  voters  are  learning  what  Jim  Renacci  and  the  Republi-­‐cans  in  Congress  have  in  store  for  Ohio.      When  looking  towards  November,  we  should  ask  what  Jim  Renacci  is  doing  for  the  middle  class.    If  it  is  anything  like  what  he  record  so  far,  then  we  are  looking  forward  to  another  two  years  with  a  corporate  crusader  who  is  only  standing  up  for  the  super-­‐rich.         141  
  • Why  trust  someone  who  is  a  corporate  multi-­‐millionaire  who  refused  to  pay  $1.4  million  in  personal  taxes,  while  taxing  lower  and  middle  class  families?  Why   trust   someone   who   supports   the   Ryan-­‐Renacci   Plan,   which   would   increase   pre-­‐scription   drug   costs   for   9,000   Medicare   beneficiaries   and   deny   access   to   Medicare’s  guaranteed  benefits  to  470,000  individuals  under  the  age  55  in  our  district  alone.  [[First  Name]],  you  helped  me  get  this  campaign  up  and  running  and  it  is  critical  that  we  keep  the  momentum  going  and  prevent  Renacci  from  going  back  to  Washington  to  fight  against  the  people  in  our  district.  Can   you   contribute   $<largest.donation>   today   to   keep   spreading   our   message?  With   your   help   we   will   raise   enough   money   to   put   our   message   up   on   television  earlier  to  educate  Ohio  voters  about  Jim  Renacci’s  disastrous  actions  in  Congress.  You   deserve  someone  who  is  willing  to  represent  your  interests  and  look  out  for  your  needs—not  the  interests  of  big  corporations.  As   a   native   Ohioan,   I   was   raised   to   know   the   values   of   hard   work,   honesty,   and   working  together.    These  are  our  Ohio  values.    Since  2006  I  have  worked  hard  to  bring  Ohio  val-­‐ues  to  Congress.      Wall  Street  and  Special  Interest  Groups  have  enough  representation  in  Congress  without  Jim  Renacci’s  help.  Every  Day,  my  work  is  in  line  with  my  only  special  interest.    The  special  interest  of  build-­‐ing  a  better  Ohio.  Ohio  needs  strong  leadership  in  its  recovery  from  the  economic  crisis.     142  
  • Please  help  us  build  Ohio  jobs  and  support  our  industries  by  contributing  $<larg-­‐est>  today!  We  can’t  do  it  without  you.    Thank  you,  Betty  Sutton  P.S.    A  contribution  of  $25,  $50,  or  $100  will  help  me  continue  to  fight  for  Ohio’s  jobs,  and  build  a  better  life  for  Ohioans.    Together  we  can  make  Ohio  a  better  place.    I’m  counting  on  you.   Don’t  have  you  checkbook  handy?  Contribute  online:   www.bettysuttonforcongress.com/contribute       Paid  for  by  Sutton  for  Congress.    Contributions  are  not  tax-­‐deductible  for  federal  income  tax  purposes.    Federal  law  prohibits  corpora-­‐tions   and   foreign   contributions.     Federal   law   requires   a   contribution   of   $50   or   more   be   accompanied  by   the   following   information   from   the   contributor:   name,   address,   and   occupation.     Any   individual  may  only  contribute  up  to  $2,500  for  the  primary,  and  $2,500  for  the  general  election.                 143  
  • Appendix  I:  Sample  Persuasion  Mail  FRONT                               144  
  • Sample  Persuasion  Mail  BACK                               145  
  • Appendix  J:  Sutton  Positive  Ad  Script   Audio   Visuals   VO:  When  Ohio  was  down  on  its  luck,  we   Scene  in  an  auto  manufacturing  plant   needed  someone  to  stand  up  for  us  and   working  on  an  assembly  line.   help  us  rebuild.   VO:  Congresswoman  Betty  Sutton  spon-­‐ Zooms  in  on  an  auto  part,  like  a  brake  or   sored  a  bill  to  keep  Americans  buying   engine.   American  made  products.       Text  Graphic  appears  on  auto  part:  “Made   Sound  effect:  metal  on  metal  as  text  appears   in  USA.”     Source:  HR  1684,  2011   VO:  She  voted  to  keep  struggling  families   Text  Graphic  appears  on  auto  part:  “Ex-­‐ on  their  feet.   tended  Unemployment  Benefits”       Sound  effect:  metal  on  metal  as  text  appears   Source:    HR  4851,  2010   VO:  And  she  voted  to  keep  our  jobs  here  in   Text  Graphic  appears  on  auto  part:  “Ohio   Ohio.   Jobs”       Sound  effect:  metal  on  metal  as  text  appears   Source:  HR  3078,  3079  and  3080,  2011   “I’m  Betty  Sutton  and  I  approve  this  mes-­‐ Betty  on  Camera  on  front  porch  with  hus-­‐ sage  because  I  believe  that  together  we  can   band  and  dog.   build  a  better  Ohio.”                       146  
  • Appendix  K:  Sutton  Contrast  Ad  Script       Audio       Visual   “I’m  so  disappointed.”   Senior  Citizen  Woman   “I’m  so  disappointed.”   Little  Girl  with  her  Mom   “I’m  so  disappointed  in  you,  Jim  Renacci.     Blue  Collar  Factory  Worker   You  voted  to  send  our  jobs  overseas”     Source:    HR  3078,  3079,  and  3080,  2011   “Jim  Renacci,  you  support  the  Ryan  Plan   Senior  Citizen  Woman   that  cuts  my  Medicare.”     Source:  Voted  Yes  on  H  Con  Res  34,  2011   “Jim  Renacci,  I’m  so  disappointed  in  you.       Mom  and  Little  Girl   Betty  Sutton  is  for  me  because  she  supports   working  families.”   “Betty  Sutton  is  for  me  because  she’s  kept   Senior  Citizen  Woman   her  promise  to  protect  our  seniors.”     Source:  Voted  Yes  on  HR  2576  (2011)  and   HR  4  (2007)   “Betty  Sutton  is  for  me!”   Blue  Collar  Factory  Worker   “Betty  Sutton  is  for  me!”   Close  up  on  Little  Girl   “I’m  Betty  Sutton  and  I  approve  this  mes-­‐ B  Roll  of  Betty     sage.”                   147  
  •  Betty for Congress Apr 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Constituent Work Period Begin Field IDs 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Mailer @ 500 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Constituent Work Period 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Benchmark Poll in the Field @ the Field 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 DC Work Period No Votes 1 2 p m - Small 148   Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 6 p m - Large Donor Event 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 No Votes DC Work Period 1 1 : 3 0 a m - Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 5 p m - Small Donor Event 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 Constituent Work Period 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Mailer @ 500 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Event  
  •  Betty for Congress May 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 Constituent Work Period 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Mailer @ 500 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Event 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 DC Work Period No Votes 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 6 p m - Large Donor Event 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Mothers Day No Votes DC Work Period 6 p m - Large 149   Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Event 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Constituent Work Period 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster Lions Club Meeting @ Ryans Grill, Buffet & 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 Bakery Memorial Day - No Votes 1 0 a m - Call time DC Work Period 9 a m - Brandy Federal Holiday Winfield Memorial Day 1 0 a m - Call time 6 : 3 0 p m - No Votes 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Memorial Parade Event until Run @ 1 0 a m - Call time Marion County Fair Grounds  
  •  Betty for Congress Jun 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 Memorial Day - No Votes 1 0 a m - Call time DC Work Period 9 a m - Brandy Federal Holiday Winfield Memorial Day 1 0 a m - Call time 6 : 3 0 p m - No Votes 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Memorial Parade Event until Run @ 1 0 a m - Call time Marion County Fair Grounds 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Begin Field No Votes DC Work Period 6 p m - Large Persuasion Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Small Donor Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event Fundraising Mail Mailer @ 500 1 0 a m - 0 l tce e @ 1 0 , 0 0C apli e i m s 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster Lions Club Meeting @ Ryans Grill, Buffet & 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Bakery Constituent Work Period 6 p m - Large 150   Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 5 : 3 0 p m - Small 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Donor Event Event 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 DC Work Period No Votes 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Lions Donor Club Event Meeting @ Ryans Grill, Buffet & 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Bakery No Votes DC Work Period 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Event  
  •  Betty for Congress Jul 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Constituent Work Period Cuyahoga County Office Opening 1 0 a m - Call time July 4th Event in Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 6 p m - Large Medina Mailer @ 500 Donor 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Event Donor Mailer @ 15,000 Lions Donor Event 10am pieces- C a l l t i m e Club Event Meeting @ Ryans Grill, Buffet & 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Bakery DC Work Period No Votes 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Event 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 FEC Filing No Votes DC Work Period 6 p m - Large Deadline for 4/1 - Donor 6/30 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 70th Strongsville Homecoming @ Strongsville Commons Event 151   1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 6 : 3 0 p m - Strongsvill 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster e Parade @ Lions corner of Club Progress Meeting Parkway @ Ryans 22 23 24 and Pearl 2 5 Grill, 26 27 28 Road and Buffet & DC Work Period Johnny Appleseed Festival and Parade @ continues Bakery Apple Creek 1 0 a m - Call time to the Summit County Fair (Tallmadge) @ Tallmadge Commons 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time No Votes 1 0 a m - Call time 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor Event 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 Summit County Medina County Fair (Medina) @ Medina Fair (Tallmadge) @ Tallmadge No Votes DC Work Period 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 1 0 a m - Memorial 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster Day Lions Parade @ Club Old Meeting Courthous @ Ryans e on Grill, Broadway Buffet & and Bakery   Washingto n
  •  Betty for Congress Aug 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 Summit County Medina County Fair (Medina) @ Medina Fair (Tallmadge) @ Tallmadge No Votes DC Work Period 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 1 0 a m - Memorial 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster Day Lions Parade @ Club Old Meeting Courthous @ Ryans e on Grill, 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Broadway Buffet & Medina County Cuyahoga County Fair (Berea) @ Berea and Bakery Fair (Medina) @ Washingto Medina Constituent Work Period n 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Small Donor Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event Mailer @ 15,000 Mailer @ 1000 5 : 3 0 p m - Small 10am pieces- C a l l t i m e 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 6 p m - Large Donor Donor Event Event 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 152   Cuyahoga County Constituent Work Period 6 p m - Large Fair (Berea) @ Donor Berea 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Lions Donor Club Event Meeting @ Ryans Grill, 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Buffet & Constituent Work Period Bakery 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Portage County Fair (Randolph) @ Randolph Event 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 Portage County Constituent Work Period - Republican Convention 6 p m - Large Fair (Randolph) @ Donor Randolph 1 0 a m - Call time Stark County Fair (Canton) @ Canton Event 5 : 3 0 p m - Small 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Donor Event 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Lions Donor Club Event Meeting @ Ryans Grill, Buffet & Bakery  
  •  Betty for Congress Sep 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 Portage County Constituent Work Period - Republican Convention 6 p m - Large Fair (Randolph) @ Donor Randolph 1 0 a m - Call time Stark County Fair (Canton) @ Canton Event 5 : 3 0 p m - Small 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Donor Event 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Lions Donor Club Event 2 3 4 5 Meeting 6 7 8 @ Ryans Stark County Fair (Canton) @ Canton Constituent Work Period - Democrat Convention Grill, Wayne County Buffet & Fair (Wooster) @ Labor Day Holiday Online Advertising Large Donor1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Wooster Bakery Begins Mailer @ 1000 1 0 a m - Call time Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time pieces 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Mailer @ 15,000 Donor 10am pieces- C a l l t i m e Event 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Wayne County Fair (Wooster) @ Wooster 1 0 a m - Call time 6 p m - Large Donor DC Work Period Event 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 5 : 3 0 p m - Small 153   Donor 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster Event Lions Club 16 17 18 19 Meeting 20 21 22 @ Ryans Rosh Hashanah No Votes No Votes - Rosh DC Work Period Grill, 5 : 3 0 p m - Small begins at Hashanah ends at Buffet & Donor Sundown @ 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - C ll Sundowna@ t i m e 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event Bakery Sundown Sundown 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Constituent Work Week 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 : 3 0 a m - Tour of Yom Kippur 1 0 a m - Call time W o o s t e r f e s t @ D o w n t ov en tW o o s t e r Ewn Manufa 1 t umi n g a l l t i m e cp r - C Radio Cleveland 1 0 a m - Call time 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 1 0 a m - Call time Plant @ Begins Lions 1 0 a m - Call time Club 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Manufa Donor cturing Meeting @ Ryans Event 30 Plant 1 2 3 4 5 6 Grill, Buffet & Switch to GOTV DC Work Period 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Bakery Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Absentee Ballots Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event Go Out Mailer @ 500 Radio Akron and 1 0 a m - Call time pieces Canton Begins Small Donor Mailer @ 25,000 10am pieces- C a l l t i m e  
  •  Betty for Congress Oct 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 Switch to GOTV DC Work Period 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Absentee Ballots Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event Go Out Mailer @ 500 Radio Akron and 1 0 a m - Call time pieces Canton Begins Small Donor Mailer @ 25,000 10am pieces- C a l l t i m e 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Columbus Day Constituent Work Period 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Deadline for Voter 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time Event Registration Social, Online 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster 5 : 3 0 p m - Small Media Buys Begin Lions Donor TV Buys Begin Club Event 1 0 a m - Call time Meeting @ Ryans Grill, Buffet & Bakery 154   14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Constituent Work Period Filing Deadline for 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 7/1 - 9/30 1 0 a m - Call time 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Constituent Work Period 1 0 a m - Call time Possible TV 1 0 a m - Call time Pre-General Filing Personal Increase Buy for 10/1 - 10/17 Endorsement 1 0 a m - Call time 1 0 a m - Call time 1 ai e C ll t m M0 almr - @ a5 0 0i0 e 6 : 3 0 p m - Wooster pieces Lions Club Meeting @ Ryans 28 29 30 31 Grill, 1 2 3 Buffet & Constituent Work Period Bakery 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Possible TV Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Last Day to vote Event Increase Buy Mailer @ 500 absentee in 1 0 a m - Call time 1 i ea m - C a l l t i m e p0 ce 10am - person Call time  
  •  Betty for Congress Nov 2012 (Eastern Time) Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 Constituent Work Period 6 p m - Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Possible TV Large Donor 1 0 a m - Call time Last Day to vote Event Increase Buy Mailer @ 500 absentee in 1 0 a m - Call time 1 i ea m - C a l l t i m e p0 ce 10am - person Call time 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 72 Hour GOTV Plan Last day to mail Election Day absentee ballot 6 : 3 0 a m - Polls Open 155   11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1          
  • Appendix  L:  Volunteer  Encouragements      Canvassing   Competition   -­‐   Canvassers   who   knock   on   the   most   doors   in   one   day   get   a  campaign  yard  sign  and  poster.    The  Phone  Call  Wall  -­‐  Each  office  will  have  a  white  board  on  which  the  funniest  phone  call  responses  will  be  written  with  less  than  250  characters.    At  the  end  of  the  day  the  volunteers   will   vote   on   the   funniest   phone   call   responses   which   will   be   held  on   a   poster  until  the  end  of  the  campaign.    At  the  end  of  the  campaign  the  funniest  two  quotes  will  be  chosen  and  rewarded  with  a  signed  campaign  poster  signed  by  Rep.    Betty  Sutton.    Social  Media  Likes  -­‐  The  volunteer  who  gets  the  most  likes  for  Betty  Sutton’s  Facebook  page  or  followers  on  twitter  will  receive  a  signed  picture  of  themselves  with  Betty  Sut-­‐ton.    This  will  be  a  monthly  competition  to  keep  volunteers  promoting  the  social  media  sites.    Buttons  for  Sutton  -­‐  The  campaign  stickers  will  say  “Buttons  for  Sutton”  We  will  produce  a  limited  number  of  these  buttons  and  give  them  to  outstanding  volunteers  and  donors  as  collectors  items  for  the  race.             156  
  • Betty  Sutton:  Announcement  Speech    T hank  you  for  being  here  today!    It’s  great  to  be  in  Summit  County.    It’s  great   to  be  home.    And,  as  always,  it’s  always  great  to  be  in  Ohio.      I   grew   up   here   in   Summit   County.     I   was   born   over   in   Barberton   where   my   mother  worked  at  our  local  public  library.    My  father  was  a  World  War  two  veteran  who  worked  as  a  local  boiler-­‐maker.      I  am  the  youngest  of  six  kids  and  my  parents  had  to  work  really  hard  to  provide  for  us.    They  sent  us  to  public  schools  and  pushed  us  to  pursue  a  higher  education.      But,   more   importantly   than   any   of   that,   my   parents   always   told   us   that   hard   work   is   the  path  to  success.    There  are  no  easy  roads.    And  so  they  told  us  that  we’d  need  to  look  out  for  each  other,  to  work  together,  and  to  be  responsible  for  our  actions.      These  are  my  family’s  values.    These  are  Ohio  values.    And  five  years  ago,  you  sent  me  to  Washington  to  bring  Ohio  values  to  congress.      And  my  parents  were  right.    I  haven’t  found  an  easy  road  to  bring  Ohioans  the  prosperity  they  deserve,  but  I’m  working  hard,  and  we’ve  seen  the  economy  begin  to  turn  around.    We’ve  seen  jobs  come  back  to  the  state.    And  we’ve  seen  our  industries  begin  the  path  to  recovery.      In   Congress,   I’ve   done   everything   I   could   to   represent   you.     The   votes   I’ve   made   have  always   been   in   line   with   my   one   special   interest.     The   interest   of   building   a   better  Ohio.      This  means  so  much  to  me  because  it’s  what  all  of  you  are  doing  every  day.    Here  in  Ohio,  we  still  build  things.    We’re  building  tractors  and  we’re  making  parts  for  the  American     157  
  • auto   industry.     We   create   jobs   and   markets   better   than   almost   any   other   state   in   the   na-­‐tion.  And  Ohio’s  unemployment  rate  is  lower  than  the  nation’s.    At  a  little  over  7%,  it’s  a  relief  from  where  we  were,  but  it’s  only  a  beginning  to  where  we  need  to  be.    But  still,  we’re  proof  that  America  is  on  the  right  track.    We  are  an  example  of  the  recovery.        And  this  is  the  track  I’ll  continue  on  when  you  send  me  back  to  Washington  this  year.      I   promise   to   keep   fighting   for   new,   high-­‐tech,   and   manufacturing   jobs   for   Ohioans   and  for  Americans.      I’ll  work  with  both  sides  of  the  isle  to  find  a  ballanced  approach  to  our  debt  crisis.      I  promise  to  continue  the  fight  for  quality,  affordable  health  care  for  all  Americans.        I’ll   keep   promoting   the   goods   you   produce   here,   and   lead   the   campaign   for   Buying  American  Made.  And  I’ll  hold  congress  accountable  for  keeping  the  promises  we  made  to  our  military  -­‐  to  care  for  them  both  during  their  service  and  after.      But  this  fight  to  continue  to  represent  you  in  congress  won’t  be  an  easy  one.      There  are  people  in  this  race  who  think  that  the  Congress  should  be  looking  out  for  an-­‐other   type   of   special   interest.     The   special   interest   of   giving   tax   brakes   to   corporation  that  caused  the  financial  meltdown,  giving  tax  brakes  to  corporations  who  are  shipping  jobs  overseas,  and  giving  tax  brakes  to  corporations  who  are  doing  their  business  from  offshore  tax  havens  so  they  don’t  have  to  pay  their  fair  share.     158  
  • I  think  Wall  Street  has  enough  representation  in  congress,  and  Ohioans  deserve  better.    I  won’t   sit   on   the   sidelines   while   my   opponent   enriches   millionaires   at   the   expense   of   the  Ohio  workers.        And   because   of   this,   Jim   Renacci   and   the   Republicans   in   Ohio   have   done   everything   they  can   to   keep   me   from   representing   you   in   congress.     They   have   redistricted   this   seat.    They  have  told  you  that  I  don’t  believe  in  America.      And  they  have  told  me  that  my  place  is  not  in  the  House  but  back  in  the  kitchen.      But  I  have  news  for  them,  not  only  can  I  cook,  but  I  can  serve.      So  let  me  continue  serving  you  as  your  representative  in  Congress!  With   your   help   we   will   win   this   race,   and   make   sure   that   the   workers   and   the   middle  class  continue  to  have  their  voice  heard  in  Washington!       With  your  help,  today  -­‐  we  begin  building  a  better     OHIO             159