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Conduct disorder resource
 

Conduct disorder resource

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    Conduct disorder resource Conduct disorder resource Presentation Transcript

    • Conduct Disorder Humberto Guevara EPS 506
    • Introduction
      • In the following presentation I will provide important and useful information for Conduct Disorder. I have divided the resource for students, parents, and teachers as a tool to look for signs for conduct disorder and ways it can be addressed by all three to get help if it is needed and wanted. I hope this is helpful and useful.
    • Students
      • Do you ever feel like doing any of the following?
        • Bullying and Fighting
        • Breaking rules or laws
        • Cruel or aggressive behaviors towards people or animals
        • Destruction of property
        • Drinking and/or illicit drug use
        • Lying of Deceit
        • Stealing
        • Shoplifting
    • Students
      • Do you feel like doing these things even when people ask you to stop?
      • Do you feel like doing these things where ever you are?
      • If you have you are not alone.
        • These are signs of conduct disorder. Over the next couple of slides we will talk about what conduct disorder is and ways you can talk about it with your parents or an adult
    • Students
      • So what is conduct disorder:
        • Mental Health America- Conduct disorder is a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in children and adolescents in which the rights of others or basic social rules are violated. The child or adolescent usually exhibits these behavior patterns in a variety of settings—at home, at school, and in social situations—and they cause significant impairment in his or her social, academic, and family functioning. (www.nmha.org)
    • Students
      • So what does that mean:
        • Conduct disorder is when kids show consistent and persistent behaviors that hurt themselves and other people (fighting, bullying, stealing, etc.). These behaviors can happen anywhere are anytime and can affect your relationships at home and school. It can also lead you to struggle at school academically. Along with conduct disorder there may be other things going on like a learning disability like ADD or ADHD.
    • Students
      • There are many causes of conduct disorder and some that may affect you are:
        • Family Conflicts
        • School Failure
        • Traumatic Life Experiences
        • There are more serious one’s you may want to talk to an adult about.
    • Students
      • So how do we deal with this:
        • Talk to your parents if you ever feel like doing any of the things on the list you were shown
        • If you don’t feel like talking to your parents/guardians talk to an adult at school; teacher, counselor, principal
        • If you are struggling at school, talking to your parents/guardians, about seeing if there are other issues going on that a doctor may need to address
        • The sooner you talk to someone the sooner everyone can help you figure out what would be the best options for you
    • Students
      • Here are some options:
        • Talking with a professional (psychologist, social worker)
        • Being cooperative with the people who are trying to help you
        • Talking with a professional about what you and your parents/guardians can do at home
        • Seeing if being in a
        • Being honest when people ask you questions about how you feel
        • Remember everyone is trying to do what is best for you
    • Student
      • Don’t be afraid, your parents want to help you succeed along with those at school. Just ask for help and with the proper plan you can learn to make good decisions and choices. Conduct disorder is something you can learn to cope with and manage.
    • Parents
      • Have you noticed your child doing any of the following on a consistent basis:
        • Bullying and Fighting
        • Breaking rules or laws
        • Cruel or aggressive behaviors towards people or animals
        • Destruction of property
        • Drinking and/or illicit drug use
        • Lying of Deceit
        • Stealing
        • Shoplifting
      • These may be signs of conduct disorder.
      • What is conduct disorder:
        • Mental Health America- Conduct disorder is a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in children and adolescents in which the rights of others or basic social rules are violated. The child or adolescent usually exhibits these behavior patterns in a variety of settings—at home, at school, and in social situations—and they cause significant impairment in his or her social, academic, and family functioning. (www.nmha.org)
    • Parents
      • What does this mean:
        • Conduct disorder is when you notice your child showing a consistent pattern of behavior that is either hurts them or someone else. It can happen anywhere and can lead to a deterioration of friendships and relationships with kids and people at school, home, or community. It can also lead to your child struggling at school. Also with conduct disorder there may be other undetected learning disabilities such as ADD or ADHD
    • Parents
      • What are some causes:
        • Child Abuse
        • Family Conflicts
        • Genetic Defects
        • Parental Drug Addiction or Alcoholism
        • Brain Damage
        • School Failure
        • Traumatic Life Experiences
      • These may not all apply to your child and you
    • Parents
      • So what are some options you have to help your child:
        • Talk to your child about what you have noticed
        • Talk to your child’s school/teacher to see if they have noticed a similar pattern
        • Ask your child’s school for a reference to a professional and child behavior
        • Ask your child’s school/teacher is their behaviors have affect their school work and performance
        • Ask your child’s school/teacher if other issues (learning disability) can be ruled out
    • Parents
      • Options continued:
        • Seek help from a professional as soon as possible
          • The sooner you can learn if your child does have a conduct disorder the sooner you can get help
        • There are other resources at the end to help with more options
    • Parents
      • Outcomes if your child has a conduct disorder:
        • First, there is hope with your help, social worker, psychologist, and your child to overcome this
        • The sooner it is diagnosed the better the outcome for your child’s future
        • A well thought out plan with everyone involved will be the best for you and your child to succeed
    • Educators
      • Have you noticed any of your students showing any of the following behaviors:
        • Bullying and Fighting
        • Breaking rules or laws
        • Cruel or aggressive behaviors towards people or animals
        • Destruction of property
        • Lying of Deceit
        • Stealing
        • Truancy (especially before the age of 13)
    • Educators
      • These are signs that a student may have conduct disorder.
      • What is conduct disorder:
        • Mental Health America- Conduct disorder is a repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in children and adolescents in which the rights of others or basic social rules are violated. The child or adolescent usually exhibits these behavior patterns in a variety of settings—at home, at school, and in social situations—and they cause significant impairment in his or her social, academic, and family functioning. (www.nmha.org)
    • Educators
      • As an educator, this is the student who is always bullying or harassing students, getting into fights, being physically and verbally aggressive to other students, steals from other students and teacher, destroys school property, can’t sustain relationships with friends, other students, or staff/teacher, talks about getting in trouble outside of school. This can lead to academic problems and giving up on work.
    • Educators
      • Possible causes:
        • Child Abuse
        • Family Conflicts
        • Genetic Defects
        • Parental Drug Addiction or Alcoholism
        • Brain Damage
        • School Failure
        • Traumatic Life Experiences
    • Educators
      • What can we do:
        • Talk to other teachers and take data if this child has shown these behaviors in other classes
        • Talk to the student about what may be going on at school or home
        • Talk to your school admin, counselor, social worker, psychologist about your concerns
        • Talk to school staff about a possible referral to see if there is a learning disability that may explain academic struggles
    • Educators
      • What to do continued:
        • The sooner you can notice the pattern of behavior change the better for the child
        • Be a part of the plan and team to help the child
        • Don’t be afraid to ask questions and for help from a professional
        • In the end we are trying to help the child and the family
    • Additional Information
      • The following is helpful information for students, parents, and educators along with resources and references.
    • Treatment
      • Treatment for Conduct Disorder can be difficult and complex. Treatment usually involves both child and parents. The child’s uncooperative nature can make treatment difficult. Treatment may involve medication for depression and ADD, which are also usually present with conduct disorder. In case of abuse, the best treatment for children is to be removed from the situation. Special Ed classes may also be necessary for children with a LD. Treatment is rarely short since you are trying to establish new attitudes within the child.
    • Prognosis
      • Children who have severe and frequent symptoms have the poorest treatment outcome.
      • Research shows that early and structured interventions in the home and school are the most effective.
      • Recent research also shows that not all children with conduct disorder to not go on to have problems as adults
      • Research also shows when treatment is not enacted early these children can grow up to have anti-social personality disorder.
    • Prognosis
      • There are no treatment facilities for children with conduct disorders.
      • Parents are warned to stay away from such programs as “boot camps, “behavior modification schools,” or “wilderness camps” as they tend to have programs that are confrontational and they maybe more harmful than helpful.
      • Early intervention, family counseling, anger management counseling, and a treatment program that involves the child, family, teachers, and medical specialist are the best forms of treatment and prevention.
    • Resources
      • Resources for more information on conduct disorder are:
        • Child, Adolescent and Family Branch Division of Service System Improvement Center for Mental Health Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 6-1035 Rockville, MD 20850 Tel: (240) 276-1887 www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/cmhs/ChildrensCampaign
    • Resources
      • Resources continued:
        • The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 3615 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20016-3007 Tel: (202) 966-7300 Fax: (202) 966-2891 www.aacap.org Conduct Disorder Children With Oppositional Defiant Disorder
    • Resources
      • Resources continued:
        • ConductDisorders.com - Site set up by parents of challenging children
        • National Mental Health Association 2001 N. Beauregard Street, 12th Floor Alexandria, VA 22311 Tel: (703) 684-7722, Toll-free: (800) 969-NMHA (6642) TTY: (800) 433-5959 Fax: (703) 684-5968 www.nmha.org Conduct Disorder fact sheet
        • As so check local and regional residential treatment facilities
    • References
      • http://www.aboutourkids.org/families/disorders_treatments/az_disorder_guide/conduct_disorder/support_resources
      • https://health.google.com/health/ref/Conduct+disorder
      • http://aacap.org/page.ww?name=Conduct+Disorder&section=Facts+for+Families
      • http://www.nmha.org/go/conduct-disorder
    • Reflection
      • I see this resources being broken up into three parts. There is a lot on information that can lead to a discussion among all three groups. This could also be made into a pamphlet and keep in guidance departments or social workers office. You could also give this as a professional development presentation to a staff who may not be used to dealing with students with conduct disorder. The information give can lead to both individual and group discussions and exploration of more information for more specific issues or concerns.