Business Model Innovation For Water Services

2,287 views
1,882 views

Published on

This presentation highlights potential business model innovations for the provision of water services in low-income countries. It highlights four types of business model innovations and discusses the specific aspects of each business model.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,287
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
106
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Business Model Innovation For Water Services

  1. 1. Business Model Innovation in the Water Sector Safe and affordable water services in the lowincome segment Heiko Gebauer Associate Professor Business Innovation Environmental Social Sciences (EAWAG), Zurich, Switzerland Center of Service Research, Karlstad University, Sweden Zurich, 06-05-2013
  2. 2. Key facts on water in low-income countries Water safety: arsenic, fluoride, bacteria, and so on Water scarcity: physical and economic scarcity Human water consumption: drinking water, hygiene water, sanitation Legal issue: Drinking water as a human right Water users: agriculture has highest water demand, industry, and private water consumption Water sources: surface water, rainwater, groundwater, or sea water
  3. 3. India as a “hot spot” of physical and economic water scarcity Source: Harish Kumar Jeswani , AdisaAzapagic (2012)
  4. 4. India –water supply and demand gap Addams, L., G. Boccaletti, M. Kerlin, and M. Stuchtey. 2009. Charting Our Water Future: Economic Frameworks to Inform Decision-making. Available at: http://www.mckinsey.com/App_Media/Reports/Water/C harting_Our_Water_Future_Full_Report_001.pdf. [Accessed on 2 April 2011].
  5. 5. Various water technologies might make drinking water safer and more affordable (1) Household devices (e.g., Hydrologic Ceramic Rabbit Filters, Unilever Pureit, Tata Swach, Sodis) Tablets (e.g., P&G sachets, PSI chlorine tablets) Rainwater harvesting
  6. 6. Various water technologies might make drinking water safer and more affordable (2) Pumping (e.g., Grundfos Lifelink) http://www.grundfoslifelink.com Micro-treatment plant or water kiosks (e.g, Naandi, Trunz, Sarvajal)
  7. 7. © Gettyimages
  8. 8. Business research has to decide on the way we take at the cross-road Business at its cross-road PPP1 Base of the Pyramid (BOP) Population in million > $20,000 Industrialized markets 500 $2,000-$20,000 Emerging ‘mass’ markets 2,000 < $2,000 4,000 1.2 Billion (≈ $ 2000 annum) 1.6 Billion (≈ $ 725 annum) 1.2 Billion (≈ $ 365 annum) 1 – PPP – Purchasing power parity Source Rangan, 2009: Exchange market BOP (Submerge and poverty) market
  9. 9. Why are market creation and business model innovation important to the water sector? BOP market penetration Mobile phones 5 - Maturity Micro-credits Innovating Business model 4 - Scale-up Mobile payment 3 - Success BOP market creation 2 - Survival 1 - Existence Time (or cumulative investments)
  10. 10. Business model thinking inspires profitmaximizing firms Low-cost carrier Razor & blade (inverse) Franchising Pay-per-use
  11. 11. Business model thinking also applies for social-businesses and non-profit firms Financial profit maximization N/A Profit-maximizing businesses Repayment of invested capital (selfsustainability) No recovery of invested capital Non-for-profit organization Social business Social profit maximization Source: Yunus et al (2010)
  12. 12. Do you know these business models? Funding models for nonprofit firms Social business (models) • Member Motivator • Entrepreneur Support Model • Big Bettor • Fee-for-Service Model • Public Provider • Service Subsidization Model • Beneficiary Builder • ... •…
  13. 13. Combining water treatment technologies and business model thinking C) Communities as a beneficiary of micro-water treatment plant D) Entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services A) Low-value devices given away to supplicants for aid Micro-water treatment plants (community filters) B) Selling high-value devices to the financially more viable customers Household devices Non-profit Profit-oriented
  14. 14. Combining water treatment technologies and business model thinking C) Communities as a Micro-water beneficiary of micro-water treatment treatment plant plants (community A) Low-value devices given away to filters) supplicants for aid Project reporting Project execution Proposal Identification Service Distribution Awareness creation Manufacturing R&D Supplicants for aid living close to the poverty line ($500-1000 in PPP) Multiple donors supporting water projects D) Entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services B) Selling high-value devices to the financially more viable customers
  15. 15. Hydrologic in the Cambodian market • Sales comes from bulk sales sand subsidized distribution • Original Tunsai product penetration is 3.5% (after ten 10 years), despite the fact that it was actually given away by NGOs • Experimenting with different distribution models
  16. 16. Combining water treatment technologies and business model thinking C) Communities as a beneficiary of micro-water treatment plant Communities living poverty line ($5001000 in PPP) Manufacturing Operation & maintenance Installation Provider of micro-water treatment plant D) Entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services R&D C) Communities as a Micro-water beneficiary of micro-water treatment plants (community filters) treatment plant Project execution Project reporting Proposal Identification Household devices Multiple donors supporting water projects A) Low-value devices given away to supplicants for aid Non-profit B) Selling high-value devices to the financially more viable customers Profit-oriented
  17. 17. Osho (Oromo Self Help Organization) promoting bone char filters (1) Osho Caretaker Education Bone char production Community-filter installation & transfer Testing fluoride adsorption Bone char exchange Bone char regeneration Operation & maintenance Donor(s) Communities living poverty line ($500-1000 in PPP)
  18. 18. Osho (Oromo Self Help Organization) promoting bone char filters (2) Osho Caretaker Communities living poverty line ($500-1000 in PPP) Education Bone char production Community-filter installation & transfer Testing fluoride adsorption Bone char exchange Bone char Operation & Diversification Diversification regeneration Chlorine tablets Bone dust as chicken feed maintenance Hygiene products Bone chare as fertilizer Grocery sales Cost transparency and Generating and securing reduction payments Donor(s)
  19. 19. Combining water treatment technologies and business model thinking Micro-water treatment plants (community filters) D) Entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services C) Communities as a beneficiary of micro-water treatment plant B) Selling high-value devices to the financially more viable customers A) Low-value devices given away to supplicants for aid Services Sales Distribution Marketing R&D Non-profit Manufacturing Household devices Financially viable customers($ 1’500 5’0000 in PPP)
  20. 20. Hindustian Unilever Pureit
  21. 21. Unilever promoting Pureit water filters R&D Manufacturing Marketing, sales, and distribution Service User-center design to deliver better experience Water filter as an aspirational product Household devices manufactured locally with a standard quality Sales approaches (e.g., community events) Payments (e.g., subsidies, micro-credit, layaway) Trusted, well-educated sales force (e.g., health workers) Promotion through seeding filters within the community Distribution approaches (e.g., retail channels, basket of goods sales) Germ-Kit replacements
  22. 22. Combining water treatment technologies and business model thinking D) Entrepreneurs as franchisees for selling water services Franchisees Communities B) Selling high-value devices to the financially more viable customers Profit-oriented Buying water Water Sales Operation & maintenance Non-profit Building franchisees Household devices Installation A) Low-value devices given away to supplicants for aid Manufacturing C) Communities as a beneficiary of micro-water treatment plant R&D Micro-water treatment plants (community filters) Provider of microwater treatment plant
  23. 23. Business model innovation at sarvajal – affordable, accessible, and pure water Installed water systems Holistic extension of the business model ... Micro-credit institute Bank 4000 Sarvajal (Franchisor) (5000 $ / 2600$) 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 Microentrepreneurs (Franchisees) 1:n 1:m 500 $ (40% of revenue) Communities (Villages – 3’000) 0.12 $ for 20 liters Capabilities: maintaining and monitoring the systems Capabilities Individual skills – bright brains to repetitive gains Routines – Franchisee strategy tool / approach to balance own / borrowed capital 500 0 2008 2010 Source: own interpretation and interviews. Based on Macomber and Sinha (2012) 2012 2014 2016
  24. 24. Equipment
  25. 25. Water shop
  26. 26. Preparingthewaterfortransportation
  27. 27. Transportingthewater
  28. 28. Business model innovation at sarvajal – affordable, accessible, and pure water Installed water systems Holistic extension of the business model ... Micro-credit institute Bank 4000 Sarvajal (Franchisor) (5000 $ / 2600$) 3500 3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 Microentrepreneurs (Franchisees) 1:n 1:m 500 $ (40% of revenue) Communities (Villages – 3’000) 0.12 $ for 20 liters Capabilities: maintaining and monitoring the systems Capabilities Individual skills – bright brains to repetitive gains Routines – Franchisee strategy tool / approach to balance own / borrowed capital 500 0 2008 2010 Source: own interpretation and interviews. Based on Macomber and Sinha (2012) 2012 2014 2016
  29. 29. Conclusion “Experimenting with business models is a small step, one giant leap to make water markets works”

×