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What is Creative Commons? How can it help you understand sharing on the web? How can it help you share your work. Here is a presentation that introduces Creative Commons.

What is Creative Commons? How can it help you understand sharing on the web? How can it help you share your work. Here is a presentation that introduces Creative Commons.

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  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • Finally, there is a “machine-readable” part to the licenses. Machine readability is a crucial aspect for any attribute about objects on the web. This is what makes it possible for Google, Yahoo, or myriad other search and social software products to identify CC-licensed content. Ideally, the licenses should be associated with the so-licensed content with a one-to-one relationship and codified within the html where the content is published. The mark-up standard that makes this all possible is also crucial for any other attributes that we might care to identify for web-based objects, and I will circle back to that since it is a key aspect of ccLearn’s work.
  • You can also embed licenses in XML in a few non-html products, such as Adobe pdfs, Microsoft 2007 objects, and Open Office products. And of course you can always just cut and paste the appropriate text and icons onto your document or resource. If you do the latter, you get all of the legal benefits, but a machine cannot read the legal status, so this is less desirable unless you are not publishing the works on the web.
  • You can also embed licenses in XML in a few non-html products, such as Adobe pdfs, Microsoft 2007 objects, and Open Office products. And of course you can always just cut and paste the appropriate text and icons onto your document or resource. If you do the latter, you get all of the legal benefits, but a machine cannot read the legal status, so this is less desirable unless you are not publishing the works on the web.

Transcript

  • 1. CREATIVE COMMONS & THE FUTURE OF SHARING JEA/NSPA CONFERENCE WASHINGTON, DC NOVEMBER 14, 2009 ESTHER WOJCICKI , CC CHAIR Palo Alto High Journalism
  • 2.
    • CC is a non-profit organization that works to increase the amount of CREATIVE WORKS available for FREE and LEGAL
        • SHARING
        • REPURPOSING
        • MIXING
    CREATIVE COMMONS (CC) WHAT IS IT?
  • 3. Has around 30 employees and hundreds of volunteers around the world in 43 countries. We do not offer legal advice per se. We offer free legal and technical tools that allow creators to publish and share their works on more flexible terms than standard copyright.
  • 4. Why do we need new tools?
    • Digital
    • technologies have
    • revolutionized how
    • creative works are
    • made, distributed,
    • and used
  • 5. WHAT CONSTITUTES CREATIVE WORKS?
    • TEXT
    • IMAGES
    • VIDEOS
    • ART WORK
    • MUSIC
    • ANYTHING CREATIVE
  • 6. Everyday we use Movies Pictures Music Text b Are you ready??? by ssh http://www.flickr.com/photos/ssh/12638218/
  • 7. DID YOU KNOW?
    • Anything you create is by default automatically copyrighted?
    • You do NOT need to file any paperwork
    • It is “All Rights Reserved or
  • 8.
    • COPYRIGHT covers everything you use – textbooks, photos, music, videos, lesson plans.
    • COPYRIGHT covers everything you do – copying, emailing, modifying, sharing with colleagues
    • On the web, TV, radio, in film
    Original text by Creative Commons Australia COPYRIGHT C
  • 9. CRICOS No. 00213J
    • Emailing that book chapter to a friend or colleague?
    • Posting a picture/video/article onto your learning space?
    • Using a cartoon or drawing in a handout?
    • Uploading resources you found to your own web space?
    • Copying a lesson plan and posting it to a educational resource repository?
    b 1Happysnappers( is catching up slowly ) flickr.com/photos/21560098@N06/3636921327/
  • 10. These activities are usually illegal unless you get permission*. * with some exceptions b tvol tvol http://www.flickr.com/photos/sixteenmilesofstring/2596569134/
  • 11.
    • But most people who tell you about copyright focus on restrictions
    Original text by Creative Commons Australia
  • 12. Creative Commons licenses focus on alternatives to “ all rights reserved”
  • 13.
    • Creative Commons means “ Some rights reserved ”
    • That means you still retain ownership but you are MODIFYING your rights
  • 14. The Symbol looks like this
    • Creative Commons
  • 15. Creative Commons provides tools for creators to grant permission ahead of time Original slide by Creative Commons Australia
  • 16. These permissions include the right to copy / distribute , perform , display , build upon , and remix .
  • 17.
    • These tools are for managing your own copyright
    Original slide by Creative Commons Australia b Tooled Flatty by flattop3 www . flickr .com/photos/flattop341/1085739925/ 41
  • 18. So that you can collaborate and share material with anyone . ryanr flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033
  • 19. So how does it work ?
  • 20. Four License Conditions Six Licenses
  • 21.  
  • 22. Mark your website http://creativecommons.org
  • 23. http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Marking Mark your works
  • 24. Some rights reserved
  • 25.
    • Why would students/teachers want to license their work with CC licenses ?
    • To share & collaborate with other students & teachers
    • To get more people to read,see, or hear their work. It will spread quickly on the web. It is like free PR for your work.
  • 26. This is the Creative Commons web site www.creativecommons.org
  • 27. Firefox supports CC searches
    • Creative Commons Search
  • 28. Facts about CC
    • Creative Commons is in 43 countries with 19 additional countries in the process of adopting the licenses .
    • More than 300 million objects are tagged with Creative Commons licenses
  • 29. Open Educational Resources Sharing resources (OER) Here is one important use of CC licensed work on the web
  • 30. Open Educational Resources (OER) are materials, tools, and media used for teaching and learning that are free from copyright restrictions or publicly licensed for anyone to use, adapt, and redistribute.
  • 31.  
  • 32. discovered.creativecommons.org/search Open Education Resource Search Engine
  • 33. opened.creativecommons.org
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36.  
  • 37.  
  • 38.  
  • 39.  
  • 40.  
  • 41. Student Journalism 2.0
    • Is a funded by a MacArthur grant
    • We are looking at student interest in and reaction to CC licenses
    • It would be great to get other schools involved and get feedback from schools around the country .
  • 42. Palo Alto High is one of the schools in the research group
    • The goal is to get student opinion
    • We have class discussions
    • We have set up an option for students to license their work with CC licenses
    • Students are free to use a license or not use one
    • Student reaction is being documented
  • 43.  
  • 44. CC option on http:// voice.paly.net
  • 45. This is what it looks like when a student chooses to use a CC license .
  • 46. Would you like to participate?
    • Student Journalism 2.0 welcomes any school that wants to participate
    • Send us your feedback. What do you students think?
    • You do not need to offer a CC license option
    • If you are interested, email me at esther @creativecommons.org
  • 47. Thank you for your attention! Esther Wojcicki, Creative Commons Palo Alto High Journalism esther @creativecommons.org