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LIS 560 Ditigal Na(t)ives
 

LIS 560 Ditigal Na(t)ives

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Presentation for LIS 560: Instructional and Training Strategies for Information Professionals at the UW iSchool. Health information literacy workshop design for adolescent girls.

Presentation for LIS 560: Instructional and Training Strategies for Information Professionals at the UW iSchool. Health information literacy workshop design for adolescent girls.

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    LIS 560 Ditigal Na(t)ives LIS 560 Ditigal Na(t)ives Presentation Transcript

    • + Mind the Gap: Digital Na(t)ïves and Health Information Literacy Meredith Slota June 5th, 2012 | LIS 560 UW iSchool
    • What?+ Why? Who? How?
    • ✓What?+ Why? Who? How?
    • + Pop Quiz![source: http://www.chow.com/food-news/79610/make-your-own-ice-cream-bars/][source: http://www.pfizerhealthliteracy.com/physicians-providers/NewestVitalSign.aspx]
    • + Newest Vital Sign  PROSE LITERACY:  Clinical example: The patient has scheduled some blood tests and is instructed in writing to fast the night before the tests. The skill needed to follow this instruction is Prose Literacy.  Ice cream label example: The patient needs this skill to read the label and determine if he can eat the ice cream if he is allergic to peanuts.  NUMERACY:  Clinical example: A patient is given a prescription for a new medication that needs to be taken at a certain dosage twice a day. The skill needed to take the medication properly is Numeracy.  Ice cream label example: The patient needs this same skill to calculate how many calories are in a serving of ice cream.  DOCUMENT LITERACY:  Clinical example: The patient is told to buy a glucose meter and use it 30 minutes before each meal and before going to bed. If the number is higher than 200, he should call the office. The skill needed to follow this instruction is Document Literacy.  Ice cream label example: The patient needs this skill to identify the amount of saturated fat in a serving of ice cream and how it will affect his daily diet if he doesn’t eat it.
    • + Health Information Literacy = ??? Science & Culture Critical Thinking Prose Health & Oral Information Literacy Numeracy Documents
    • What?+ ✓Why? Who? How?
    • + Why does Health IL matter?[source: http://ciesin.columbia.edu/docs/001-233/001-233.html]
    • What?+ Why? ✓Who? How?
    • + User group!  They are:  12-18 years old, digital natives  Varied backgrounds, life situations, education  Social animals  Zipf’s case-in-point  They are not:  Digital experts  Information experts  Particularly discerning* about research *Chloe’s niece notwithstanding[source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112697/]
    • + Different Backgrounds[source: http://fabricofmylife.co.uk/2010/01/10/get-ready-for-your-close-up/]
    • + Information Needs  Need: To identify and phrase questions regarding health information effectively  Skill: Familiarity with basic medical and anatomical terminology  Skill: Familiarity with search engines and search functionality (AND/OR, NOT queries)  Need: To identify and evaluate credible sources for health information  Skill: Critical thinking with respect to authority and accuracy of sources  Skill: Using the Internet to find local resources  Skill: Cross-cultural communication to seek sources outside their social comfort zone  Skill: Verifying information using more than one source, getting a second opinion  Need: To interpret and apply new health information in a meaningful way  Skill: Print/oral literacy, reading comprehension  Skill: Numeracy, quantitative analysis  Skill: Critical thinking and problem-solving  Need: Use information to make appropriate decisions regarding health care  Skill: Critical thinking with respect to identifying available options, choices
    • + Information Needs  Need: To identify and phrase questions regarding health information effectively  Skill: Familiarity with basic medical and anatomical terminology  Skill: Familiarity with search engines and search functionality (AND/OR, NOT queries)  Need: To identify and evaluate credible sources for health information  Skill: Critical thinking with respect to authority and accuracy of sources  Skill: Using the Internet to find local resources  Skill: Cross-cultural communication to seek sources outside their social comfort zone  Skill: Verifying information using more than one source, getting a second opinion  Need: To interpret and apply new health information in a meaningful way  Skill: Print/oral literacy, reading comprehension  Skill: Numeracy, quantitative analysis  Skill: Critical thinking and problem-solving  Need: Use information to make appropriate decisions regarding health care  Skill: Critical thinking with respect to identifying available options, choices
    • What?+ Why? Who? ✓How?
    • + Program Design  Pre-survey  Informal setting (after-school programs, Boys and Girls club, YMCA, etc.)  Moveable desks  Internet access + laptops/screen  Four workshops  90 minute sessions  10-12 participants, same throughout  Each workshop follows (loosely) the information literacy cycle  Question  Source  Find  Evaluate  Combine  Share  Apply  (Reflect)  Question [source: http://luciaravieduc8464.wikispaces.com/Home+-+Project+Overview]
    • Get their attention bymaking it relevant!
    • + Workshop 2: Authoritative SourcesTIME CONTENT ASSESSMENT Welcome, ice-breakers (tell us one fun thing and one concerning Instructor gauges engagement from all participants, makes an0:00 – 0:15 thing that you experienced last week), review of last session. effort to give equal speaking time to each participant. Brief mini-lecture about what an authoritative or credible source Participation from all group members, accurate identification of a is, ask participants to describe someone or something they credible source (doctor, parent, .edu or .gov website, etc.),0:15 – 0:25 would consider “credible”. Ask participants why or why not discussion of what makes a source credible. Examples given of what something found on the internet might be believable (pre-test). might hinder credibility (profit, ignorance, etc.). Searching pop quiz: given a question from last week with a Active participation, collective group work. Adequately puts into “known” answer, have half the class search for what might be practice searching techniques learned in previous workshop, such0:25 – 0:35 the “true” answer with a credible source, and have the other half as complex search strings (using “and” or “not” instead of just key search for a source that gives a different or incorrect answer. words) and filtering. Multiple sources in each category. Spend five minutes on each of four sources: two deemed Each group needs to send smaller groups to the front of the class to credible and two deemed less so or outright untrue. Ask argue their source, why or why not. Again, participation and results0:35 – 0:55 participants why or why not these sources are credible, and how are assessed. could we judge them if we did not already “know” the answer? Collectively brainstorm two lists that can be used in the future to Require two responses from each participant, if possible. Lists help us evaluate sources to determine their credibility. One list should have five items each.0:55 – 0:65 should be clues that a source is reliable; the other list should be clues that a source is unreliable. Ask again why these internet sources might not be reliable (post- Assess whether responses in the group have changed from pre-to-0:65 – 0:70 test). Did we learn anything from this discussion? post test. D.I.Y. time: instruct students to find a credible resource that Participants actively engage in D.I.Y. time and find their own0:70 – 0:80 could help them deal with the concerning thing they experienced results. this week. Group members share their search results with the group and try Assess confidence in search and presentation as well as application0:80 – 0:90 to assess whether the information they found would be useful in of resource to issue. Ask students to contact you privately if they helping them deal with their concerning thing they experienced. need more help (and assure discretion). Time permitting, allow 1:1 consultations to help participants find Assess participation and success with searches to see if group0:90 – end extra resources, and/or play a game to see who can find the members can successfully apply their new skills to go above and “best” (i.e. worst) website that lacks credibility. beyond the class curriculum.
    • + Weigh the Evidence…[source: http://www.malepregnancy.com/][source: http://www.definenormal.com/PregnantMan/Home.html]
    • + Don’t Always Trust Google…
    • + Don’t Always Trust Google…
    • + Check Your Sources… (Hint: Not Yahoo! Answers)[source: http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2007/12/a_librarians_worst_nightmare.html][source: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2011/02/teenage-patients-answering-medical-questions-yahoo-answers.html]
    • + Assessment: Program and Participants
    • + Thank You! Meredith Slota June 5th, 2012 | LIS 560 slota@uw.edu