Connect and Inspire: Finding the path to 21st century learning

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Our learners are involved in an “architecture of participation”, creating, adapting and sharing content. Are you? How will you build capacity in your school to deliver 21st century learning? Although the vision is global, the path to 21st Century education requires a local journey, one that recognizes and responds to specific challenges and opportunities. This new multimodal paradigm for learning means that ‘how we teach becomes what we teach’ – every day!

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  • I love your work.

    Azlan
    www.freepolyphonicringtones.org/
    www.free-nokia-ringtones.net/
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  • Nice presentation!
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  • Thanks, judy for sharing this inspirational slide with us!
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  • This slide show is very informative. I like it. Brilliantly done!!! Thank you very much and congrats!
    Mandy Barbosa - Marikina City, Philippines
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  • what does our digital learning world encompass? It began in the 90s with the world wide web. Web 1.0, passive and non-interactive. ICT was master learning, fixed information processes.
  • But larger percentages of older generations are online now than in the past, and they are doing more activities online.
  • used wikipedia! know what a blog or wiki is! have a facebook profile!Tools like delicious, flickr, google docs, evernote, tumblr,
  • Kids do mashup! Now we are no longer talking about new and improved ICT (and skills to match). Students are not easily satisfied by “doing it for the teacher”
  • WHY
  • WHY
  • So many options!! If we have all this information to show us what 21st century learning has to consider, how then do we find the path? what do the components look like?
  • futurist, known for his works discussing the digital & communications revolution, provides a quote that shows what powers my changing professional role and modes of engagement.
  • Offered a new freedom to communicate and provided a growing usefulness in ‘searching’ for information that could be pumped directly into assessments and essays The old internet was based on drill and skill - now it’s a communication channel, and teachers need to learn how to participate in the learning conversation.
  • Learning is a multimodal conversation - the issues we debate relate to the everyday artifacts as vital as that telephone but represent much more in terms of connections and ‘who we are’. Northern Beaches Christian School - 3D explorations. “student’s secret room”
  • what turns you on? what drives your professional practices? what will drive 21C in your school. not about technology integration any more - its about digital citizenship and digital identity and managers of information and knowledge.
  • It took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after speech, thousands more before the printing press was invented, and a few hundred more for the telegraph to arrive. Today, new ways of relating are constantly created and a new communication medium emerges every time someone creates a web application—
  • Nothing good will come of these technologies if we do not first confront the crisis of significance and bring relevance back into education. In some ways these technologies act as magnifiers. If we fail to address the crisis of significance, the technologies will only magnify the problem by allowing students to tune out more easily and completely.
  • Unfortunately, many teachers only see the disruptive possibilities of these technologies when they find students Facebooking, texting, IMing, or shopping during class. Though many blame the technology, these activities are just new ways for students to tune out, part of the much bigger problem
  • Demonstrate the digital connection shifts in the space of four years!!
  • There is a new concept of both privacy and community. \"In many ways this brings us back to a pre-modern, little village dynamic,\" he said. \"That idea that you are surrounded by people that know what you are up to and care to stay in touch with you, even if those people are now spread across the planet.\"
  • Wikipedia has taught us yet another lesson, that a networked information environment allows people to work together in new ways to create information that can rival (and even surpass) the content of experts by almost any measure. Students: blogs, wikis, social networks, instant messaging is social in nature. Because of this, social media reflects not just information, but the values, ideologies, beliefs, ways of behaving and a range of digital-identities.
  • This culture of discussion and participation is now available on any website with the emerging “second layer” of the web through applications like Diigo which allow you to add notes and tags to any website - as we note and tag these sites, we are also collectively organizing them, so that the notion that this new media environment is too big and disorganized for anybody to find anything worthwhile & relevant is simply not the case. hyper-personalized digital network -information can find us.
  • We have had our why's, how's, and what's upside-down, - as infinite information shifts us away from a narrow focus on information, we begin to recognize the importance of the form of learning over the content of learning. It isn't that content is not important; it is simply that it must not take precedence over form.
  • Crisis puts a new face on social networking and the flow of shared information and media.
  • The bushfires in Victoria also tested the usefulness and relevance of the social media. As the bushfires multiplied to destroy towns, homes and lives, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, MySpace and other social networking sites reacted. SMH February 11, 2009 - 12:00AM
  • The adoption of new media taps our students hunger for technology integration. Their passion for collaborative, creative deep learning with Web 2.0 will emerge and adapt as their academic, technology and social activities intermingle. We want our students to be involved in co- construction of their knowledge development. A a mediating tool that makes visible the organization of the social, collaborative, academic aspects of what, where and how they learn.
  • Unlike any other time in history, our ability to connect with others to collaborate and share information will determine the nature and quality of our learning and our interaction with new knowledge. Who I connect with, when I connect, and how I connect will determine how I learn and what use I make of the information that I am working with. We now have a information ecology that is an open, self-managed, fostered, and conducive to knowledge flow between content and connections.
  • Our capacity to 'connect' will strengthen or weaken depending on our social network awareness and our capacity to use newmedia to harness and organize information. Educators who understand this know that to be good mentors in the 21st century learning landscape is to use the power of personal learning networks and Web 2.0 tools to empower information seeking and knowledge creation. BE 21C
  • If we have all this information to show us what 21st century learning has to consider, how then do we find the path?
  • charts the landscape of emerging technologies for teaching, learning and creative expression. Generate a list of technologies, trends, challenges, and issues that knowledgeable people in technology industries, higher education, and museums are thinking about.
  • The Horizon Project and the annual Horizon Reports are providing us with the information we need to stay informed and in touch with the waves of change. The newer Horizon K12 reports highlight the importance of these changes in understanding our teaching environment in schools. It is no longer feasible for anyone to be fully conversant with every Internet technology.
  • Since 2004: The Horizon Project and the annual Horizon Reports are providing us with the information we need to stay informed and in touch with the waves of change. The newer Horizon K12 reports highlight the importance of these changes in understanding our teaching environment in schools.
  • this is why we bother - because in a 21c environment we have the capacity to inspire out students - just as we always have done.
  • Repackage 21C learning - new media immersive learning environments
  • Our kids are different - so what changes are we going to make?
  • The teaching that we do needs to encompass up-to-date 21st century digital literacy frameworks; be marked by collaboration and participation; promote good behaviours in personal identity and digital citizenship online; and be absorbed with pedagogical change and innovation inspired by Web 2.0. Re-engineer classrroms and school libraries - wherever learning takes place in whatever new spaces and places these are available.
  • Now we have the era of online connections where seeking meaning incorporates a capacity for awareness, connection, and recombination in formal and informal spaces. Learning now is more than working in subject disciplines as an object of schooling. Unlike any other time in history, our ability to connect with others to collaborate and share information will determine the nature and quality of our learning and our interaction with new knowledge.
  • Kansas State University - turned his attention to the effects of social media and digital technology on global society. His videos on technology, education, and information have been viewed by millions, translated in over ten languages, feature in international film festivals and major academic conferences worldwide.
  • If 'knowing' is to be connected, then in order to better understand learning we need to better understand how and why those connections form. Educators who understand this know that to be good mentors in the 21st century learning landscape is to use the power of personal learning networks and new media.
  • 21st century classrooms can be recognized by their \"pedagogy of participation\". Learning comes before the software tools and the learning environment is more influential than the hardware used. Students are actively engaged in using technology as a tool rather than passively receiving information from technology. Students use technology to collaborate with others rather than working individually at all times. They build understanding rather than simply receive information. Students use technology tools to solve problems meaningful to them rather than working on artificial assignments. Students use technology tools to set goals, monitor progress and evaluate their learning reflectively. Students and teachers can harness the capabilities of Web 2.0 to access the power of worldwide communities at any time, in any place, for inspiration, ideas, mentoring - drawing on the knowledge of peers, friends, professional colleagues and external experts as needed. Our ability to not only read information, but to create, discuss, share and collaborate using simple online tools has transformed the way people connect, organize and share information at almost no cost.
  • Rethinking our learning frameworks is central to improving digital literacy and ensuring that schooling meets the demands of 21C learning. Along with the information revolution, we have the social revolution of new media which has created new relationships and new forms of discourse. Because of this reading and writing will never be the same. Teaching is changing too.
  • choose your tools
  • choose your tools
  • choose your digital pedagogy. Andrew Churches - DIGITAL TAXONOMY
  • I don’t think you can do it any other way, whether its’ blogging, wiki, podcasting, voicethreads, google docs, etc the point is to NOT do ‘tools’ but to rethink interactive pedagogy and understand why.
  • last year we began to dabble, then we joined the PLP project to spearhead change driven by new media vs interactive technology integration. We experimented. Wiimote. We tested ideas out ‘on the fly’ integrated into the curriculum. We communicated, online, we collaborated online. We determined what we wanted to try in 2009. Teachers are encouraged to experiment.
  • For example, if we are teaching collaboration, the tool must allow students to collaborate in their educational setting. What works in an elementary school in Kansas, may not work in a school in Adelaide.
  • Powerful Learning Practice - events, Ning, local journey, and the enthusiasm of the cohort journey
  • tools are: delicious, flickr, google docs, blogs, wiki, (and google chat) Key project is Year 7 Ning + glogster experimentation at every opportunity -
  • Who I connect with, when I connect, and how I connect will determine how I learn and what use I make of the information that I am working with. We now have a information ecology that is an open, self-managed, fostered, and conducive to knowledge flow between content and connections. Where will you start?
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