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My Horse University and eXtension’sHorseQuestwelcome you to this live Webcast.<br />Tips for Protecting Your Barn and Hors...
Meet our presenter:<br />Dr. Betsy Greene<br />University of Vermont<br />
Overview<br />Diseases<br />Handling Animals<br />Issues<br />Remedies<br />Prevention<br />Resources  <br />
What are we worried about?<br />Level of Risk<br />Zoonotic<br />Kindergarten<br />Life Threatening<br />
Zoonotic: Animal to Human Transmission<br />How Bad is it Doc?!<br />Ringworm<br />Rabies<br />Rain Rot<br />Vesicular Sto...
Zoonotic: YESHorse to Human? (no)<br />West Nile<br />Eastern Equine Encephalitis<br />Western EE<br />Mosquitoes bite!<br...
ZoonoticTransmission<br />Direct<br />Eat, Breath, Skin Contact, Mucous Membrane/Open Wounds<br />Indirect<br />Insect Vec...
Repro Related<br />Contagious Equine Metritis<br />Equine Viral Arteritis<br />
Other Diseases<br />Equine Herpes Virus<br />Equine Infectious Anemia<br />West Nile Virus<br />Influenza<br />Strangles<b...
2010: MI = 56<br />
The Importance of Biosecurity<br />Practices and procedures that reduce the risk of infectious disease.<br />Benefits<br /...
Tools for Promoting Biosecurity in Vermont’s Equine Community<br />The development and implementation of a user-friendly b...
Layout<br />Sections<br />Evaluation, Protocol for Equine, Protocol for Visitors, Wildlife Control, Reference of Infectiou...
Evaluating Your Current Practices<br />Every horse facility is unique – effective biosecurity plans should be tailored to ...
Protocol for Equine<br />Day-to-day routine<br />Manure handling<br />Medical Care<br />New additions <br />On the road <b...
  Disinfecting your   	farm
  The Disinfecting 	Process
  What you Use…</li></li></ul><li>Day-to-Day Routine<br />Establish sanitation standards<br />Check feed storage bins regu...
Manure Handling<br />Stock-piling<br />Pollution concerns, Accepted Agriculture Practices<br />Spreading<br />Requires pro...
Medical Care<br />Quarantine<br />House/group horses by need and physiological state.<br />Establish a vaccination routine...
New Additions to the Barn<br />Quarantine<br />New animals should always be quarantined for at least 3 weeks and closely m...
Handling the Sick Horse(s)<br />Human Behaviors/Practices<br />Separate tools/equipment<br />Housing/paddocks/water trough...
On the road…and back again<br />Pre-travel<br />Check your horse prior to travel, don’t transport a sick animal.<br />Make...
Transportation<br />Keep your trailer clean<br />Clean and disinfect after each use<br />Don’t forget the wheels!<br />Ple...
Disinfecting Your Farm<br />Disinfectants work best on clean surfaces<br />Make sure disinfectant is horse-safe<br />Follo...
The Disinfecting Process<br /> Remove everything from stall<br /> Sweep out as much debris as possible<br /> Wash walls an...
Disinfectant Guide<br />
People Guidelines<br />Controlled entry<br />Clearly marked, central entrance/exit controls traffic flow<br />Visitor log<...
Maintain parking area away from manure and feed lanes
Hand/Boot Washing
Locate near exit
Staff
Present and available for questions
Dogs
Either disallow or have strict guidelines</li></li></ul><li>Visitor Levels<br />Low Risk<br />Do not own horses and rarely...
General Guidelines<br />Store feed in tightly closed, durable containers<br />Protect your water source<br />Use proper ga...
Welcome Wildlife<br />Raptors<br />Snakes?<br />Fish & Frogs<br />Know “safe” behaviors<br />The threat posed by wildlife ...
Rodent Control<br />Rodent colonies can eat over a ton of feed per year and spoil ten times that amount!<br />USDA reports...
Rodent - Prevention<br />Store feed in rodent-proof containers<br />Keep garbage covered<br />Eliminate holes in buildings...
Rodent - Response<br />The pros and cons of cats<br />Poisons<br />Traps<br />Fumigation<br />Electric Rodent Control<br /...
Bird Control<br />Carriers of West Nile virus and many types of bacteria.<br />Nests built too close to lights can cause f...
Bird - Prevention<br />Bird-proof feed and garbage containers<br />Keep manure and compost piles covered<br />Birds are dr...
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Protecting Your Barn and Horses from Disease (Greene)

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Do you know the most likely ways that your horse may be exposed to disease? How can you decrease your horse’s chance of infection in case of an outbreak? How do you care for, handle or clean up after a sick horse has been identified? This Webinar will give practical evaluation methods and advice for prevention, protection, and proactive ways of minimizing disease risk in your horse facility.

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  • CEM: A transmissible, exotic, venereal disease of horses caused by the bacterium Taylorellaequigenitalis. Thoroughbred horses appear to be more severely affected by the disease than other breeds. Because animals may be asymptomatic, the disease is difficult to detect and control. EVA is caused by arterivirus. Clinical signs include fever, respiratory problems, severe coughing and the accumulation of fluid in the body. The virus is transmitted by secretions from infected animals. Control measures are primarily aimed at stallions because they spread the disease via semen.
  • Equine Rhinopneumonitis virus or EHV is a highly infectious viral disease. The virus can survive for 14 to 45 days in the environment and is spread via the respiratory tract or from aborted fetuses, membranes and fluid. Infected foals can also pass the infection onto healthy mares in their group via their respiratory systems. EIA is a viral disease of members of the horse family. There is no vaccine or treatment for the disease. It is often difficult to differentiate from other fever-producing diseases, including anthrax, influenza, and equine encephalitis. West Nile Virus is spread by infected mosquitoes, and can cause serious, life-altering and even fatal disease. Virus transmission may occur in parts of the country where mosquitoes are still active.
  • Transcript of "Protecting Your Barn and Horses from Disease (Greene)"

    1. 1. My Horse University and eXtension’sHorseQuestwelcome you to this live Webcast.<br />Tips for Protecting Your Barn and Horses From Disease<br />Dr. Betsy Greene<br />University of Vermont<br />
    2. 2. Meet our presenter:<br />Dr. Betsy Greene<br />University of Vermont<br />
    3. 3. Overview<br />Diseases<br />Handling Animals<br />Issues<br />Remedies<br />Prevention<br />Resources  <br />
    4. 4. What are we worried about?<br />Level of Risk<br />Zoonotic<br />Kindergarten<br />Life Threatening<br />
    5. 5. Zoonotic: Animal to Human Transmission<br />How Bad is it Doc?!<br />Ringworm<br />Rabies<br />Rain Rot<br />Vesicular Stomatitis<br />Others <br />Salmonellosis, Brucellosis, Lepto, Crypto, Anthrax<br />
    6. 6. Zoonotic: YESHorse to Human? (no)<br />West Nile<br />Eastern Equine Encephalitis<br />Western EE<br />Mosquitoes bite!<br />Birds, then humans or horses…<br />
    7. 7. ZoonoticTransmission<br />Direct<br />Eat, Breath, Skin Contact, Mucous Membrane/Open Wounds<br />Indirect<br />Insect Vector or Fomite<br />
    8. 8. Repro Related<br />Contagious Equine Metritis<br />Equine Viral Arteritis<br />
    9. 9. Other Diseases<br />Equine Herpes Virus<br />Equine Infectious Anemia<br />West Nile Virus<br />Influenza<br />Strangles<br />EEE/VEE/WEE<br />
    10. 10. 2010: MI = 56<br />
    11. 11. The Importance of Biosecurity<br />Practices and procedures that reduce the risk of infectious disease.<br />Benefits<br />Healthier horses<br />Fewer vet bills<br />Client and employee safety<br />Environmentally sound<br />The bottom line = prevention<br />
    12. 12. Tools for Promoting Biosecurity in Vermont’s Equine Community<br />The development and implementation of a user-friendly biosecurity protocol for equine facilities will reduce the risk of infectious disease and environmental contamination by educating horse owners on proper procedures and protocols.<br />CDROM<br />
    13. 13. Layout<br />Sections<br />Evaluation, Protocol for Equine, Protocol for Visitors, Wildlife Control, Reference of Infectious Disease, Emergency Contact Info.<br />Quick Views<br />Summary Surveys<br />Resources & Additional Information<br />
    14. 14. Evaluating Your Current Practices<br />Every horse facility is unique – effective biosecurity plans should be tailored to your needs.<br />Evaluation included to help you categorize your facility and the areas in which you need improvement.<br />
    15. 15. Protocol for Equine<br />Day-to-day routine<br />Manure handling<br />Medical Care<br />New additions <br />On the road <br /><ul><li> Transportation
    16. 16. Disinfecting your farm
    17. 17. The Disinfecting Process
    18. 18. What you Use…</li></li></ul><li>Day-to-Day Routine<br />Establish sanitation standards<br />Check feed storage bins regularly<br />Eliminate standing water<br />Refresh water buckets every 24 hours<br />Sharing equipment<br />If shared between horses, clean between uses<br />Establish a cleaning routine<br />Disinfect once a month<br />Disinfect if there is a change in the horse’s status<br />
    19. 19. Manure Handling<br />Stock-piling<br />Pollution concerns, Accepted Agriculture Practices<br />Spreading<br />Requires proper amount of land area<br />Prohibited in VT from Dec 15th to April 1st<br />Selling<br />Composting<br />Most biosecure method<br />Kills pathogens, low maintenance, volume reduction, desirable product<br />
    20. 20. Medical Care<br />Quarantine<br />House/group horses by need and physiological state.<br />Establish a vaccination routine. Take into account:<br />Area<br />Time of year<br />Activity/use level of horses<br />AAEP guidelines available online<br />
    21. 21. New Additions to the Barn<br />Quarantine<br />New animals should always be quarantined for at least 3 weeks and closely monitored during this time.<br />History<br />Know the animal’s history/buy from reputable seller.<br />Exam<br />Have a vet check the new animal at the first sign of a problem.<br />
    22. 22. Handling the Sick Horse(s)<br />Human Behaviors/Practices<br />Separate tools/equipment<br />Housing/paddocks/water troughs<br />Treat/Care for Last (Vet included…)<br />Change/Disinfect Clothing/Footwear<br />The happy birthday song….washing hands<br />Other tips/protocols…<br />
    23. 23. On the road…and back again<br />Pre-travel<br />Check your horse prior to travel, don’t transport a sick animal.<br />Make sure vaccines are current for diseases spread at shows<br />Stay Separate<br />If possible, do not house your horses with other animals or in unsanitary conditions.<br />Don’t Share Germs<br />Do not allow your horse to use shared water or feed buckets<br />Equipment<br />Bring your own equipment<br />
    24. 24. Transportation<br />Keep your trailer clean<br />Clean and disinfect after each use<br />Don’t forget the wheels!<br />Pleuropneumonia (Shipping Fever)<br />If horses cannot properly lower their head for a long period of time, bacteria can collect in the air passages and cause infection.<br />
    25. 25. Disinfecting Your Farm<br />Disinfectants work best on clean surfaces<br />Make sure disinfectant is horse-safe<br />Follow labeled instructions for use<br />NEVER mix chemicals<br />Can create toxic gases, cause fires, or become more toxic to people<br />
    26. 26. The Disinfecting Process<br /> Remove everything from stall<br /> Sweep out as much debris as possible<br /> Wash walls and floor with detergent or other cleaning agent. Rinse and allow to dry.<br /> Apply the disinfectant following labeled instructions. Do not rinse!<br />Note: surfaces such as clay, dirt, and other porous substances cannot be adequately cleaned. Lye and thick bedding can help.<br />
    27. 27. Disinfectant Guide<br />
    28. 28. People Guidelines<br />Controlled entry<br />Clearly marked, central entrance/exit controls traffic flow<br />Visitor log<br />Keeps record of visitation<br />Signs<br />Make sure off-limits areas are clearly marked and enforced<br /><ul><li>Parking
    29. 29. Maintain parking area away from manure and feed lanes
    30. 30. Hand/Boot Washing
    31. 31. Locate near exit
    32. 32. Staff
    33. 33. Present and available for questions
    34. 34. Dogs
    35. 35. Either disallow or have strict guidelines</li></li></ul><li>Visitor Levels<br />Low Risk<br />Do not own horses and rarely visit farms<br />Clean outerwear and footwear, hand-washing<br />Example: school field trip<br />Medium Risk<br />Make regular visits to farms but don’t have contact with horses<br />Feed delivery personnel, repairmen<br />High Risk<br />Make regular trips to horse farms and have close contact with animals<br />Vets, farriers, inseminators, trainers, international visitors<br />
    36. 36. General Guidelines<br />Store feed in tightly closed, durable containers<br />Protect your water source<br />Use proper garbage disposal<br />Feed pets indoors<br />Keep work and storage areas clean<br />Cut down on weeds<br />The sooner you spot a problem, the less chance a disease can spread to your horses<br />
    37. 37. Welcome Wildlife<br />Raptors<br />Snakes?<br />Fish & Frogs<br />Know “safe” behaviors<br />The threat posed by wildlife species can sometimes be judged by behavior.<br />
    38. 38. Rodent Control<br />Rodent colonies can eat over a ton of feed per year and spoil ten times that amount!<br />USDA reports that more than $2 billion in feed is destroyed by rodents every year<br />Rodents can cause damage to buildings and can cause fires<br />Notorious carriers of bacteria, lices, mites, ticks, fleas, and intestinal parasites.<br />Prevention is key!<br />
    39. 39. Rodent - Prevention<br />Store feed in rodent-proof containers<br />Keep garbage covered<br />Eliminate holes in buildings larger than ¼ inch<br />Trim weeds and long grass near buildings<br />Remove decaying wood from your property<br />Keep gutters clean and free of debris<br />Avoid clutter!<br />
    40. 40. Rodent - Response<br />The pros and cons of cats<br />Poisons<br />Traps<br />Fumigation<br />Electric Rodent Control<br />Sanitation, repair, and regular cleaning practices can prevent disease, loss of feed, and structural damage<br />
    41. 41. Bird Control<br />Carriers of West Nile virus and many types of bacteria.<br />Nests built too close to lights can cause fires.<br />It’s easier to prevent bird infestations than to deal with an over-population.<br />
    42. 42. Bird - Prevention<br />Bird-proof feed and garbage containers<br />Keep manure and compost piles covered<br />Birds are drawn to an easy food source. Uncovered feed bins, spilled hay and grain, and open garbage containers are invitations to birds.<br />
    43. 43. Bird - Response<br />Netting<br />Noisemakers<br />Visual Repellents<br />Poison<br />Natural Enemies<br />
    44. 44. Insect Control<br />Carriers for diseases such as West Nile Virus, Equine Infectious Anemia, and Potomac Horse Fever.<br />Breed especially well in wet areas and during summer months.<br />
    45. 45. Insect - Prevention<br />Store feed in insect-proof containers<br />Sanitize<br />Cover manure and compost piles<br />Clean up spills<br />Keep it dry<br />Clean feed buckets<br />Landscape planning<br />
    46. 46. Insect - Response<br />Feed additives<br />Screens<br />Insect tape<br />Sprays<br />Natural sprays<br />Landscaping solutions<br />Ponds<br />
    47. 47. Resources<br />Biosecurity CD (asci.uvm.edu/equine)<br />APHIS (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/horses/)<br />AAEP (http://www.aaep.org/)<br />State Veterinarian<br />Your Vet<br />
    48. 48. Give us your feedback!<br />You will receive a survey by email in 1-2 days. Please take a few minutes to give us your feedback on this webcast. It will help us to better serve you!<br />
    49. 49. Upcoming Webcasts<br />Gastric UlcersMarch 22, 20117PM EDT<br />
    50. 50. Thank you for attending this live web presentation!<br />For more information about <br />My Horse University please visit us at:<br />www.myhorseuniversity.com<br />info@myhorseuniversity.com | www.myhorseuniversity.com | 517-353-3123<br />
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