Living in a Media World

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These slides accompany a lecture in Mass Media at Montana Tech. Textbook is Hanson's "Mass Media."

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  • Levels of Communication. When we log onto Facebook, we are engaging in almost every possible level of communication. One might use it to plan social events, talk with parents and professors, drops hints to parents about prezzies, What else? Check your status to see if there are comments. Responses to wall pasts, soccer discussion groups. Newsfeed to see what people are up to. Change your own status. Before we try to analyse the levels of communication we need to define communication.
  • Communication takes place at a number of levels, including intrapersonal (within the self). This is how we think and how we assign meaning to all the messages and events that surround our lives. interpersonal (between individuals), This can be a conversation with a friend (words) or a hug for your mom to tell her you love her. Does it need to be face to face? Phone call, IM, email, greeting card – personal message over facebook. group (between three or more individuals), Might be a dinner or a coach with a team or a huge lecture hall where each person has opportunity to respond but is unlikely to do so. Facebook? Status update. and mass (between a single sender and a large audience). Mass communication is a communication process that covers an entire society, in which an individual or institution uses technology to send messages to a large, mixed audience, most of whose members are not known to the sender. Mass communication can be examined in terms of the process of transmission; the rituals surrounding its consumption; the attention messages draw to persons, groups, or concepts; or how audience members create meaning out of media content.
  • Traditionally mass comm has allowed only limited feedback but opportunity is growing rapidly. Examples? Mix of Levels. Can you think of where levels can cross over?
  • Traditionally mass comm has allowed only limited feedback but opportunity is growing rapidly. Examples? Mix of Levels. Can you think of where levels can cross over?
  • Living in a Media World

    1. 1. Mass Media Communication Montana Tech TC 2146 Living in a Media World
    2. 2. Resource Manual: Ralph E. Hanson’s Mass Communication: Living in a Media World
    3. 3. Michael Jackson Case Study <ul><li>Reinforces the fact that we do not need to rely entirely on conventional media to engage in various levels of media communication. </li></ul><ul><li>News of Jackson’s death was first reported by TMZ.com. (see page 3-4) </li></ul>
    4. 4. What is Communication? <ul><li>Communication is “social interaction through messages.” (George Gerber) </li></ul><ul><li>Communication is how we socially interact at a number of levels through messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Importantly, communication is a PROCESS not a static thing. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Types of Communication <ul><li>Intrapersonal Communication: Communication you have with yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Interpersonal Communication: Communication between two people </li></ul><ul><li>Group Communication: Communication where one person is communicating with an audience of two or more people </li></ul><ul><li>Mass Communication </li></ul>
    6. 6. What is Mass Communication? <ul><li>When an individual or institution uses technology: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To send messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To a large, mixed audience, separated by space and possibly time -- most of whose members are not known to the sender. </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Feedback <ul><li>Traditionally mass communication has allowed only limited feedback but opportunity is growing rapidly. Examples? </li></ul><ul><li>Mix of Levels. Can you think of where levels can cross over? </li></ul>
    8. 8. Players in Mass Communication <ul><li>Sender The corporation or individual responsible for the message being sent. </li></ul><ul><li>Message The content being transmitted by the sender to the receiver. </li></ul><ul><li>Channel The medium used to transmit the message. </li></ul><ul><li>Receiver The audience for the mass communication message. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Mass Communication Models <ul><ul><li>Transmission Model (SMCR) A dated model useful for identifying players in the mass communication process. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ritual Model Media use is an interactive ritual by audience members. Looks at how and why audiences consume messages. </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Mass Communication Models <ul><ul><li>Publicity Model Looks at how media attention makes a person, concept, or thing important. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reception Model Looks at how audience members derive and create meaning out of media content. </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Evolution of the Media World <ul><li>1100-1400 AD: Pre-mass media communication networks </li></ul><ul><li>1450s: Development of movable type, printing </li></ul><ul><li>1814: Steam-powered printing press </li></ul><ul><li>1844: First U.S. telegraph line </li></ul><ul><li>1866: First trans-Atlantic telegraph line </li></ul>
    12. 12. Evolution of the Media World <ul><li>1880s: Invention of the gramophone </li></ul><ul><li>Late 1800s: Development of radio </li></ul><ul><li>1890s: Development of motion pictures </li></ul><ul><li>1939: First television broadcasts </li></ul><ul><li>1990s: Internet becomes a channel of mass communication </li></ul>
    13. 13. Media Literacy <ul><li>Audience members’ understanding of: </li></ul><ul><li>The media industry’s operation </li></ul><ul><li>The messages delivered by the media </li></ul><ul><li>The roles media play in society </li></ul><ul><li>How audience members respond to these media and their messages </li></ul>
    14. 14. Basic Dimensions of Media Literacy <ul><li>Cognitive Dimension Ability to intellectually process information communicated by the media. </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional Dimension Understanding the feelings created by media messages. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Basic Dimensions of Media Literacy <ul><li>Aesthetic Dimension Interpreting media content from an artistic or critical point of view. </li></ul><ul><li>Moral Dimension Understanding the values of the medium or the message. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Seven Truths “They” Don’t Want You To Know About the Media <ul><li>Truth One: The media are essential components of our lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Truth Two: There are no mainstream media (MSM). </li></ul><ul><li>Truth Three: Everything from the margin moves to the center. </li></ul><ul><li>Truth Four: Nothing’s new: Everything that happened in the past will happen again. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Seven Truths “They” Don’t Want You To Know About the Media <ul><li>Truth Five: New media are always scary. </li></ul><ul><li>Truth Six: Activism and analysis are not the same thing. </li></ul><ul><li>Truth Seven: There is no “they.” </li></ul>

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