Cyberbullying
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  • Stop Bullying. (2011, May 9). Webisode 5: KB recalls her day (video). Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.stopbullying.gov/videos/2011/05/webisode-5-kb-recalls.html#playlist=p1174
  • Cyberbullying Research Center. (2012). Facts about cyberbullying quiz. Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.cyberbullying.us/quiz.php?QUIZNUM=1
  • Cyberbullying Research Center. (2012). Facts about cyberbullying quiz. Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.cyberbullying.us/quiz.php?QUIZNUM=1
  • H.B. 283; Tex. Educ. Code Ann 25.0342, 37.217, 37.001, 37.083; http://www.legis.state.tx.us/tlodocs/82R/billtext/pdf/HB01942F.pdf#navpanes=0 http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/ED/pdf/ED.37.pdf
  • Brain Pop. (2012). Cyberbullying (video). Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.brainpop.com/technology/computersandinternet/cyberbullying/On Guard Online. (n.d.). Stand up to cyberbullying (video). Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://onguardonline.gov/media/video-0005-stand-cyberbullyingFull movie of Cyberbully: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Id5eMH9hyMY&feature=fvwrel

Transcript

  • 1. Cyberbullying By: Marisol Herrera
  • 2. Technology Usage  The prevalence rates of technology usage among school children continues to climb:  Over 90% of youths use the Internet (Wong-Lo & Bullock, 2011).  Over 80% of teens use a cell phone regularly (Bullying Statistics, 2009).  Teens between the ages of 13-17 average 1,742 text messages each month (Gurian, n.d.).
  • 3. Raises a Big Question Are there any dangers with such usage?
  • 4. Dangers  The answer is yes. There are many dangers.  Even though technology has its many benefits and uses, if used improperly, it could cause some drastic consequences.  One misusage that will be discussed throughout this presentation is: CYBERBULLYING
  • 5. Video KB Recalls Her Day (Stop Bullying, 2011).
  • 6. Cyberbullying  Due to the continuous climb of technological advances in online and electronic communication and its heightened accessibility to the world, the typical school yard bully has found a new way and school yard to torment its vulnerable victims: this new avenue is the cyber world.
  • 7. Bullying in the 21st Century
  • 8. About Cyberbullying  A little over a decade ago, the term “cyberbullying” did not even exist nor was it a problem. Now it has taken traditional bullying by storm and has revolutionized it to a greater degree that it is now so widespread and pervasive that it has NO boundaries or limits.
  • 9. Definition of Cyberbullying  Cyberbullying is defined as an individual or group of people that intentionally and repeatedly inflict harm on another person through electronic forms of communication to the point where the victim feels harassed or unsafe (Mason, 2008; Miller & Hufstedler, 2009).
  • 10. Technology Used in Cyberbullying  Cyberbullying harassment includes the following uses of technology for the purpose to deliberately antagonize the victim:  Social networks (Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc.)  Mobile phone texting  Videos  Picture messages  Instant messages  Emails  Chat rooms  Blogs  Phone calls
  • 11. Intent of Cyberbullying  The intent of cyberbullying is to tease, taunt, name call, embarrass, humiliate, threaten, and spread defamatory lies and libelous rumors to ruin the cybervictim‟s reputation (Miller & Hufstedler, 2009).
  • 12. Its Pervasive Nature Traditional Bullying  Not many know it is being done and only a few witness it  Usually done by one bully or a small group of bullies  Lasts for short periods of time each day and the victim can usually escape once at home Cyberbullying  Worldwide audience that knows and is watching it being done  Is initiated by one bully and then many others join in to participate  In a matter of seconds, it can reach a multitude. 24/7 - attacked, home is no longer a sanctuary
  • 13. Examples of Cyberbullying  Sending mean messages or threats through email or cell phone  Posting hurtful messages on social networks or web pages  Spreading rumors online or through texts  Posting embarrassing photos or secrets and spreading them  Recording unauthorized videos and uploading them  Hacking into account and posting damaging messages  Stealing identity of person  Leaving someone out of online groups  Creating a fake online persona to bully others  Sexting  (Bullying Statistics, 2009; Brain Pop, 2012).
  • 14. What is Sexting?  Sexting is defined as the action of sending sexually explicit photos, videos, or text through one‟s own phone or computer to friends or potential suitors.  20% of teenagers participate in sexting  1 in 10 have shared a naked image of themselves
  • 15. Why Do Teens Engage in Sexting  Most Common: To be fun or flirtatious  To date or hook-up with that person  Peer pressure especially by males (51%)  To send a “sexy present” to their boyfriend or girlfriend  To joke around  To feel sexy
  • 16. Sexting Ramifications  Can ruin reputations  Can spread like wild-fire to others thus cause embarrassment and even suicide  Could be considered as distributing child pornography  Could be labeled as a sex offender
  • 17. Sexting, What Can We Do?  We need to teach students about the legal ramifications and embarrassment that could be incurred.  We also need to help parents understand this growing epidemic and inform them of what they can do to protect their child.  Furthermore, because sexting can turn into cyberbullying especially when spread for others‟ amusement, it must be included in the school‟s anti-cyberbullying policy.
  • 18. Why do cyberbullies bully others?  Cyberbullies:  Think that it is funny and want to see a reaction; 81% of teenagers said that others cyberbully because they think it is funny (National Crime Prevention Council, 2012a).  Do it for entertainment because they are bored  Do not consider the consequences of their actions  Are motivated by anger, revenge, or frustration  Do it to torment others and for their ego  Do it to bolster their own social standing  To get revenge for being bullied themselves (Wired Kids, n.d.).
  • 19. Four Types of Cyberbullies  For each type of cyberbully, the motives differ:  The Vengeful Angel  The Power-Hungry and Revenge of the Nerds  Mean Girls  Inadvertent Cyberbully
  • 20. The Vengeful Angel  They do not see themselves as a bully at all.  They see themselves righting wrongs or protecting themselves or others from the “bad guy” they are now cyberbullying.  Includes when the victim becomes the bully.  They are teaching the new victim (initial bully) a lesson.  They are getting revenge on the new victim.  Get involved to protect their cybervictim friends.  We need to help them see that they themselves are bullies and should not take justice into their own hands. (Wired Kids, n.d.)
  • 21. The Victim‟s Revenge
  • 22. Power-Hungry & Revenge of the Nerds  They want to exert their authority and show that they are powerful enough to make others do what they want  They also want to control others with fear  They want an audience so they can brag  This type of bully is usually a victim of offline bullying  They may be physically smaller and usually picked on for not being popular or cool  “Revenge of the Nerds” cyberbullying  Intention is to frighten and embarrass others  Act tough online but not in real life (Wired Kids, n.d.)
  • 23. Mean Girls  They are bored and looking for entertainment  Ego-based cyberbullying  Usually female and bullying other girls  Usually done in a group (virtually or physically)  Requires an audience  They want others to know who they are and that they have power to cyberbully others  Grows when fed by group admiration, cliques and silence of bystanders  Quickly dies if they do not get the entertainment value they are seeking (Wired Kids, n.d.)
  • 24. The Inadvertent Cyberbully  They do not think they are cyberbullies  May be pretending to be tough online like role playing for fun  May be reacting to hateful messages they received feel hurt or angry from what was sent  They do not lash out intentionally like Revenge of the Nerds cyberbullies  They respond without thinking about the consequences of their actions  Respond out of anger and frustration, they do not think before clicking “send”  Sometimes they pick on their friends for fun (Wired Kids, n.d.)
  • 25. What Do the 4 Types Tell Us  “Because the motives differ from each type of cyberbully, the solutions need to address their special issues. There is no „one size fits all‟ when cyberbullying is concerned. But understanding more about why they cyberbully others will help” (Wired Kids, n.d.).  We have to address the motives and our awareness campaigns need to address the problem using several different messages.
  • 26. Why is cyberbullying so common?  Cyberbullies do not consider the consequences of their actions.  Due to the fact that cyberbullying is a faceless harassment, cyberbullies are not able to see the physical and immediate reaction or the nonverbal feedback cues of their victims. As a result, they lack empathy towards their victim, feel remorseless, and will continue in their tormenting process.
  • 27. Feeling of Anonymity  Due to its elusive nature, cyberbullies feel that they are unidentifiable and invisible. Therefore, this sense of anonymity enables cyberbullies to become less inhibited or less restrained from saying hurtful things. By acquiring a false identity, cyberbullies are able to disguise themselves and are more willing to act in ways that they would not do if their identity was known.  By being able to hide behind their avatar, online personality, they are able to avoid being held accountable or responsible for their actions and escape punishment. If caught, the perpetrator can always reason that someone else hacked into their account and posted those hurtful things thus eluding the consequences.
  • 28. Quiz Time How much do you know about cyberbullying?
  • 29. Facts About Cyberbullying Quiz  Please complete the “Facts About Cyberbullying” Quiz. This ten true and false quiz is taken from the Cyberbullying Research Center.  You have five minutes to complete the quiz.
  • 30. Questions 1-5 1.) Victims of cyberbullying are at an increased risk for traditional bullying victimization, substance abuse, and school problems. 2.) A school is protected from legal liability and not required to intervene in cyberbullying incidents that occur away from campus. 3.) Most victims of cyberbullying tell an adult (parent or teacher) about their experience. 4.) Research has shown that victims of cyberbullying suffer from anger, frustration, and sadness. 5.) Cyberbullying does not result in physical harm to victims because it occurs (and is contained) completely online.
  • 31. Questions 6-10 6.) Cyberbullying is just a problem in the United States. 7.) Victims report that they are primarily cyberbullied by strangers. 8.) Traditional schoolyard bullies are also likely to be cyberbullies. 9.) Boys are more likely to be victims of cyberbullying than girls. 10.) Research has shown that utilizing blocking and filtering software decreases the likelihood of experiencing cyberbullying.
  • 32. Question 1  Victims of cyberbullying are at an increased risk for traditional bullying victimization, substance use, and school problems. TRUE  “According to an article published in the journal Deviant Behavior, victims of cyberbullying were significantly more likely to report experiences with traditional bullying, to use illicit substances, and to have other problems at school” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 33. Question 2  A school is protected from legal liability and not required to intervene in cyberbullying incidents that occur away from campus. FALSE  “If any off-campus behavior results in a substantial disruption at school, [schools] can intervene. Moreover, if students are denied the opportunity to learn in a safe environment (because of cyberbullying), school officials who fail to act may also be found liable under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 34. Question 3  Most victims of cyberbullying tell an adult (parent or teacher) about their experience. FALSE  According to Hinduja‟s and Patchin‟s book, Bullying Beyond the Schoolyard: Preventing and Responding to Cyberbullying, “only about 40% of middle school victims of cyberbullying told their parents and less than 30% told a teacher. The book also points out that these numbers are much improved from just 4 years ago when fewer than 15% of victims told an adult” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 35. Question 4  Research has shown that victims of cyberbullying suffer from anger, frustration, and sadness. TRUE  “According to a study published in the Journal of School Violence, victims of cyberbullying were angry (30.6%), frustrated (34%), and sad (21.8%)” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 36. Question 5  Cyberbullying does not result in physical harm to victims because it occurs (and is contained) completely online. FALSE  “While most of the harm associated with cyberbullying is emotional, relational, or psychological (all important harms to prevent) there are many examples where cyberbullying has resulted in very serious physical consequences for victims. The most extreme example of this is the several cases reported in the media of adolescents committing suicide after experiencing cyberbullying” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 37. Question 6  Cyberbullying is just a problem in the United States. FALSE  “There have been a number of recent studies which have demonstrated that cyberbullying is also a problem in a number of other countries (Australia, Canada, Sweden, Turkey)” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a). Furthermore, “several other studies are underway exploring cyberbullying across the world” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 38. Question 7  Victims report that they are primarily cyberbullied by strangers. FALSE  According to Hinduja‟s and Patchin‟s book, Bullying Beyond the Schoolyard: Preventing and Responding to Cyberbullying, “21.1% of victims said the cyberbully was a friend, 20% said it was an ex-friend, and 26.5% said it was someone else from school. Only 6.5% said the cyberbully was a stranger” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 39. Question 8  Traditional schoolyard bullies are also likely to be cyberbullies. TRUE  “According to an article published in Deviant Behavior, traditional bullies are 2.5 times more likely to be a cyberbully than someone who does not bully offline” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 40. Question 9  Boys are more likely to be victims of cyberbullying than girls. FALSE  “Overall it appears that girls are slightly more likely to report being the victim of cyberbullying than boys. More studies have reported that girls are more likely to be victims” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 41. Question 10  Research has shown that utilizing blocking and filtering software decreases the likelihood of experiencing cyberbullying. FALSE  “According to an article published in Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, using filtering software is NOT significantly related to a decreased chance of Internet harassment victimization. Some adults believe that by simply purchasing and installing such software, they have „done their part‟ in safeguarding their child‟s participation online. Software solutions only go so far in controlling certain actions in cyberspace” (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012a).
  • 42. What did this quiz show?  Cyberbullying affects all races and genders and is a worldwide problem.  The majority of students do not tell an adult about their victimization.  The severe negative repercussions that cyberbullying causes to victims can no longer be ignored.
  • 43. Statistics on Cyberbullying  According to cyberbullying statistics from i-SAFE foundation:  Over half of teens have been bullied online  Half have engaged in cyberbullying  Over 25% of teens have been bullied repeatedly through cell phones and Internet  Over half of victims do not tell their parents when cyberbullying occurs (Bullying Statistics, 2009).
  • 44. More Statistics  In another study, only 1 in 10 tell a parent if they have been a cybervictim (Li, 2010; Patchin & Hinduja, 2006).  1 in 10 teens have had embarrassing or damaging pictures taken without permission  1 in 5 teens have engaged in sexting  Girls are more likely than boys to be involved in cyberbullying
  • 45. Even More Statistics  38% of teen girls have been cyberbullied  26% of teen boys have been cyberbullied  13% of teens have had a rumor spread about them on the Internet  20% of teens have been repeatedly threatened online  53% of teens have admitted to saying cruel things online  There is a 70% increase in your likelihood of being cyberbullied if you use a social networking site (Brain Pop, 2012).
  • 46. Permanence of Cyberbullying  Once it is posted on the Internet, it will never go away. It could circulate and then resurface at later times to renew the pain of cyberbullying (Bullying Statistics, 2009).
  • 47. Consequences of Cyberbullying  Cyberbullying can:  Undermine the school climate and environment  Interfere with the victim‟s school functioning by diminishing his/her ability to concentrate academically and by increasing his/her number of absences  Lead to “bullicide” and school shootings (Holladay, 2011).  Cause the development of other mental health problems  Can emotionally scar the victim with its long-term effects that can persist into adulthood
  • 48. Emotional Consequences  Very damaging effects:  Increased anxiety  Depression  Low self-esteem  Distress  Stress  Loneliness  Loss of Interest  Irritability  Fear  Suicide ideation  Suicide
  • 49. Suicide and Cyberbullying  Cyberbullying repercussions can be deadly:  Cybervictims are twice as likely to attempt suicide when compared with peers who experience traditional bullying and were not targeted with online abuse and harassment (Holladay, 2011). Public humiliation and a worldwide audience that joins in to participate in the harassment could be contributing factors that lead to suicide.
  • 50. Megan Meier  In 2006, days before her 14th birthday, Megan Meier, a teen from Missouri, committed suicide by tragically hanging herself.  Her suicide was a result of the constant cyberbullying from Lori Drew who used the pseudonym “Josh Evans” to destroy Megan on MySpace.  Minutes before she hung herself in her closet, Megan read Josh‟s last message to her saying, “the world would be a better place without you” (Miller & Hufstedler, 2009, p. 2).
  • 51. Result of the Megan Meier Tragedy  After Megan‟s death, Missouri passed a law making cyberbullying a “crime that can result in jail time, fines or both” (Snakenborg, Van Acker, & Gable, 2011, p. 90).  Megan‟s tragedy is just one of the many other tragic incidents that occur due to cyberbullying.
  • 52. Legal Implications  In some states, laws have been passed to punish cyberbullies:  Suspension  Expulsion  Fines  Prison Time  In situations where sexting is involved, a “sex offender” label could be placed on the cyberbully regardless if they are a minor.  Furthermore, libel, harassment, identity theft, invasion of privacy, and civil defamation could be used in a lawsuit against cyberbullies.
  • 53. Anti-Cyberbullying Laws  As of right now, 34 states have anti- cyberbullying laws.  TEXAS: “H.B. 1942 Act applies beginning with the 2012-2013 school year. Schools must have a policy. „…„bullying‟ means…engaging in written or verbal expression, expression through electronic means, or physical conduct that occurs on school property, at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, or in a vehicle operated by the district.‟ Nothing in the law about behaviors that occur away from school or about substantial disruption to the learning environment” (Hinduja & Patchin, 2012c).
  • 54. What Can Schools Do?  Educate the school community about it  Educate students that it is wrong and if found doing so, they will be subject to discipline  Review their harassment and bullying policy to see if cyberbullying is included  If it covers cyberbullying, incidents that occur at school or that originate off campus but ultimately result in substantial disruption of the learning environment are well within a school‟s legal authority to intervene (Hinduja & Patchin, 2010).
  • 55. What Can We Do as School Counselors?  Educate all stakeholders especially parents and students about cyberbullying and its effects.  Because the majority of students do not inform an adult, we need to teach them the importance of doing so and how to do it.  In regards to parents, we need to teach them the importance of monitoring.  Incorporate cyberbullying lessons in the school counseling program.
  • 56. Students Need to Know  Let students know about the consequences:  Causes some serious emotional damage to the victim (depression, suicide, etc.)  What they post reflects negatively towards them and may affect their future college and job applications  Can lose their cell phone and computer usage  Legal ramifications: libel, harassment, etc.  Sexting can label them as a “sex offender”  Pseudonyms do not protect them and they can be tracked (IP address and phone companies)
  • 57. One Activity We Could Use  Have all students take out a sheet of paper.  Tell them to crumple it up.  Afterwards, tell them to smooth it back out again as much as possible so that there are no wrinkles.  Then ask: “The wrinkles won‟t ever completely come out, will they?” (Diaz, Evans, & Gallagher, n.d.).  Compare it to: Information we post will always be there and it is impossible to remove.
  • 58. Help Students who are Victims  As school counselors, we need to:  Encourage teens to tell an adult if cyberbullying is occurring  Reassure them that it is not their fault  Inform them to NOT delete the messages but rather print them and save them as proof that cyberbullying is occurring  Show them how to use Print Screen, Report Abuse, and Block Users
  • 59. Show Students Safety Strategies  As school counselors, we need to show students how:  To keep private information from being public (ex. Not posting too much personal information about themselves on the Internet)  To never choose a password that can be easily guessed  To never give out their password to anyone except their parents (aka digital hygiene)  To never post confidential information to others because secrecy is never guaranteed especially when the other person can easily inform others  To take advantage of privacy settings and prevention tools
  • 60. Prevention Tools Usage  Even though students are aware of the availability of prevention tools and techniques such as blocking and reporting abuse, the majority of victims do not utilize these cyberbullying prevention tools. Why?  One reason: The victim would like to know what was posted about them that way the victim does not feel that she is in the dark in not knowing what was said about her.
  • 61. Bystanders Need to Speak Up Martin Luther King Jr. once said: “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.”
  • 62. Encourage Bystanders to Speak Up  Teach students how to be courageous bystanders that:  “Don‟t stand by – Stand Up!”  Do not engage in or support mean comments online or talk about it at school  Support the cybervictim by posting positive comments  Invite the cybervictim to spend time with you  Print the evidence and share with an adult  Tell an adult at home or at school  Confront the cyberbully when it is safe
  • 63. Take 5  Do not fight back. Do not respond to cyberbullying messages (Stop Bullying, n.d.; Hinduja & Patchin, 2012a).  Step away from computer for 5 minutes  Go do an activity that is calming:  Yoga  Deep-breathing  Watch TV  Read a book  Exercise
  • 64. Stop, Block, and Tell  STOP: Do not fight back.  BLOCK: Block the cyberbullies. Use privacy settings and prevention online tools. (Hinduja & Patchin, 2012b).  TELL: Tell an adult about it.
  • 65. Videos To Show Our Students  ABC Family Movie: Cyberbully  BrainPop Video:Cyberbullying  On Guard Online Video: Stand Up to Cyberbullying (On Guard Online, n.d.b).
  • 66. Parents  Parents need to know that:  Even though students have confidence that adults will intervene in their cybervictimization, 90% of cybervictims do NOT report their cyberbullying incidents to an adult (Burnham et al., 2011; Juvonen & Gross, 2008).  In another study, only 24% told a parent and 14% told a teacher of their cybervictimization (Ybarra & Mitchell, 2004).  According to a study conducted by Wong-Lo & Bullock, 41% of students in grades 5-12 stated that their parents have no idea or clue of what they do when using the Internet (2011).
  • 67. Why Students Do Not Tell an Adult  Students do not tell an adult about their cybervictimization because:  They feel adults will not understand them  They feel no one will believe them  They feel they might get blamed  Feel adults will not do anything  Adults will place restrictions on their internet and cell phone usage  Peers will make fun of them  It will exacerbate the problem (Price & Dalgleish, 2010).
  • 68. What Can Parents Do?  Learn more about social media  Become a “friend” of theirs on their social network  Monitor their child‟s internet usage and get their passwords  Place a computer in a shared space such as a living room  Not allow internet access (computer or cell phone) in private rooms since this could expose them to being victims  Have curfews on when the Internet is accessible  Talk to their kids about what is and is not appropriate to post online (oversharing, profanity, and bullying)  Teach children when and how to speak up for help  Know the warning signs of a cyberbully and cybervictim (On Guard Online, n.d.a; On Guard Online, n.d.b).
  • 69. How to Identify a Cybervictim  Warning Signs for Parents:  Unexpectedly stops using their computer or cell phone  Appears nervous or jumpy when an instant message or email appears  Uneasy about going to school  Appears to be angry, depressed, or frustrated after using the computer or cell phone  Becomes withdrawn  Avoids discussions of what they are doing on the computer or cell phone
  • 70. How to Identify a Cyberbully  Warning Signs for Parents:  Quickly switches screens or closes programs when you walk by  Gets unusually upset if computer or cell phone privileges are restricted  Avoids discussions of what they are doing on the computer and cell phone  Appears to be using multiple online accounts  Uses an account that is not theirs
  • 71. Next Step for Parents of a Cybervictim  After their child has confessed of being a victim, parents need to:  Believe the child and help the child feel safe and secure with unconditional support  Help the child seek help: school administrators and, if necessary, law enforcement officers
  • 72. Next Step for Parents of a Cyberbully  Parents need to:  Address the problem head on and not wait for it to go away Talk to child firmly about his/her actions and explain the negative effects it has on victims  Let the child know of the consequences of their actions both at home and at school  Restrict the privilege of using cell phones and computers  Refer their child to the counselor (New, 2012).
  • 73. Biggest Challenges We Face  Three challenges today make it difficult to prevent cyberbullying:  1.) Many people do not see the harm associated with it. They dismiss it because there are “more serious forms of aggression to worry about” (Hinduja & Patchin, 2010).
  • 74. Biggest Challenges We Face cont.  2.) Not many people are willing to step up to respond to cyberbullying. Parents say they do not have the technical skills to keep up. Teachers are afraid to intervene in off- campus behaviors. Law enforcement is hesitant to get involved unless there is clear evidence of a crime or a significant threat to the victim‟s physical safety (Hinduja & Patchin, 2010).
  • 75. Biggest Challenges We Face cont.  3.) In some cyberbullying cases, schools have lost for disciplining school children on their off campus online activity and are seen as having violated the student‟s freedom speech rights (Stop Bullying, n.d.; Brain Pop, 2012).
  • 76. What Can We Do To Overcome These Challenges?  We collectively need to create an environment where students feel comfortable in talking with adults and feel confident that they will intervene to solve the problem.  We also need to involve all stakeholders in the process of stopping cyberbullying.  We also must raise awareness (NCPC, 2012b).  Incorporate target lessons in school counseling program  By doing all of the above, we are on our way in stopping it
  • 77. Resources  To keep up to date with the latest research on cyberbullying visit the Cyberbullying Research Center website (Cyberbullying Research Center, 2012b).  Also visit:  StopBullying.gov  StopCyberbullying.org  NCPC.org  WiredSafety.org
  • 78. References  Brain Pop. (2012). Cyberbullying (video). Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.brainpop.com/technology/computersandinternet/cyberbull ying/  Bullying Statistics. (2009). Cyberbullying statistics. Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/content/cyber-bullying- statistics.html  Burnham, J. J., Wright, V. H., & Houser, R. A. (2011). Cyberbullying: Emergent concerns for adolescents and challenges for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 9(15), 1-31. Retrieved February 28, 2012, from ERIC database.
  • 79. References  Cyberbullying Research Center. (2012a). Facts about cyberbullying quiz. Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.cyberbullying.us/quiz.php?QUIZNUM=1  Cyberbullying Research Center. (2012b). Identifying the causes and consequences of cyberbullying. Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.cyberbullying.us/index.php  Diaz, Y., Evans, L., & Gallagher, R. (n.d.). Anti-social networking: How do texting and social media affect our children? A panel discussion by CSC clinicians at the Nightingale-Bamford school. Retrieved July 10, 2012, from http://www.aboutourkids.org/articles/antisocial_networking_how_do_t exting_social_media_affect_our_children_panel_discussion_csc_
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